New Kodak DX6490 Camera

Discussion in 'Kodak' started by Ron Baird, Aug 20, 2003.

  1. Ron Baird

    Ron Baird Guest

    Greetings All,

    Just a note to let you all know about a new camera we have just announced.
    Many have noted that they wanted a camera with some particular features. We
    listened and spent some time getting such a camera ready for you. The
    result is the new Kodak EasyShare DX6490 zoom digital camera.

    http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pq-path=1336&pq-locale=en_US

    For a review of it, just go to the Kodak home page and click on that camera
    listing, you are going to love the features.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    Ron Baird
    Kodak
     
    Ron Baird, Aug 20, 2003
    #1
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  2. Ron Baird

    Norwoodnat Guest

    Price?

    The "in the box" list does not include a battery?

    Does it have an external flash provision like my lovely dc4800?

    Will it do an automatic series of exposure compensation?

    Why do you want to make everyones inventory of compact flash cards obsolete
    and useless?

    What is the widest lenses opening at 10x and is there any stabilization?
     
    Norwoodnat, Aug 20, 2003
    #2
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  3. Ron Baird

    Ron Baird Guest

    Greetings Norwood,

    Thanks for the note, there is not price listed just yet, but I am going to
    guess it will be in the high $400 range ($495)? Soon as I hear what it is I
    will share with all.

    Yes, there is a lithium Ion Battery included with the camera. Could not run
    the camera without it.

    I do not think that feature is included. Some higher end film cameras did
    include it but not in cameras in the noted price range. If that is a
    frequently used feature for you, I will move it on to our engineers.
    Usually that kind of feature is related to film cameras to make sure they
    have captured all possible exposure scenarios on film.

    We always stay on top of the latest technology, Norwood, and that would
    include the use of MMC/SD cards that may potentially enable the use of many
    devices with images. The CFC cards are larger and earlier technology.
    Kodak cameras have been using MMC/SD cards for some time as have other
    makers.

    I am including the specs for the camera below for you to review.
    Specifically, f/2.8 - 8.0 (wide); f3.7 - 8.0 (tele)

    Let me know if you have questions, I am glad to help.

    Ron Baird
    Kodak

    CCD resolution 4.23 MP (2408x1758 pixels)
    image resolution 4.0 megapixel (2304x1728 pixels)
    image quality 4.0MP - best (print, enlargement 20" x 30")
    3.5MP - best (optimized ratio for 4" x 6" prints, 3:2)
    2.1MP - better (small print)
    1.1 MP - good (e-mail)

    zoom 30Xtotal zoom
    10Xoptical zoom, 6.3-63.2mm (35mm equivalent: 38-380mm)
    3.0XAdvanced Digital Zoom

    focus/auto-focus Multi-zone, center-spot
    focus distance wide std. - 0.6m (2 ft.) to infinity; tele std. -- 2m
    (6.6 ft.) to infinity; wide/tele infinity: 20m (65.6 ft.) to infinity
    display LCD - 2.2" (5.6cm) 153k pixels, Indoor/Outdoor display;
    aperture f/2.8 - 8.0 (wide); f3.7 - 8.0 (tele)
    shutter speed 16-1/1700 sec.
    ISO equivalent Automatic - (80 - 160); Selectable - 80/100/200/400/800
    white balance auto, daylight, tungsten, fluorescent
    flash mode automatic, fill, red-eye, off; external flash synch
    available
    flash range wide - 0.5 - 4.9m (1.6 - 16.1ft.); tele - 2.0 - 3.7m
    (6.6 - 12.1 ft.)
    viewfinder electronic - 1.1cm (.44 in.), 180K pixels (800x225)
    self-timer 10 seconds

    Performance Features

    scene/other modes automatic, sport, portrait, night, landscape,
    close-up, program (aperture priority, shutter priority), manual
    color mode color, black and white, sepia, saturated, neutral,
    sharpness (sharp, standard, soft)
    macro/close-up mode wide - 12 - 70cm (4.7 - 27.6 in.); tele -
    120-210cm (47.2 - 82.7 in.)
    burst mode 3 fps, up to 6 pictures
    light metering method TTL-AE (menu selectable: multi-pattern, center
    weighted, center spot
    exposure compensation +/- 2.0 EV with 0.33 EV step increments
    exposure control program AE aperature priority, shutter priority,
    manual
    click to capture 0.65 seconds
    shot to shot <2 seconds
    movie mode continuous digital video with audio capture, audio playback
    on camera
    movie image resolution 320 x 240 pixels at 20 fps

    movie length up to 80 minutes, limited by capacity of external memory
    card

    Ease of Use Features

    capture mode capture always ready
    auto-orientation auto picture rotation
    delete dedicated delete button
    review dedicated review button
    share dedicated share button
    review mode 2X or 4X magnify, picture info, slide show, multi-up, fast
    scroll, protect, albums
    video out NTSC, PAL (user-selectable)
    software Kodak EasyShare software v3.1
    interface Dock Compatibility - Kodak EasyShare camera dock 6000, Kodak
    EasyShare printer dock 6000

    Additional Features

    storage internal storage: 16 MB internal memory
    external storage: MMC/SD card expansion slot

    power options DC in jack on side of camera for 5V adapter; Kodak
    EasyShare Li-ion rechargeable battery (KLIC 5000 or KLIC 5501), Kodak
    EasyShare camera dock 6000 and Kodak EasyShare printer dock 6000
    image file format still: JPEG/EXIF v2.2; movie: Quicktime
    interface USB 2.0 compatible, Kodak EasyShare camera dock 6000 and
    Kodak EasyShare printer dock 6000 compatible
    lens protection lens cap tethered to camera body
    tripod mount 1/4 in. standard
    weight without batteries and memory card: 337g (11.9 oz.)
    dimensions WxHxD: 99.6x79.9x81.2mm (3.9x3.1x3.2 in.)
    warranty one year
     
    Ron Baird, Aug 21, 2003
    #3
  4. Ron Baird

    Ron Baird Guest

    Hi Anand,

    No, it only yields a JPG file format. This is the most commonly used
    imaging format today and will yield excellent images in prints and onscreen.
    Of course, when the camera is purchased, it includes Kodak EasyShare
    Software that will save an image to BMP, TIFF, or JPG. These features may
    work well for your needs.

    The image file format for the camera is JPEG/EXIF v 2.2

    Talk to you soon.

    Ron Baird
    Kodak
     
    Ron Baird, Aug 21, 2003
    #4
  5. Ron Baird

    Ron Baird Guest

    Greetings Driscoll,

    Nope not accessory lenses on this model. We tried to include as much as we
    could in the camera in terms of lens capacity, so, no accessory lenses at
    this point.

    Ron Baird
    Kodak
     
    Ron Baird, Aug 21, 2003
    #5
  6. Ron Baird

    Tony Guest

    (Offshoreman) wrote in
    Those things would be nice. But this camera is going to be pretty
    inexpensive.
     
    Tony, Aug 22, 2003
    #6
  7. Ron Baird

    Travis Guest

    The Nikon 5700 uses Compact Flash and it will be my next camera.
     
    Travis, Aug 22, 2003
    #7
  8. Ron Baird

    Dana Laffit Guest

    Or the Canon G3. Also uses CF cards and can save in uncompressed
    format, plus it has better specs and ranges.
     
    Dana Laffit, Aug 22, 2003
    #8
  9. Ron Baird

    Ron Hunter Guest

    I agree that the CF card is superior, and considerably cheaper. The MMC
    cards are so small that I seriously worry about losing one in the grass.
     
    Ron Hunter, Aug 22, 2003
    #9
  10. My next camera will be a Canon digital SLR. If the price of the 300D turns
    out to really be $900 (without a lens), I think it's a no-brainer.
     
    Tony Whitaker, Aug 23, 2003
    #10
  11. Ron Baird

    Ron Baird Guest

    Hi Offshoreman,

    I appreciate the feedback, and the thoughts, I will pass them on.

    Well, though I am not privy to exact reasons, I am going to guess that they
    wanted to bring that camera in at under $500. To do that they could not
    include an OLED screen, nor provide a 6 megapixel imager. I have to believe
    that would have significantly increased the price. Rather, the 4 megapixel
    imager is terrific and will yield exceptional results since the lens is an
    optical zoom. If you add the digital zoom you are at 15x. At 10X optical,
    however, you will love the results. Also, since it has an external flash
    option you will be able to extend your flash range to include whatever you
    zoom in on.

    The larger viewing screen is great, though not an OLED, and it does offer
    the TTL featured electronic viewer (viewfinder) so you can capture what you
    want with out having to remove from your eye. Nice feature and sought
    after.

    We have released the DX4530 which is a 5 megapixel imager. Not an LS model,
    pretty nice though.

    Talk to you soon,

    Ron Baird
    Kodak
     
    Ron Baird, Aug 25, 2003
    #11
  12. Ron Baird

    Ron Baird Guest

    Hi Travis,

    No doubt about it, Travis, at $1,000 the 5700 is a nice camera.

    Ron Baird
    Kodak
     
    Ron Baird, Aug 25, 2003
    #12
  13. Ron Baird

    Ron Baird Guest

    Hi Anand,

    There is a builtin flash on the camera but a basic flash connector included
    in the camera for flash-synch. Most flashes can be attached to a camera
    using such a plug connection. It also means that the flash would have to be
    mounted to a holder or that you hold it in your hand. Most using an
    external flash will use a flash bracket. You can find them on the web.
    Check the Stroboframe options, as I have found them to work quite well. The
    FlipFlash, or whatever they are now called works well and they are
    inexpensive.

    http://www.kodak.com/go/dx6490

    Talk to you soon.

    Ron Baird
    Kodak





    "anand" wrote in message
     
    Ron Baird, Aug 26, 2003
    #13
  14. Ron Baird

    Ron Baird Guest

    Hi Anand,

    There is a builtin flash on the camera but a basic flash connector included
    in the camera for flash-synch. Most flashes can be attached to a camera
    using such a plug connection. It also means that the flash would have to be
    mounted to a holder or that you hold it in your hand. Most using an
    external flash will use a flash bracket. You can find them on the web.
    Check the Stroboframe options, as I have found them to work quite well. The
    FlipFlash, or whatever they are now called works well and they are
    inexpensive.

    http://www.kodak.com/go/dx6490

    Talk to you soon.

    Ron Baird
    Kodak
     
    Ron Baird, Aug 26, 2003
    #14
  15. Ron Baird

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Which costs how much? Grin.
     
    Ron Hunter, Aug 26, 2003
    #15
  16. Ron Baird

    Bill Jackson Guest

    yea, yea yea. The DX6490 is a great value at $499 list, about a quarter of
    what that setup cost me with the 10D
     
    Bill Jackson, Aug 26, 2003
    #16
  17. Yeah. I bought a Nikon Coolpix 5000 last April simply because it was
    heavily discounted as a display model. Otherwise, I wouldn't even have
    considered it. It also has 28mm at the low end of the zoom. At the time, I
    was lamenting the lack of a strong zoom, thinking the 28mm wide angle
    didn't make alot of difference compared to the 35mm wide angle most
    digicams have.

    But, I've discovered it DOES make a difference. I use it alot. It's a shame
    there's quite a bit of barrel distortion with the Nikon lens, though.
     
    Tony Whitaker, Aug 27, 2003
    #17
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