Need tips for taking night lights, at night?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Net Doe, Jan 2, 2008.

  1. Net Doe

    Net Doe Guest

    I got a Pentax K10D for Christmas, and want to learn how to take
    the Christmas lights in my house (taking them down after tomorrow),
    or any night lights. I use a 18-55mm lens, set it at TAv (shutter +
    aperture priority), with aperture at f/4.0 and shutter speed at least
    5 secs. I get either the lights too washed out so I don't see the
    colored lights, or I don't see the house at all. Any pointers?
     
    Net Doe, Jan 2, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Net Doe

    Peter Guest

    I assume you are using a tripod. Make three exposures, one for the lights,
    one for the background and a third in between. Merge them in Photoshop using
    HDR.

    If you don't have PS CS3, copy each shot on to a separate layer. Play with
    masking and play with transparency until you get what you like. Yes it
    really works.

    HTH
     
    Peter, Jan 2, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Net Doe

    roentarre Guest

    Get a tripod, turn off SR, change ISO to 400, aperture to f8 with AV
    priority control. It would turn out fine
     
    roentarre, Jan 2, 2008
    #3
  4. Net Doe

    dadiOH Guest

    Set it so you get a reasonable representation of the lights and pop a
    flash so you get an underexposed image of the house.

    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Jan 2, 2008
    #4
  5. Net Doe

    ray Guest

    Experiment. Electrons are cheap.
     
    ray, Jan 2, 2008
    #5
  6. Very easy: Take the picture in the so called "blue hour". That's the
    time between sunset and darkness. Results look like this:
    http://www.gugau-foto.de/details.php?image_id=5 (yes, the LEDs were blue).

    Andreas
     
    Andreas Gugau, Jan 2, 2008
    #6
  7. If you don't have Photoshop CS3, you can do HDR's in CS2.
    But if you don't have photoshop at all, there are plenty of freeware and
    shareware HDR processing programmes out there that will handle the job for
    you.
    I used the HDR technique that Peter mentioned to get this shot.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swampy_bogtrotter/2127428272/
     
    \(not quite so\) Fat Sam, Jan 2, 2008
    #7
  8. Net Doe

    Net Doe Guest

    Thanks to all who replied! I will try all your suggestions!

    Yes I've read about the blue hour, and have played around with taking pics
    then, with a tungsten white balance setting. But I do indeed want to learn
    how
    to take pics "at night".
     
    Net Doe, Jan 2, 2008
    #8
  9. Net Doe

    Net Doe Guest

    Nice, this is exactly the picture I want. I have d/l'd the trial version of
    PS CS3 and will play around with it...
     
    Net Doe, Jan 2, 2008
    #9
  10. Net Doe

    Rob Morley Guest

    Sam
    says...
    Woo, pretty lights. I'd have played down the street light and road
    sign, though, lost the car and the other building, and maybe added a bit
    of cheesy star diffraction. :)
     
    Rob Morley, Jan 2, 2008
    #10
  11. Net Doe

    Jeff R. Guest



    http://www.mendosus.com/armidale/uralla.jpg
    Cheesy enough?
    :)
     
    Jeff R., Jan 3, 2008
    #11
  12. Net Doe

    Rob Morley Guest

    Not quite the effect I'd aim for, but I still use film and filters so
    I'm not really au fait with digital tweaks and HDR. :)
     
    Rob Morley, Jan 3, 2008
    #12
  13. Net Doe

    Joel Guest

    I believe I read someone here mentioned that 35mm is equal to around 30MP
    digital camera, and it's very easy to turn film into digital these days.
    IOW, after you turn the 30MP film to digital then you can HDR more than
    6-10MP digital can, not?
     
    Joel, Jan 3, 2008
    #13
  14. That was indeed mentioned, and it was also pointed out
    how untrue it is. Some people might accept any number
    from 6 to 8MP as what it takes to equal 35mm film.
    There is no question that 10MP is beyond what 35mm can
    do.

    The 30MP figure is what it takes to *scan* a 35mm
    negative, which is an entirely different matter.
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Jan 3, 2008
    #14
  15. Net Doe

    Paul Furman Guest

    Paul Furman, Jan 3, 2008
    #15
  16. Net Doe

    Ken Hart Guest

    Load the slowest film available.Determine the exposure for the lights by
    holding your meter within a foot or so of a group os the lights. Open the
    shutter, then quickly take a small strobe and 'flash' the house from a
    distance of about 10' in various locations.
    The long time exposure will expose the Christmas lights, the strobe pops
    will expose the house.By moving quickly, you won't show up as you move thru
    the picture.
     
    Ken Hart, Jan 4, 2008
    #16
  17. Net Doe

    Net Doe Guest

    Yeah I tried that idea already and it didn't work...
     
    Net Doe, Jan 4, 2008
    #17
  18. Net Doe

    dadiOH Guest

    You didn't do it right then. It is SOP.

    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Jan 5, 2008
    #18
  19. Net Doe

    Chris H Guest

    See http://www.lostamerica.com/

    for some interesting night pictures... neither the site or photographer
    and anything to do with me, I cam across it by chance. They look
    fascinating and he also gives a lot of information on the techniques
     
    Chris H, Jan 5, 2008
    #19
  20. Net Doe

    Robert Coe Guest

    : >
    : >> In article <477c3f4d$0$8437$>, Jeff R.
    : >> says...
    : >> > : >>
    : >> > > Woo, pretty lights. I'd have played down the street light and road
    : >> > > sign, though, lost the car and the other building, and maybe added
    : >> > > a bit of cheesy star diffraction. :)
    : >> >
    : >> > http://www.mendosus.com/armidale/uralla.jpg
    : >> > Cheesy enough?
    : >> > :)
    : >> >
    : >> Not quite the effect I'd aim for, but I still use film and filters so
    : >> I'm not really au fait with digital tweaks and HDR. :)
    : >
    : > I believe I read someone here mentioned that 35mm is equal to around
    : >30MP digital camera,
    :
    : That was indeed mentioned, and it was also pointed out
    : how untrue it is. Some people might accept any number
    : from 6 to 8MP as what it takes to equal 35mm film.
    : There is no question that 10MP is beyond what 35mm can
    : do.

    Are there actual performance figures to support that? Nobody is a stronger
    advocate for digital than I am, but I would have said that the best
    high-resolution Kodachrome (K25 in my day, but it may have gotten faster
    since) would beat my 10MP digital.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jan 5, 2008
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.