Newbie here with question

Discussion in 'Photoshop Tutorials' started by Colleen, Jan 9, 2006.

  1. Colleen

    Colleen Guest

    I'm working with CS2 and love it EXCEPT for getting the calibration right on
    monitor to printer. The monitor is an LCD and the printer is an Epson Photo
    820. I'm having trouble getting the shadown and reds to be saturated enough
    in my photos. I've viewed them in proof settings...fine. I've calibrated
    the monitor (Adobe Gamma). I've calibrated the printer to the Epson Premium
    Lustre profile and let Photoshop manage the colors. It's frustrating.

    Oh, I'm not a puter techie but I am Philo's gf so if it's real technical
    talk to him.
    c
     
    Colleen, Jan 9, 2006
    #1
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  2. Colleen

    Tesco News Guest

    Hi.

    Suspect it is your Monitor Calibration that is the problem. Adobe Gamma does
    not really work with LCDs. They need to be calibrated using a Hardware
    device like an Eye One or Eye Two.

    Roy G
     
    Tesco News, Jan 9, 2006
    #2
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  3. Colleen

    Colleen Guest

    That's what I was thinking. Argh! More money. I dropped my new Casio 7.2
    megapixel camera the other day. Had to buy a new one. It was only a couple
    months old. Do NOT carry a camera that is in a case the same size as your
    wallet in your purse. (That is if you use a purse.)
    c
     
    Colleen, Jan 9, 2006
    #3
  4. Colleen

    Colleen Guest

    Okay, I worked backwards from the image TO the monitor and it's fine now.
    My monitor seems awfully pale to me but now what I see is what I get.
    c
     
    Colleen, Jan 10, 2006
    #4
  5. Colleen

    Tesco News Guest

    I don't use a purse, I mostly carry my Camera with the neck strap just wound
    round my wrist.

    I only ever dropped a camera once, and that was onto a concrete path, it
    still worked Ok, but they don't build cameras like that Miranda F, nowadays.

    If you don't want to buy one, you should be able to get someone to come in
    and Calibrate it for you, for a fairly modest fee. Locally here, you can
    get the Monitor and one Printer / Paper Profile done for £60.

    Roy G
     
    Tesco News, Jan 10, 2006
    #5
  6. Colleen

    Colleen Guest

    I belong to a photographers' social/professional group. We're having our
    monthly meeting tomorrow night. I'm going to ask around there as to
    pointers. I've got the callibration better but it still seems a little
    pale. I'm going to try to up the saturation within the images themselves.
    This is costing a small fortune in ink!
    c
     
    Colleen, Jan 10, 2006
    #6
  7. Colleen

    Hunt Guest

    That is probably correct for an LCD. To get my laptop to look half-way decent
    at only one viewing angle, the images print ~2/f dark. When I take them to the
    workstations from the laptop LCD, they look ~2/f dark. I only do basic on LCD,
    and ALL finals on CRTs.

    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Jan 10, 2006
    #7
  8. I call bull. Nonsense.
     
    Etaoin Shurdlu, Jan 10, 2006
    #8
  9. If you bought it using a credit card, it might have been insured against
    accidental damage for ninety days or so.

    Andrew
     
    Andrew Morton, Jan 10, 2006
    #9
  10. I don't like neck straps...I like hand straps. Neck straps let the camera
    swing around and hit things. If I need both hands free I put it in a bag.

    Can anyone really say that their systems are calibrated to where they see
    what will print? I say its impossible. Since you cannot see what will print
    then don't use the screen as a guide. Adjust your images by the
    numbers....but that is a big subject.
     
    Gene Palmiter, Jan 11, 2006
    #10
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