Nikon 85mm f/1.8D vs. 85mm f/1.4D

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by DKFletcher, Jul 22, 2003.

  1. DKFletcher

    DKFletcher Guest

    Outside of the obvious speed difference has anybody shot with both lenses and
    have any thoughts. I'm looking for something fast for indoor use.

    Thanks for any input!

    Dirk
     
    DKFletcher, Jul 22, 2003
    #1
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  2. I have the f/1.8 version and I have tried the faster one for some
    portrait. I see no visible difference on common prints, but I have never
    tried a big enlargement. Since the price tag is quite different, I
    consider the f/1.8 a very cost effective lens. Unless you need the
    faster version, of course.
     
    Silvio Bacchetta, Jul 22, 2003
    #2
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  3. The f1.8 AF 85 Nikkor is so good at f1.8, it would be hard to
    believe the 1.4 AF could be better (and the 1.4 MF wasn't as
    good...) - but if it were as good, the 2/3rds or so stop of extra
    speed may be useful at times (I have found the f1.8 fast enough
    to replace the 1.4, though). For really low light, it is hard to beat
    a shorter FL lens for hand-holding, and one good at f2 can be
    used in lower light than the 85mm...
     
    David Ruether, Jul 22, 2003
    #3
  4. DKFletcher

    Marko B. Guest

    Get the 1.8 version and a flash :)

    m.
     
    Marko B., Jul 22, 2003
    #4
  5. DKFletcher

    NickC Guest

    If your in the available light spy game, get the 1.4D, if not, the
    1.8D is a darn good lens.

    Nick
     
    NickC, Jul 24, 2003
    #5
  6. DKFletcher

    T P Guest


    A good point, very well made. Have you tried using a monopod?

    I was rarely satisfied with the sharpness of my low shutter speed
    shots until I started using a good quality monopod.
     
    T P, Jul 24, 2003
    #6
  7. I've wondered about this issue myself. I mean, you pay a hell of lot
    for half a stop!
     
    Pete McCutchen, Jul 24, 2003
    #7
  8. With something like Portra 800, the 85 f/1.4 is on the ragged edge
    of hand holdability in typical medium to slightly dim interiors, ie
    1/90-1/100 second range. Losing another 2/3 of a stop with the f/1.8
    takes you to the 1/55-1/60 second range which is really too slow unless
    you can brace yourself against walls and door frames. I shoot a lot
    available light of candids at weddings and similar celebrations as my
    customers like the no-flash look and my lab adjusts the color balance.
    With the 85/1.4 I can get adequate sharpness for most (70%-80%) of my
    shots but the f/1.8 would be pretty hopeless. You might want to also
    try to pick up a 35/1.4 which is only available in MF but it really
    lets you shoot in dim interiors as you can go with a 1 1/3 stop slower
    shutter speed.
     
    Bob Kirkpatrick, Jul 25, 2003
    #8
  9. DKFletcher

    T P Guest


    The simple answer is to buy and use a monopod. I use mine for all
    except the posed formal wedding shots. I use a Monostat Extra Long
    with a Hassy 503CX and a Manfrotto 455B with the Leica.

    Once you get used to using a monopod it will almost never get in your
    way. It is now second nature to me to use one, and my (formerly) hand
    held shots are all now *pin sharp*.
     
    T P, Jul 25, 2003
    #9
  10. DKFletcher

    Rick Guest

    Tony,
    That was some good stuff that I used also. Thanks.
    If you look over some of the post, I had one Nikon 85mm v 28-105mm.
    Got some good stuff there too. DK, you may want to
    take a look also.

    Rick
     
    Rick, Jul 28, 2003
    #10
  11. DKFletcher

    T P Guest


    You're welcome.

    ;-)
     
    T P, Jul 28, 2003
    #11
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