Need internal light meter repair - Ricoh SLX 500 (all mechanical)

Discussion in 'Ricoh' started by Theo, Nov 3, 2004.

  1. Theo

    Theo Guest

    Hey now,

    Does anyone know where I could send an old (mid '70's) Ricoh SLX 500
    mechanical SLR camera to get the light meter fixed? It's got a lever
    besides the lens that, when pulled, should make a needle in the viewfinder
    move around between a "+" and "-" indicator as the f-stop is changed. No
    one wants to touch it. Can these things ever be repaired for less than the
    cost of the camera?

    Thanks!
    Theo
     
    Theo, Nov 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. Theo

    jaf Guest

    jaf, Nov 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. Michael A. Covington, Nov 4, 2004
    #3
  4. Also a place called Essex Camera Repair, in the northeastern U.S. somewhere.

    You might be able to find a used camera body that takes the same lenses very
    cheaply. And sell the meterless one to an amateur astronomer who doesn't
    need the meter.

    QUERY: You say "lever that should make the needle move" -- Do you mean the
    meter doesn't turn on? What condition is the battery in? Your symptoms
    sound like a dead battery.

    Which I'll be happy to fix for $100 :) :) :)
     
    Michael A. Covington, Nov 4, 2004
    #4
  5. The short answer is NO.

    The long answer is that your Ricoh is pretty vanilla, and not regarded
    as one of the best brands anyway. You'd probably do better finding a
    different body (Pentax? Fuji?) that was working.

    That said, there IS something fun about having an obscure piece of
    equipment overhauled and continuing to use it; it just doesn't make
    economic sense. I still use a 1954 Leica IIIg, but (sorry) a Ricoh
    isn't a Leica.
     
    Scott Schuckert, Nov 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Theo

    Theo Guest

    Okay, so I put a new battery in, and suddenly remembered how the problem
    first arose in 1985: When the lever is actuated, the lever now goes to the
    maximum "+" position, suggesting that the cell itself is shot.

    If I could take it apart and extract the cell, what are the odds of
    procuring a replacement? I think you are right, a replacement body makes
    more sense.

    Thanks for your help
    Theo
     
    Theo, Nov 4, 2004
    #6
  7. I don't know. You might also look for a broken wire somewhere.
     
    Michael A. Covington, Nov 5, 2004
    #7
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