Minolta D5???

Discussion in 'Minolta' started by DonicTT, Dec 21, 2005.

  1. DonicTT

    DonicTT Guest

    I have 4 lenses that I have used with my Minolta 9xi. 2 lenses are Tamrons, 1 is a Sigma and 1 is a Minolta.
    Does it make sense to get a D5? or is it worth it in the long run to invest in a different dslr?
    I am just an amateur-enthusiast, who shoots scenics, landscape, and the occassional family snapshots.
    Any advice is appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.
     
    DonicTT, Dec 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. DonicTT

    Al Guest

    I was in the same position as you, with 7 lenses and decided to stay with Minolta. I do not regret my decision. Don't be pushed into the Mega Pixel race, because as a hobbyist or amateur enthusiast you do not need to spend yet more money.
    I have 4 lenses that I have used with my Minolta 9xi. 2 lenses are Tamrons, 1 is a Sigma and 1 is a Minolta.
    Does it make sense to get a D5? or is it worth it in the long run to invest in a different dslr?
    I am just an amateur-enthusiast, who shoots scenics, landscape, and the occassional family snapshots.
    Any advice is appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.
     
    Al, Dec 22, 2005
    #2
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  3. DonicTT

    DonicTT Guest

    thank you Al.
    I was in the same position as you, with 7 lenses and decided to stay with Minolta. I do not regret my decision. Don't be pushed into the Mega Pixel race, because as a hobbyist or amateur enthusiast you do not need to spend yet more money.
    I have 4 lenses that I have used with my Minolta 9xi. 2 lenses are Tamrons, 1 is a Sigma and 1 is a Minolta.
    Does it make sense to get a D5? or is it worth it in the long run to invest in a different dslr?
    I am just an amateur-enthusiast, who shoots scenics, landscape, and the occassional family snapshots.
    Any advice is appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.
     
    DonicTT, Dec 22, 2005
    #3
  4. DonicTT

    Norm Dresner Guest

    The real question is, "What are you going to use your camera for?"

    If you're happy never making anything larger than, say, 8x10 (high quality)
    or 11x14 (acceptable quality) from a "full-frame" digital shot, then the D5
    is a good way to get into the future. If you're seriously thinking that you
    might need to create 20x24 prints, then you're pretty well locked into 35mm
    film or 2-1/4" sq (film or digital).

    The choice I made a year ago was to carry both film and digital bodies
    whenever I went out shooting, and so far I've not regretted it.

    Norm
     
    Norm Dresner, Dec 22, 2005
    #4
  5. DonicTT

    Alan Browne Guest

    Go D5, better yet D7. Good rebate still available in the US for the D7
    I believe.

    You should verify with the lens manufs if they know that those lenses
    work correctly on the 5/D7 first. 9xi is a bit on the old side so I
    assume you lenses are too. Best to check.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 23, 2005
    #5
  6. DonicTT

    Jasen Guest

    Don't get the 5D, get the 7D. The stronger build and more dials/buttons for easy to control features makes for an easy to use camera that is great to take photos with. Sure the 5D is good, but why not pay a little more for a camera you'll have for a long time.
    I've made a pretty good 16x20" print and it is fine. And if you want bigger you can always interpolate up.

    I have the 7D and was going through the same dilemma as yourself. It is far too expensive to change over to a new system and why would you want to anyway? Nothing wrong with Minolta as far as I can tell.
    I have 4 lenses that I have used with my Minolta 9xi. 2 lenses are Tamrons, 1 is a Sigma and 1 is a Minolta.
    Does it make sense to get a D5? or is it worth it in the long run to invest in a different dslr?
    I am just an amateur-enthusiast, who shoots scenics, landscape, and the occassional family snapshots.
    Any advice is appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.
     
    Jasen, Dec 25, 2005
    #6
  7. DonicTT

    DonicTT Guest

    Thanks Jasen. I may make the leap to a 7D.

    Don't get the 5D, get the 7D. The stronger build and more dials/buttons for easy to control features makes for an easy to use camera that is great to take photos with. Sure the 5D is good, but why not pay a little more for a camera you'll have for a long time.
    I've made a pretty good 16x20" print and it is fine. And if you want bigger you can always interpolate up.

    I have the 7D and was going through the same dilemma as yourself. It is far too expensive to change over to a new system and why would you want to anyway? Nothing wrong with Minolta as far as I can tell.
    I have 4 lenses that I have used with my Minolta 9xi. 2 lenses are Tamrons, 1 is a Sigma and 1 is a Minolta.
    Does it make sense to get a D5? or is it worth it in the long run to invest in a different dslr?
    I am just an amateur-enthusiast, who shoots scenics, landscape, and the occassional family snapshots.
    Any advice is appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.
     
    DonicTT, Dec 25, 2005
    #7
  8. I added a 7D to my two 9xi's a year ago, at the time my lens collection
    consisted of Minolta, Sigma, Tamron and Tokina glass dating back to 1993
    or before - and all work perfectly on the 7D.

    I can personally attest to the durability of the 7D - two weeks ago I was
    setting up to take some Santa photos at a high school when I put the 7D
    with an old Minolta 4000AF strobe down on a lunch table for a minute. As
    I turned away, the camera toppled forward and off the table some 30 inches
    or so to a hard tile floor. The camera and strobe parted company, and I
    tried to prepare myself for devastation...

    As it was, the $30 Minolta FS-1100 hot shoe adapter sacrificed itself to
    save both camera and strobe... I had to do the shoot with available
    light, but the camera shows absolutely no signs of duress, and with the
    replacement FS-1100 that arrived a couple days ago, I confirmed the 4000AF
    was also undamaged and I was taking flash shots at my sister's on
    Christmas Eve.
    Bob ^,,^
     
    Bob Harrington, Dec 26, 2005
    #8
  9. DonicTT

    Alan Browne Guest

    Glad to hear it.
    It's nice when the cheap parts break to save the expensive. As ee used
    to say "The $400 transistor fried thereby protecting the $0.20 fuse."

    I had to do the shoot with available
    Great again.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 27, 2005
    #9
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