Muldoon was right

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Me, Dec 1, 2009.

  1. Me

    Me Guest

    It is a "reverse" brain drain:
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10612863

    But it mightn't have been that way back in Muldoon's day.
    The Aus micro-economic reforms were always based on preserving a quality
    of life for the Aussie battler, despite a brief period where Keating
    appeared to embrace the now discredited theory of "trickle down".
     
    Me, Dec 1, 2009
    #1
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  2. Me

    Me Guest

    No, I'm struggling to think of a way to link it to something relevant
    now it's apparent that my cancel message arrived after my usenet
    provider had propagated the message. Bugger.

    Here's a try:
    Ordinary working Australians have one of the highest standards of living
    in the world, with sufficient disposable income after tax and living
    expenses to buy luxury items like digital cameras and computers.

    A reason for that is that successive Labour and Liberal governments
    rejected the arguments pushed by zealots for the Rand inspired
    Greenspan/Reagan style of economic rationalism, and instead adopted a
    managed process of micro-economic reform, guaranteeing a minimum wage
    for every worker, (currently about US$15 per hour), preserving jobs by
    setting policy favouring capital intensive investment in industry, and
    introducing a compulsory part employer-funded superannuation scheme
    which now has several hundred billion dollars worth of investments in
    Australia.

    Perhaps the best test of the success of these reforms can be seen in
    Australia's economy being almost completely unscathed by the global
    economic events of '08/09, including camera sales - which have been
    holding up very well.
     
    Me, Dec 1, 2009
    #2
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  3. Me

    Robert Coe Guest

    : Alan Browne wrote:
    : > Me wrote:
    : >> It is a "reverse" brain drain:
    : >> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10612863
    : >>
    : >> But it mightn't have been that way back in Muldoon's day.
    : >> The Aus micro-economic reforms were always based on preserving a
    : >> quality of life for the Aussie battler, despite a brief period where
    : >> Keating appeared to embrace the now discredited theory of "trickle down".
    : >
    : > Which has nothing to do with this ng.
    :
    : No, I'm struggling to think of a way to link it to something relevant
    : now it's apparent that my cancel message arrived after my usenet
    : provider had propagated the message. Bugger.
    :
    : Here's a try:
    : Ordinary working Australians have one of the highest standards of living
    : in the world, with sufficient disposable income after tax and living
    : expenses to buy luxury items like digital cameras and computers.
    :
    : A reason for that is that successive Labour and Liberal governments
    : rejected the arguments pushed by zealots for the Rand inspired
    : Greenspan/Reagan style of economic rationalism, and instead adopted a
    : managed process of micro-economic reform, guaranteeing a minimum wage
    : for every worker, (currently about US$15 per hour), preserving jobs by
    : setting policy favouring capital intensive investment in industry, and
    : introducing a compulsory part employer-funded superannuation scheme
    : which now has several hundred billion dollars worth of investments in
    : Australia.
    :
    : Perhaps the best test of the success of these reforms can be seen in
    : Australia's economy being almost completely unscathed by the global
    : economic events of '08/09, including camera sales - which have been
    : holding up very well.

    You're saying, IOW, that the reason B&H and others can't get the wide-angle
    lens I want is that affluent Aussies are buying them up? 8^(

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 5, 2009
    #3
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