Nikon lens compatibility...

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Randy Howard, Dec 8, 2004.

  1. Randy Howard

    Randy Howard Guest

    I'm curious what problems (if any) one might encounter when moving
    from a Nikon F5 and SB28-DX speedlight system with mostly AF-S
    lenses and a few older "D" lenses to a D1, D2, D100, D70, etc.

    The "small print" seems to indicate there are some variations,
    and I'd kind of like to know how the lenses move across, and
    also if the speedlight will need to be replaced as well.

    If there is a good website that spells all of this out a
    link would be great.

    Thanks...
     
    Randy Howard, Dec 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Randy Howard

    Bruce Murphy Guest

    Lenses are fine, except for dealing with the crap factor, you're going
    to need a new speedlight with the new generation of nikon digital
    stuff (d2x,d2h.d70)

    B>
     
    Bruce Murphy, Dec 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. Randy Howard

    Randy Howard Guest

    "Crap factor" ??
    Thanks for responding so quickly. Need a new one to take advantage
    of new features, or "must have" to work at all? I'll probably
    spring for one anyway, but I've had to upgrade speedlights 3 or
    4 times over the years as feature creep from one body to the next,
    it's getting old.
     
    Randy Howard, Dec 8, 2004
    #3
  4. Randy Howard

    Bruce Murphy Guest

    *ahem* crop factor :)
    Need a new one to do TTL.
    I have a couple of older speedlights around which I'm going to play
    with using as background flashes etc. Of course, I don't need TTL for
    that.

    B>
     
    Bruce Murphy, Dec 8, 2004
    #4
  5. Randy Howard

    Randy Howard Guest

    That makes much more sense, thanks. :)
    Ok, presumably the newer models will work with an F5 just fine though,
    or so I would hope.
    Good idea.
     
    Randy Howard, Dec 8, 2004
    #5
  6. Randy Howard

    Bruce Murphy Guest

    Yes, the downside to this is the increasing manual size as they
    support more and more body families.

    You can probbal find specs/compatibility for these cameras and flashed
    on the nikon website.
    B>
     
    Bruce Murphy, Dec 8, 2004
    #6
  7. Randy Howard

    andrew29 Guest

    Should be fine with The D1/D1x, etc. The SB-28DX is the digital ready
    flash: either you got lucky or bought with foresight. The AF-S and D
    lenses will be fine.
    The lenses move across fine to the D1x. Non-CPU lenses won't work
    with matrix metering: you have to use centre weighted or spot instead.
    That's it, I think.

    You have to make allowances for the fact that the sensor is 23.7mm x
    15.6mm: you may find that 17-35 is no longer the wide angle you loved.

    Andrew.
     
    andrew29, Dec 8, 2004
    #7
  8. Randy Howard

    Bruce Murphy Guest

    The 28DX isn't happy with the D2X/H or D70.
    It varies with the camera. Did you read the other posts in this thread?

    B>
     
    Bruce Murphy, Dec 8, 2004
    #8
  9. Randy Howard

    Ron Lacey Guest

    Ron Lacey, Dec 8, 2004
    #9
  10. I have a Nikon 2008s that I bought in 1989 or early 1990. How well
    would the lenses I bought with it work with a D70? Will the auto focus
    work? How about the TTL metering and auto exposure adjustment?
     
    Michelle Steiner, Dec 8, 2004
    #10
  11. Randy Howard

    andrew29 Guest

    Oh, nasty. Is that for certain with regard to the D2x?
    Huh? I'm talking about the D1x.
    Yes.

    Andrew.
     
    andrew29, Dec 8, 2004
    #11
  12. For lenses:
    http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/nikon_articles/other/compatibility.html

    For flashes: (partial, hard to read unless printed)
    http://www.nikon-image.com/eng/speedlights/compatibility.pdf

    The D2x follows the same rules as the D2h and D70. For older models,
    if a speedlight has a DX suffix, it will work in dTTL mode with the
    D100 and D1 series. Otherwise, assume it will not work in TTL mode
    with a Nikon dSLR.
     
    Michael Benveniste, Dec 8, 2004
    #12
  13. Randy Howard

    Jeremy Nixon Guest

    Lenses from that era will work fine with the D70. I've got a couple
    myself. The only thing you likely won't get is the "D" distance stuff
    for 3D matrix metering, which I've never seen to actually matter anyway,
    and for flash metering, where it might actually make some difference.
    But it general the "D" stuff isn't anything to care about.
     
    Jeremy Nixon, Dec 9, 2004
    #13
  14. Lenses from that era will work fine with the D70. I've got a couple
    myself. The only thing you likely won't get is the "D" distance
    stuff for 3D matrix metering, which I've never seen to actually
    matter anyway, and for flash metering, where it might actually make
    some difference. But it general the "D" stuff isn't anything to care
    about.[/QUOTE]

    Thanks. Now all I have to do is convince myself that I can afford the
    camera.

    I can get a very good deal on it; 10% off the price of the camera or of
    the camera and lens combo, plus the $100 rebate from Nikon. All that
    plus no sales tax or shipping charges.

    $1299 * 0.9 = $1169.10 - $100 = 1069.10
    $999 * 0.9 = $899.10 - $100 = 799.10

    And I have only about three weeks to decide. <sigh>

    Decisions, decisions...
     
    Michelle Steiner, Dec 9, 2004
    #14
  15. Randy Howard

    Peter Hirons Guest

    That's the description of the brains of the people who think they're
    getting some magic "magnification" of the focal length of the lens.

    Peter
     
    Peter Hirons, Dec 12, 2004
    #15
  16. Randy Howard

    Bruce Murphy Guest

    From the point of view of field of view, that's exactly what you're
    getting, particularly when you get your crop onto a sensor that
    provides similar quality to some films you might have used _full
    frame_

    It all depends on what you mean when you refer to 'focal length'.

    B>
     
    Bruce Murphy, Dec 13, 2004
    #16
  17. Randy Howard

    John Francis Guest

    Are you sure about that?

    If you stand in the same place with your 300mm on your F5 and a 200mm
    on the D100, make an exposure on each one, and print them both up to
    the same size print, you might be surprised. Don't forget that the
    extra enlargement from the cropped image size also affects perceived
    depth of field.
     
    John Francis, Dec 16, 2004
    #17
  18. Randy Howard

    Peter Hirons Guest

    It depends on your definition of "quality". Again I think it's marketing
    hype from the likes of Canon claiming MF quality.
    By focal length I mean exactly what I say - you can't change the laws of
    physics.

    There is a lot more to the optics of a lens than just an arbitrarily
    chosen area to focus it onto. Depth of field being the main difference -
    it will not be the same if you put a 300mm on an F5 and a 200mm on a D100
    (same apertures of course).

    As well as film and digital 35mm kit, I use an MF body with 6x4.5 6x7 and
    6x8 (all centimetres) backs. Changing the back does not alter the focal
    length of the lens and nobody in the MF world would ever be heard saying
    that it does. Swapping a lens from an F5 to a D100 is an equivalent
    action.

    As I've said before on other newsgroups - "magnification" is an invention
    of marketing types who wanted something more positive-sounding than
    "crop". Unfortunately it's been taken up by those who want to convince
    their boss/the bank manager/their wife/their mates/themselves that the
    purchase was a "good thing".

    Peter
     
    Peter Hirons, Dec 16, 2004
    #18
  19. Randy Howard

    Peter Hirons Guest

    Absolutely! Search the web for "depth of field calculation" and do some
    reading. I don't have time to explain the maths right now - I need to get
    to bed as I have about 22 hours' travelling tomorrow - that's about 18
    hours' driving and the rest on ferries (Netherlands to Ireland)!
    I have done it and I would only be surprised if they were the same :)


    Peter
     
    Peter Hirons, Dec 16, 2004
    #19
  20. Randy Howard

    Bruce Murphy Guest

    And I think you'd be an idiot if you didn't admit that consumer
    digital SLRs have passed the quality points of numerous 35mm consumer
    films already. Kodak MAX 400, anyone?

    On the contrary, people go around changing them all the
    time. Regardless, the majority of people are talking abotu 'a focal
    length effect' not the 'focal length'. If this weren't the case then
    they'd be running around talking about how much their focal length
    changed in this or that lens.
    Yes, obviously. Do you know what it /will/ be the same with?
    Yes, we know. See above for qualifications on statement.
    And now you extrapolate from 'digital magnification is a misnomer' out
    to 'all digital it bad'. Great.

    B>
     
    Bruce Murphy, Dec 17, 2004
    #20
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