Night Photography (again)

Discussion in 'Australia Photography' started by MJW, May 15, 2008.

  1. MJW

    MJW Guest

    I have this factory/plant nearby to where I live
    that looks quite impressive when lit up in the
    night. This is it by day,
    www.members.optusnet.com.au/mjwyllie/Factory.JPG

    I am keen to get down there at night or early in
    the morning ( on my way to work)to get some
    photos. I have a couple of questions regarding
    what settings I should use on my 350D.

    The manual says in Tv Shutter Priority mode, I can
    set it to 30 secs for night shots. is this enough?
    The next setting after this is Bulb, in which I
    can keep the shutter open as long as I have the
    button pressed (I have a remote switch). If this
    is better, how long should I hold the button for a
    good shot? Also, should I bump up the ISO?

    Any help/advice much appreciated.

    --
     
    MJW, May 15, 2008
    #1
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  2. MJW

    Mr.T Guest

    Only you will know after you have selected an aperture, and taken a meter
    reading, or trial shot.
    Since wasted digital shots cost nothing, why ask us rather than just trying
    various aperture/shutter speed/ISO combinations for yourself?

    How would we know exactly? What is the reason YOU can't try it for yourself?
    Isn't instant image review and histogram enough for you to make your own
    decision?
    Depends on how much noise you want, and whether there is anything moving
    that you don't want blurred.
    Once again, the reason you can't try any number of combinations for yourself
    is what exactly?

    My only advice is shoot just after sundown or just before sunrise, (will
    depend greatly on what lighting is on at those times)
    and make sure you have a tripod.

    MrT.
     
    Mr.T, May 15, 2008
    #2
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  3. MJW

    Rob. Guest

    Trial and error for the exposure, as this is the western side have a
    look and get some colour in the sky, early morning or evening, even some
    clouds to capture the sky.

    You have to find the right balance between the sky and the lights of the
    plant.

    Testing testing and see what's happening is the way you can learn.

    r
     
    Rob., May 15, 2008
    #3
  4. MJW

    MJW Guest

    Thanks Rob. I do intend to go out & have a go, was
    just looking for some pointers. The factory looks
    most effective when it is very dark out, has all
    its lights on & is billowing smoke or steam out
    from the side. This is what I want to capture!

    --
     
    MJW, May 15, 2008
    #4
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