Nikon SB-600 Speedlight - Battery Recommendations

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by AlanW, May 23, 2008.

  1. AlanW

    AlanW Guest

    I have a D70s and am considering the Nikon SB-600 Speedlight since the
    camera will fire the remote speedlight. I will need rechargeable
    batteries and a charger. What type of battery or charger would you
    recommend? Thanks,
    Alan
     
    AlanW, May 23, 2008
    #1
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  2. AlanW

    Guest Guest

    get nimh batteries, and possibly eneloops if you don't use the flash
    that often and don't want to worry about self-discharge of the
    batteries. for a charger, the maha 9000 is fairly slick, but probably
    overkill for most people.
     
    Guest, May 23, 2008
    #2
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  3. I agree, but definitely eneloops (or an equivalent like hybrio). Get an
    "intelligent" charger so you can put batteries in and they will be charged
    and monitored individually so you can forget about them. Mine is an Ansmann
    energy 8 but there are plenty to choose from.

    HTH. Geoff.
     
    Geoff. Hayward, May 23, 2008
    #3
  4. AlanW

    me Guest


    I agree with the eneloop suggestion. I've used nimhs that were used in the
    battery grip of my old CP-5700 and the CP-990 until they crapped out in my
    SB-800. These were then replaced by eneloops for their much lower self
    discharge rate.
     
    me, May 23, 2008
    #4
  5. AlanW

    Frank Arthur Guest

    Do not use rechargeables. Use sets of regular AA Duracells. If you are
    an average user you probably will go through 2 sets of batteries.
    Why would you want to spend hours recharging expensive batteries that
    deplete rapidly as they sit around between shots?
     
    Frank Arthur, May 23, 2008
    #5
  6. AlanW

    Guest Guest

    sanyo eneloops (or equivalent) not only do not deplete between shots,
    they don't deplete sitting idle when not shooting at all. recycle time
    is also faster with nimh batteries.

    and needing 2 (or more) sets of batteries has nothing to do with using
    rechargables, alkaline or lithium. get as many sets as needed.
     
    Guest, May 23, 2008
    #6
  7. AlanW

    Frank Arthur Guest

    I meant to add "two sets of batteries per year". At about $4 a set..
    No costly charger, no expensive batteries, no hours of recharging and
    plugging into a wall outlet- plus complete portability.
    I got out of the battery charging business & back to photography.
    I had invested in Powerex Batteries & Charger. Spent a lot of money
    and time and all of this detracted from the enjoyment of photography.
    Life is a lot simpler now. I can always pick up a set of Duracell AA's
    in Oregon, Chicago or
    Boca Raton or Smallville.
     
    Frank Arthur, May 23, 2008
    #7
  8. AlanW

    Guest Guest

    rechargable batteries and chargers are not that expensive unless one
    gets one of the super-fancy chargers.

    also, if someone is only going through two sets of batteries per year
    for a flash, then perhaps alkaline or lithium is a better choice. and
    with so few flash photos, i'd question the need for an external flash
    at all. presumably, the original poster plans to shoot quite a bit
    more than that.
     
    Guest, May 23, 2008
    #8
  9. AlanW

    Steve Guest

    I can really recommend the Maha MH-C204W charger and any decent NiMH
    AA batteries. It's small, light, fits easily in even a small camera
    bag, charges 2 or 4 AA quickly, fully and safely. It's the best
    travel AA NiMH charger, really a great comprimise between size/weight
    and charging speed and works on international AC with just different
    plug adapters. And if you're using it for SB-600 batteries like I do,
    you probably also have a Nikon battery charger which takes the same
    power cord as the MH-C204W. That cuts down even more what you have to
    carry in a small camera bag even though it means you can't charge the
    camera battery and flash batteries at the same time. But if traveling
    light, it's a plus. It can do reconditioning and revive old batteries
    too. And it's fairly cheap. I got one for under $30 on ebay. I know
    I sound like a commercial, but I really like this charger as much as
    someone can like a charger.

    Steve
     
    Steve, May 23, 2008
    #9
  10. AlanW

    Steve Guest

    I can see advantages of regular alkaline AAs (I keep a box of 4 in my
    bag "just in case" because they last in storage so long) but cost
    isn't one of them. Maybe film shooters can get a long life from
    regular duracell flash batteries. But from what I see of "average"
    digital camera users, 2 sets of batteries wouldn't last very long.
    Those "expensive" NiMH batteries and a charger would pay for
    themselves very quickly.

    Steve
     
    Steve, May 23, 2008
    #10
  11. AlanW

    me Guest

    Well then you don't use your flash much, if that's all you need. There are
    times I'd go through this in a month.
    Just as I can recharge my batts there as well. AND I also have your option
    as a fall back as well if need be. So what's the downside for those of us
    who actually use our flash a bit??
     
    me, May 23, 2008
    #11
  12. AlanW

    Frank Arthur Guest

    Be my guest. I am not saying YOU shouldn't buy rechargeables. All I am
    saying is that ,for ME, or a person taking occasional flash shots, who
    are not using up more than 2 sets of batteries a year and don't need
    the bother of recharger etc.
     
    Frank Arthur, May 23, 2008
    #12
  13. I used high energy rechargaeable NiMH batteries in my SB600, they were 2100
    mAh rated - after about forty flashes during a wedding I attended, the flash
    gun overheated and burnt out. I really like the SB600, so I sent it off for
    repair (it cost me £90 to get it repaired) , when I got it back after
    repair, I was told NEVER use high energy rechargeable batteries with the
    SB600, always use Duiracells or equivalent as they release energy more
    evenly and do not cause the overheating problem which my SB600 suffered
    while using rechargeables. Since then I have used Alkalines with the
    flashgun and I have taken thousands of photographs with it, with absolutrely
    no problems - sometimes rechargeables can be a bad choice.
     
    Nigel Cummings, May 24, 2008
    #13
  14. Geoff.
     
    Geoff. Hayward, May 24, 2008
    #14
  15. AlanW

    Guest Guest

    that probably had more to do with shooting 40 flashes in rapid
    succession. nikon suggests a 10 minute cool down period after a number
    of flashes (see the manual). this is typical with most flashes.
     
    Guest, May 25, 2008
    #15
  16. AlanW

    Dimitris M Guest

    8 eneloop batteries (2 sets) http://www.eneloop.info/
    and a MAHA MH-C9000
    http://www.mahaenergy.com/store/viewItem.asp?idProduct=423
    or a MAHA MH-C401FS
    http://www.mahaenergy.com/store/viewItem.asp?idProduct=178

    I suggest the second charger C401 as it is more easy to use, amost half the
    price and the car adapter is included. The 9000 is better as analyser.

    Do not buy conventional ???? batteries, as they suffer from self discharge.
    Enellops can be charged and stay charged for about 2 years. Conventional
    NiMH for 2-4 weeks.
     
    Dimitris M, May 29, 2008
    #16
  17. AlanW

    Dimitris M Guest

    Do not buy conventional ???? batteries, as ......

    Do not buy conventional NiMH batteries, as .....
     
    Dimitris M, May 30, 2008
    #17
  18. AlanW

    Dimitris M Guest

    You have right if someome can use the flash so rarelly. But i can not
    imagine that someone buys the SB600-800 for a few hunded flashes a year. I
    am not a pro, but if I had to use not rechargeables, I should must buy more
    than 30 sets per year. Especially as I uses the flash for fill-in in
    daylight. Another serious problem of the alcalines is the increased internal
    resistance that can increase dramatically the flash charge time.
     
    Dimitris M, Jun 3, 2008
    #18
  19. AlanW

    Dimitris M Guest

    (I keep a box of 4 in my
    enelloops last the same. I also keep spare backup batteries, but all, master
    and spare are eneloops. The alkaline are restricted only to telecontrols for
    home TV, DVD, air condition etc. Anywhere the consumption is extremely low
    and the batteries should be changed every 2 years.
     
    Dimitris M, Jun 3, 2008
    #19
  20. AlanW

    Steve Guest

    I'm not going to waste a set of 4 eneloops to keep in a pack and never
    use as my "just in case" backup set. Besides, after a year, an
    eneloop is down to 85% whereas alkalines, stored at room temp, self
    discharge at only about 2% per year. So for a long term backup set,
    eneloops don't make much sense.

    Steve
     
    Steve, Jun 4, 2008
    #20
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