newbie, homework done, but NTSC->PAL confirmation?

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by Mysteriec, Jul 23, 2003.

  1. Mysteriec

    Mysteriec Guest

    Hi there,

    I've want to put some stuff I have on VHS tapes onto DVD in about 6
    months' time. I've been trying to do as much reading as I can about it
    in advance, and any help on the following issue would be greatly
    appreciated.

    I have some episodes of a favourite show of mine in NTSC format, but
    mostly in PAL. I want to end up with them all on PAL DVDs. This is
    where I think things get tricky.

    I *believe* the framerate for NTSC is 29.97 (or 24?) frames per second;
    whereas that for PAL is 25. I intend getting a Canopus ADVC-100,
    capturing either PAL or *true* NTSC as appropriate (not the strange
    hybrid my video player can send to the TV - PAL-60?).

    One solution then is simply to slow down the NTSC framerate to 25 frames
    per second. I believe this can be done, but obviously then the video
    and audio will be out of sync. Fortunately I have an (amateur!)
    background in audio, and am aware of the resources to make speed changes
    whilst preserving pitch as far as possible.

    A second solution, which I came across whilst reading the aDVanced DV
    converter manual, is to use a tool which interpolates the motion
    between fields, so that every 6 NTSC frames become 5 PAL ones. Am I
    correct in thinking this method therefore requires no sync correction?
    And am I also correct in thinking this is a feature other tools like
    TMPGenc, and Canopus Procoder use?

    It seems like a hell of a conversion, especially given that the pixels
    *also* have to be resized (from 720x480 to 720x576) - is the end result
    worth it, or is the best solution simply to slow down the frame rate,
    and tinker with the audio?

    As I stated, I've tried to do as much reading about this as possible (eg
    dvdrhelp.com site, plus several links from those), but I haven't
    actually seen an article which deals with this issue in great depth.
    Any links from those in the know would be greatly appreciated - or
    simply advice from experience!

    Many thanks!

    M.
     
    Mysteriec, Jul 23, 2003
    #1
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