MSNBC graphics kicked ass!

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by Charlie, Nov 5, 2008.

  1. Charlie

    Charlie Guest

    Political junkie that I am, I constantly scanned all the networks and cable
    news, and thought that MSNBC was far ahead everyone else.

    The 3D perspective virtual set with Chuck Todd was interesting, but I mean the
    constant, on-air graphics on the right border and along the bottom. They were
    very easy to read, and they always had the current leader listed first. I
    cringed when I checked CNN and saw them pointing and drawing on a screen I could
    hardly read.

    Speaking of the 3D set, does anyone have a link to their site or the technical
    background? I'm guessing something similar to the yellow first down marker on
    football coverage, where the computer tracks the zoom, pan, and tilt. Maybe even
    a target marker on the chroma background that the computer can see, but keys out
    with the rest of the green? (Guessing green)
     
    Charlie, Nov 5, 2008
    #1
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  2. Charlie

    mkujbida Guest


    If you're referring to the "hologram" that CNN did, here's a link to
    the details.
    http://gizmodo.com/5076663/how-the-cnn-holographic-interview-system-works

    Mike
     
    mkujbida, Nov 5, 2008
    #2
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  3. Charlie

    Charlie Guest

    I saw that but it just looked like a regular chroma key.

    The one I'm talking about had a virtual set that was computer generated and they
    keyed Chuck Todd into it. Kind of a Roman theater design. As the camera on Chuck
    moved about, the set adjusted for the changing perspective. They also had some
    graphic screens slide up from the floor as the topic changed. Would have looked
    much better with a more realistic CG set design. Like I suggested, it was if the
    green screen had some visual cues that the CK camera picked up and sent signals
    to the CG for the set. Maybe they just used motion control camera linked to the
    CG, like they do in film production. With that I think each move had to be
    preprogrammed for the move.
     
    Charlie, Nov 7, 2008
    #3
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