My color settings are a mess! Help!

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by Stephan, Dec 23, 2003.

  1. Stephan

    Stephan Guest

    My color settings are a mess! Help!

    I've got PS CS and I just got a new digital camera (Canon 10D).



    I've been reading about color management with CS and I think I'm using a
    pretty standard setup. My working space is "AdobeRGB" and for Color
    Management policies I'm using "Preserve Embedded Profiles".



    Seems good. I take a picture with the camera, looks great on the camera.
    Load it to my hard drive, look at it (jpg) using windows explorer and it
    still looks great.



    I open the file in Photoshop, and it looks like crap. All color has been
    washed out by a strong sepia tone. Very bad color.



    The only way I can get PS CS to show good color with my images is to use the
    following for my working space:



    Monitor RGB-Nec Multisync LCD [email protected]



    This then automaticly turns off RGB Color Management policies.



    So with my Monitor RGB working space, I can even VIEW-PROOF COLORS and it
    still looks good.



    If I open the image using the AdobeRGB working space (looks bad) and I proof
    colors to Monitor RGB then the image looks great.



    What am I missing??? What am I doing wrong?



    Any insight would be helpful!
     
    Stephan, Dec 23, 2003
    #1
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  2. Stephan

    Stephan Guest

    One more thing, my monitor is a Nec Multisync LCD 1760.
     
    Stephan, Dec 23, 2003
    #2
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  3. Stephan

    Stephan Guest


    You need to read this:
    http://www.computer-darkroom.com/ps7-colour/ps7_1.htm
    It saved me from going nuts.

    Stephan (photographer also)
     
    Stephan, Dec 23, 2003
    #3
  4. Stephan

    mscir Guest

    have you tried this free monitor calibration wizard:

    http://www.hex2bit.com/products/product_mcw.asp

    features of Monitor Calibration Wizard:
    - Easy wizard for creating color profiles for you monitor.
    - Support for an unlimited number of profiles.
    - A brightness adjustment of the color profile to match your needs.
     
    mscir, Dec 23, 2003
    #4
  5. Stephan

    Stephan Guest

    What is wrong with Adobe Gamma?

    Stephan
     
    Stephan, Dec 23, 2003
    #5
  6. Stephan

    Husky Guest

    http://www.colormatters.com/comput_colorblind.html
    use this link b4 you go to work at changing color settings in different
    programs. Think it says 70% of those on the web, their monitors are color
    blind. Mine was and since only one or two people ever complained about my
    washed out pix, it would seem the 70% is fairly accurate. I've had to go back
    thru several hundred pix and add saturation to them to restore some color.
    more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
     
    Husky, Dec 23, 2003
    #6
  7. Stephan

    mscir Guest

    Stephan,

    You're right, that works great... I used it for the first time.
     
    mscir, Dec 24, 2003
    #7
  8. Switch off colour management!
    If you must, for the RGB working space use your monitor's profile.
    When you make a print, if the colours are brighter than the monitor shows,
    use the advanced (colour) mode and desaturate the colours until they look
    the same.

    If you are sending your work to a lab for printing, apply THEIR colour
    profile before saving the image you will send them. The lab I use has their
    own ICC profile and I have never had an 'off-colour' print from them. Before
    I changed to them, I used to get prints all over the spectrum from a cheaper
    lab which didn't turn out cheaper at all!.

    When you open an image, convert it to your working space. The embedded
    profiles are some other idea of what colour you 'need'. Embed a profile when
    the destination of image has it's own profile otherwise... Leave it alone.
    Doug
     
    Techno Aussie, Dec 24, 2003
    #8
  9. Stephan

    Todd Cary Guest

    I use Windows PS 7, Sony flat screen HMD-A240R, Nikon D100 using the
    Adobe color profile and the profile in PS is also Adobe.

    Last night I took a picture in which one of the subjects was wearing a
    grey sweater and someone else was wearing a white blouse. On the
    monitor, they look fine, BUT when I send them to my HP 7150 (6 color),
    they are overly warm. What is confusing is that the white blouse is white.

    Is there some documentation on a systematic approach to getting the
    printer and monitor in sync?

    Todd

    P.S. The responses so far have been very helpful.
     
    Todd Cary, Dec 25, 2003
    #9
  10. Stephan

    Todd Cary Guest

    I use Windows PS 7, Sony flat screen HMD-A240R, Nikon D100 using the
    Adobe color profile and the profile in PS is also Adobe.

    Last night I took a picture in which one of the subjects was wearing a
    grey sweater and someone else was wearing a white blouse. On the
    monitor, they look fine, BUT when I send them to my HP 7150 (6 color),
    they are overly warm. What is confusing is that the white blouse is white.

    Is there some documentation on a systematic approach to getting the
    printer and monitor in sync?

    Todd

    P.S. The responses so far have been very helpful.
     
    Todd Cary, Dec 25, 2003
    #10
  11. Stephan

    Stephan Guest

    white.

    If your blouse is white then your image cannot be too warm.
    What I suspect is that you are judging your prints in the wrong lighting.

    Stephan
     
    Stephan, Dec 25, 2003
    #11
  12. Todd...
    Your printer has an ICC profile. probably on the install CD.
    Switch off colour correction in PS.
    Do all your editing and when the pic is right, apply the printer profile and
    see what happens.
    Doug
     
    Techno Aussie, Dec 26, 2003
    #12
  13. Stephan

    Flycaster Guest

    Stephan, though proof lighting is important, that white is "correct" is a
    red herring. All white means is that the printer is instructed to lay down
    NO ink. So as long as the paper is "white", he'll get "white", irrespective
    of how screwed up the rest of his color management is.
     
    Flycaster, Dec 26, 2003
    #13
  14. Stephan

    Stephan Guest

    You are right.

    Stephan
     
    Stephan, Dec 26, 2003
    #14
  15. Stephan

    Todd Cary Guest

    Well, I figured out the problem: the paper! I was using Epson Glossy
    Photo Paper and when I tried a test print on my Kodax Premium Photo
    Paper, the grays were neutral and the color cast was absent.
    Apparently, the HP six color inks react with the Epson paper.

    I would like to have any information/thoughts on this.

    Todd
     
    Todd Cary, Dec 26, 2003
    #15
  16. Stephan

    Flycaster Guest

    Live and learn. Next time, use the right paper.
     
    Flycaster, Dec 26, 2003
    #16
  17. Stephan

    Phil Guest

    One of many ways to to this might be to go to Image/Mode/Assign
    Profile, then scroll down until the specific paper for your printer is
    seen (not the printer itself). The picture may turn quite bluish on
    your screen but will then print correctly.
     
    Phil, Dec 29, 2003
    #17
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