Methodology to measure room acoustic response

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by Powell, Sep 23, 2008.

  1. Powell

    Powell Guest

    Looking for a methodology to measure the acoustic response
    of new video production studio. I'm not interested in software
    modeling whatsoever. There is a 80' drape which covers most
    of three walls except when using the green screen. I've notices
    significant slap echo when shooting in this mode.

    My thinking at this point is to place one speaker in three test
    locations across the practical width of the room about 1/3 of
    the way out from the backdrop wall. When we measure a
    speakers frequency response the measurement microphone is
    usually placed 3' from the speaker face. Placement of the
    recording microphone in the room seems critical to
    interpreting the frequency sweep data... the source of my
    question. How do you accurately record a room's true sonic
    signature?
     
    Powell, Sep 23, 2008
    #1
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  2. Powell

    David McCall Guest

    If you have parallel hard surfaced walls you will have echo problems
    and there is very little you can do about it except to soften or
    break up one of those walls.

    David
     
    David McCall, Sep 23, 2008
    #2
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  3. Powell

    Bill Fright Guest

    I'd not measure how much the room sucks, I'd just deaden it! If you
    can't curtain off the wall opposite the green screen than rig a baffle.
    Your curtains might be too thin too. Cubical wall partitions covered
    with piano blankets will suck the sound up pretty good. I've also had
    surprising success with hanging rugs. For that matter if your booming
    over the talent it helps to have the set carpeted.

    good luck
     
    Bill Fright, Sep 24, 2008
    #3
  4. Perhaps you missed the fact that this isn't a performance space
    with sound reinforcement and an audience. This is a television
    studio and the OP is seeking electronic means of correcting
    his acoustical problems. It seems highly unlikely that he can
    effectively do this. People with budgets 100x bigger than his
    do it with acoustic treatment of the room, not by trying to "filter
    out" the slap echo (etc.)

    You will recall that he asked the same questions in r.a.p and
    got effectively the same answer there.
     
    Richard Crowley, Sep 24, 2008
    #4
  5. Powell

    David McCall Guest

    That is correct. The frequencys blocked, and how much they
    get blocked, are directly related to how heavy the fabric is.
    Carpet or rugs pretty good if you keep them out from the wall,
    even better with insulation behind. Trapping bass is harder.

    David
     
    David McCall, Sep 25, 2008
    #5
  6. He is getting the same response over in r.a.m.p.s
     
    Richard Crowley, Sep 25, 2008
    #6
  7. Powell

    Powell Guest

    "Richard Crowley" wrote
    No... never wrote or implied such. Please read header.
     
    Powell, Sep 25, 2008
    #7
  8. Powell

    Powell Guest

    "Richard Crowley" wrote
    Not so. There are for example three levels of room
    certifications from Dolby and THX. Each vendor must
    have a methodology for measurement.

    If you were aware of the costs of professional acoustical
    treatments you would know that proceedings with
    a-pig-an-a-poke is bad business. One could employ
    computer room modeling but that's only slightly less
    offensive to random choice.
     
    Powell, Sep 25, 2008
    #8
  9. Powell

    Powell Guest

    "Arny Krueger" wrote
    Oh, right. And how would you know, mr. no experience?
     
    Powell, Sep 25, 2008
    #9
  10. Powell

    Powell Guest

    "Bill Fright" wrote
    Yes, I've done this ("deaden it") to my editing room.

    I was invited to a music recording session at a recently
    converted 24' x 24' garage. Indoor/Outdoor carpeting on
    the floor, two layers of woven blankets covered the walls
    and an enclosed drum room in one corner. Two smaller
    4' movable partitions were used between players too. For
    such tight quarters my handheld sound level meter never
    went above 92 dB for the four players. The drum room
    was to loud for me to stand in to take a measurement.
     
    Powell, Sep 25, 2008
    #10
  11. Powell

    Powell Guest

    "Bill Fright" wrote
    Yes, I've done this ("deaden it") to my editing room.

    I was invited to a music recording session at a recently
    converted 24' x 24' garage. Indoor/Outdoor carpeting on
    the floor, two layers of woven blankets covered the walls
    and an enclosed drum room in one corner. Two smaller
    4' movable partitions were used between players too. For
    such tight quarters my handheld sound level meter never
    went above 92 dB for the four players. The drum room
    was to loud for me to stand in to take a measurement.
     
    Powell, Sep 26, 2008
    #11
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