My black and white looks blue and gray

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Mark C, Nov 12, 2003.

  1. Mark C

    Mark C Guest

    I am using PS7 and when I convert some images to grayscale....it looks more
    like everything has a blue-ish tint to it.

    What is the best method for converting a color digital photo to black and
    white using PS7. For example, is it better to desaturate or use
    grayscale.......any suggestions would be most appreciated.

    Ciao,
    Mark C
    Nashville,TN
     
    Mark C, Nov 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. http://epaperpress.com/psphoto

    Click on Black & White. I also suggest you use the eyedropper to see what
    the colors really are. If all channels contribute equally, you need to
    adjust your monitor.
     
    perspicacious, Nov 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. When you convert to grayscale in Photoshop, you get an image that has
    only one number (intensity) for each pixel. It's just shades of white.
    If the white appears bluish, then your monitor is misadjusted (do all
    whites, including terminal windows and editor windows, appear blue)
    or you're doing some sort of colour temperature conversion.

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, Nov 12, 2003
    #3
  4. Mark C

    jam Guest

    | I am using PS7 and when I convert some images to grayscale....it
    looks more
    | like everything has a blue-ish tint to it.
    |
    | What is the best method for converting a color digital photo to
    black and
    | white using PS7. For example, is it better to desaturate or use
    | grayscale.......any suggestions would be most appreciated.
    |
    | Ciao,
    | Mark C
    | Nashville,TN

    I'm not familiar with PS7 but assume that it pretty much duplicates
    PhotoShop features. Your two best bets are

    1. Convert to Lab color mode and simply use the L (lightness) channel.
    It contains all the luminance data in the image. This method is
    subject to quantization errors in the conversion to Lab, but these are
    rarely visible.

    2. Use your equivalent of PhotoShop's channel mixer.

    For details, see www.cliffshade.com/dpfwiw/b&w.htm#lab-grayscale and
    www.cliffshade.com/dpfwiw/b&w.htm#mixing.

    One-click grayscale conversions like the one you used are seldom the
    best approach.
     
    jam, Nov 13, 2003
    #4
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