OBSERVATIONS ON THE DRYING OF PAPER

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Lloyd usenet-Erlick, Jan 30, 2005.

  1. jan3005 from Lloyd Erlick,

    I came across the following article while drifting on
    the net.

    I haven't had a chance to read it thoroughly yet, but
    it may be of interest.

    It has a section on flattening paper, too.

    It does not deal specifically with photo papers.

    Sorry for all-caps, it's that way in the original.


    http://aic.stanford.edu/jaic/articles/jaic31-02-003_4.html
    journal of the American Institute for conservation
    JAIC 1992, Volume 31, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 175 to
    197)


    OBSERVATIONS ON THE DRYING OF PAPER: FIVE DRYING
    METHODS AND THE DRYING PROCESS
    JANE E. SUGARMAN, & TIMOTHY J. VITALE


    regards,
    --le
    ________________________________
    Lloyd Erlick Portraits, Toronto.
    voice: 416-686-0326
    email:
    net: www.heylloyd.com
    ________________________________
    --
     
    Lloyd usenet-Erlick, Jan 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. Lloyd usenet-Erlick

    PGG Guest

    Lloyd,

    As with your single-tray method, I also use your method of simply clipping
    the prints, with a plastic clip, and letting them just hang and dry. They
    curl a tad, but pop them in the dry-mount press for 10 seconds and
    everything is good. Who needs a fancy drying method??

    PGG
     
    PGG, Jan 31, 2005
    #2
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  3. This is an interesting article but it refers to drying
    plain paper, not photographic paper. Photographic paper
    ("fiber" paper) is coated on one side with a gelatin sizing
    (baryta) and the emulsion as well as a protective top
    coating of gelatin. This changes its drying characteristics
    significantly so that the relative results found for raw
    paper may not be true of unprotected (i.e., non resin
    coated) photographic paper.
     
    Richard Knoppow, Feb 1, 2005
    #3
  4. ....

    jan3105 from Lloyd Erlick,

    Indeed! Not me, that's for sure. I built a bunch of
    drying screens - about six cubic feet worth - and
    discarded the fool things. Filthy idea, they are.

    I came across the article I mentioned here by chance,
    and posted the URL just for interest. The people behind
    it are conservators, and are concerned with historical
    papers of various kinds, I think. I'm not suggesting
    darkroom people adopt fancy techniques; I advocate an
    easy, simple and effective method, namely the one you
    refer to.

    regards,
    --le
    ________________________________
    Lloyd Erlick Portraits, Toronto.
    voice: 416-686-0326
    email:
    net: www.heylloyd.com
    ________________________________
    --
     
    Lloyd usenet-Erlick, Feb 1, 2005
    #4
  5. Lloyd usenet-Erlick

    dan.c.quinn Guest

    I thought it interesting how dry the paper can be prior
    to distorting. I do pre-dry then place in my special
    blotter stack. Air dry then humidify should be an
    easy method. Will it work though?

    I think that reaserch group missed the boat. No mention
    at all of screens, hydrophobic, or A flute ventilation class
    corrugate board. Dan
     
    dan.c.quinn, Feb 3, 2005
    #5
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