Nikon D60 firmware

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Private, Feb 19, 2009.

  1. Private

    Private Guest

    I have been very happy with my Nikon D60, with the exception of one feature
    which IMHO think the hardware should support. I would like to be able to
    access the light meter while using my older Nikon AI MF lenses. I can use
    the camera with these lenses while in manual mode, but would like to be able
    to manually tell the light meter what aperture I have selected, and which I
    suspect that I should be able to do in the same manner and with the same
    controls as I use to set the aperture when using AF CPU equipped lenses. I
    suspect that this could be accomplished with a firmware upgrade but am
    unaware of a source for this and it is beyond my own skill set to write one.

    Can anyone point me to a source for such a firmware upgrade either from
    Nikon (best) or aftermarket?

    TIA
     
    Private, Feb 19, 2009
    #1
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  2. Private

    Bob Roberts Guest

    Nope, but if you find one let up know how it works out for you. Just
    before I read your post I was playing with my new/old Nikon 50mm micro
    on my D60 and thought the same as you. For now I chimp exposure but if
    I ever got around to finding that once in a lifetime fleeting
    multi-colored metal flake shiny bug I don't think it'll give me time
    for chimping.....so a proper micro/macro AF-S lens is in my future.

    Good Luck
     
    Bob Roberts, Feb 19, 2009
    #2
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  3. Private

    Guest Guest

    it's not just firmware. it needs a mechanical coupling pin.
     
    Guest, Feb 19, 2009
    #3
  4. Private

    Private Guest

    IIRC the D200 does have a hardware aperture ring index coupler and admit
    that would be ideal, but ISTM that the second best would be to have the
    ability to set the lens and camera aperture manually then have the benefit
    of an in camera light meter. I would be happy just to have the meter
    exposure indication, but suspect that once we have the exposure information
    it may also allow the camera to auto set shutter speed and maybe even TTL
    flash.

    I suspect that this functionality was rejected by Nikon marketing and not by
    software engineering. I submit that their motivation was likely to force
    customers to buy more $$ camera or new $$ lenses. If the software was open
    source then I suspect that reprogramming the firmware would be much easier
    but suspect that the source code is not available.

    Just MHO,
     
    Private, Feb 20, 2009
    #4
  5. Private

    Me Guest

    I agree sort of - without aperture coupling ring, then manual "stop
    down" metering should still be possible, but you would also need to be
    able to stop down the lens. IIRC the D60 has a DOF preview button, some
    other lower-end Nikon models didn't (D40/50?).
    I don't know if you're right about their motivation to do this. The
    same could be said about other features that you might want, but are
    only available on higher-end models. Some of those features are also
    firmware, some extra plastic buttons that would cost only a few cents to
    make (ie AF-fine tune or AF-On button).
    If firmware was open source, then I suspect that there might be quite a
    few problem posts on forums from tinkerers with dead nikon dslrs.
     
    Me, Feb 20, 2009
    #5
  6. Private

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : : > In article <y_jnl.14858$>, Private
    : >
    : >> I have been very happy with my Nikon D60, with the exception of one
    : >> feature
    : >> which IMHO think the hardware should support. I would like to be able to
    : >> access the light meter while using my older Nikon AI MF lenses. I can
    : >> use
    : >> the camera with these lenses while in manual mode, but would like to be
    : >> able
    : >> to manually tell the light meter what aperture I have selected, and which
    : >> I
    : >> suspect that I should be able to do in the same manner and with the same
    : >> controls as I use to set the aperture when using AF CPU equipped lenses.
    : >> I
    : >> suspect that this could be accomplished with a firmware upgrade but am
    : >> unaware of a source for this and it is beyond my own skill set to write
    : >> one.
    : >>
    : >> Can anyone point me to a source for such a firmware upgrade either from
    : >> Nikon (best) or aftermarket?
    : >
    : > it's not just firmware. it needs a mechanical coupling pin.
    :
    : IIRC the D200 does have a hardware aperture ring index coupler and admit
    : that would be ideal, but ISTM that the second best would be to have the
    : ability to set the lens and camera aperture manually then have the benefit
    : of an in camera light meter. I would be happy just to have the meter
    : exposure indication, but suspect that once we have the exposure information
    : it may also allow the camera to auto set shutter speed and maybe even TTL
    : flash.
    :
    : I suspect that this functionality was rejected by Nikon marketing and not by
    : software engineering. I submit that their motivation was likely to force
    : customers to buy more $$ camera or new $$ lenses. If the software was open
    : source then I suspect that reprogramming the firmware would be much easier
    : but suspect that the source code is not available.
    :
    : Just MHO,

    They probably don't think that most users would have the patience to do the
    manual settings. You may be an exception, but I suspect that they're right.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Feb 20, 2009
    #6
  7. Private

    Paul Furman Guest

    The thing that's unclear to me is - if you put a recycled cpu chip on an
    old manual Nikkor, it works fine on these bodies. Or maybe I'm
    misunderstanding that. The following comments reflect my confusion so
    it's a bit scattered <g>.

    There are two aperture coupling tabs, the D60 has one of them and I
    think it's enough.

    Here's a quote about a different model but it explains the principle:
    http://mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/nikonfmount/lens2.htm
    "Maximum aperture indexing lever (Lens Speed Indexing Lever) (16):
    This lever transmits the lens maximum aperture signal to the camera
    body. The lens maximum aperture is the main factor in deciding the
    amount of vignetting or light fall-off in the off-center areas. Because
    the FA measures the brightness in those off-center areas, the light
    metering level in the off-center areas must be compensated to provide
    correct light value data for the FA's automatic multi-pattern metering.
    And so this information on maximum aperture becomes indispensable for
    the FA's automatic metering system. Also, this signal is essential in
    determining the program line that is subject to change according to the
    lens maximum aperture. It is also used to display the correct f-number
    in the LCD in the S mode. Lenses without this signal (i.e. AI-modified
    Nikkor) will not display the selected f-number, instead, only "F..."
    will appear in the LCD."

    Now the D60 has a *maximum aperture indexing lever* but not a *meter
    coupling lever* (#3 in the numbered diagram on that page) which the D200
    & above do have. That lever on the outside of the mount catches on an
    older lenses aperture ring so it tells the camera how much the aperture
    ring is rotated.

    The *maximum aperture indexing lever* is confusingly named. That's the
    thing which holds the aperture open while you focus, then lets it loose
    when taking a photo. The oldest manual lenses needed an aperture ring
    because the aperture couldn't be set from the body but newer cameras do
    the spring release in a controlled way so the camera tells it where to
    stop rather than the lens aperture ring position acting as a stop. When
    mounting a medium-old lens on a newer camera, you have to set the
    aperture ring to min aperture & leave it there. The camera takes over
    and the ring only exists for old cameras.

    As best I can tell the *meter coupling lever* tells the camera at what
    point to stop the aperture as it swings shut during the shot. I really
    don't see why that couldn't be set in the menu since you set some stuff
    in the menu anyways on a D200 & above.

    Here's one more discussion:
    http://www.naturfotograf.com/ultra_micro55.html

    "even when I manage to coax such odd lenses into being mounted on my
    Nikons, using [scavenged cpu's], metering remains a big issue."

    "I also locked the nominal aperture permanently (at f/3.5 as it were),
    this is just a value and doesn't mean anything as long as stop-down
    metering is employed."

    And an old, hard to navigate but thorough reference:
    http://www.zi.ku.dk/personal/lhhansen/photo/fmount.htm


    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 20, 2009
    #7
  8. Private

    Bud Guest

    Bud, Feb 20, 2009
    #8
  9. Private

    Me Guest

    IIRC, the "transplanted" CPU chip needs to have been from a lens with
    the same maximum aperture.
    I don't think that tab on the D60 communicates maximum aperture, but
    confirms that minimum aperture is set on the lens.
    Hmmm - there's a slot on the face of the lens mount on "AI-S" lenses,
    and a corresponding pin that fits in that slot on an FA body (the pin
    looks like the end of a ballpoint pen). I had thought for "P" mode on
    the FA, the depth of that slot communicated focal length, but also told
    the body that the aperture ring had a standard linear action. I suspect
    the explanation above may be slightly wrong, and that with AI-s lenses,
    maximum aperture was communicated to the body via position of the
    aperture ring - and not by the explanation above (But I could be wrong
    on that - and I sold my FA long ago). The FA was advanced for the day,
    but expecting that they built in vignetting compensation in such a way
    to the early matrix metering system sounds unlikely.
    With pre-AI lenses modified for the FA, you could still read the scale
    on the aperture ring through the viewfinder - there was a window facing
    down to it under the prism housing.
     
    Me, Feb 20, 2009
    #9
  10. Private

    Me Guest

    Hmm - change that "maximum aperture" to "set" aperture on the ring, but
    still at a standard scale. So the (16) above also could tell the body
    maximum aperture, but I still don't buy in to the explanation about
    vignetting/metering, more probably so the body then knew when a lens was
    an f2.5 or 2.8, 1.8 or 1.4, etc when the ring was set for maximum aperture.
    The FA was advanced for the day,
     
    Me, Feb 20, 2009
    #10
  11. Private

    Paul Furman Guest

    OK here's the best answer I've seen for this:
    http://groups.google.com/group/rec....ad/8d7afc3844d5632d/c0335ad6c7dd8f3e?lnk=raot

    " David Kilpatrick wrote:
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
    Local: Mon, Jan 12 2009 5:09 pm
    Subject: Re: 85mm f1.4 vs 80-200mm f2.8

    The metering is read through the focusing screen. The screen does not
    accurately transmit any aperture wider than f4.5, as you can confirm by
    making manual exposure readings and closing the aperture between f4.5
    and f1.2 (even better, rig up a meter to read through the eyepiece, and
    you will see how seriously 'adjusted' by the focusing screen the faster
    apertures are).

    The aperture you need to set manually (in absence of proper couplings)
    will be specific to any one lens, and it will apply to any lens over a
    certain aperture - f2.8 or faster I'd guess.

    If you want to reduce the problem, fit a matt screen intended for wide
    aperture or long lenses (for more accurate focusing). I don't know what
    type this would be with Nikon but they should have one. It would need to
    be a screen which needed either a user-entered or factory adjustment for
    exposure once fitted.

    David "


    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 25, 2009
    #11
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