Old camera & lenses

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by M J Wyllie, Feb 20, 2010.

  1. M J Wyllie

    M J Wyllie Guest

    My mother-in-law has just given me a whole heap of old camera equipment. Amongst all this is a
    Pentax ME Super, film camera with 50mm, 28mm lenses + a 2x teleconverter. Have bought some film & am
    going to give it a go.

    Amongst the other stuff is a *very* old Revere 8, model 44 wind-up video camera, 3 x 42mm Rodenstock
    TV-Heligon lenses & 1 x 75mm Rodenstock XR-Heligon lens!

    Questions! What are the Rodenstocks used for? They have a very large thread, the size of the lens
    body itself, no focusing rings, & the 75mm actually has a brass gear mounted on it! The weight of
    the 75mm is more than that of my 450D + any lens attached!

    Now, I have been told to chuck out whatever I don't want, so i'm asking, a) is this stuff worth
    anything? b) if not, is it of any use to anyone here in this group?

    I can supply pictures if anyone's curious enough.
     
    M J Wyllie, Feb 20, 2010
    #1
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  2. Just so you know, that's a *movie* camera (8mm, probably not super-8).
    Weren't any "video" cameras back then.

    Using the right terms might help you dispose of your little treasure trove.
    The 75mm is a fairly long telephoto lens; keep in mind that a normal
    lens for 8mm is about about 12-15mm, so the 75mm is equivalent to a
    250-300mm lens for a 35mm camera.
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 20, 2010
    #2
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  3. M J Wyllie

    Paul Furman Guest

    I'll take one each of the Rodenstocks please :)

    I believe they were used to project cathode rays on TV screens,
    oscilloscopes and X-ray machines and are super-fast with ridiculously
    shallow depth of field, only usable for extreme closeups, no infinity focus.
    http://foto.no/cgi-bin/bruker/dittnavn/layout1/show_kategori_index.cgi?serieid=622&brukerid=336

    Perhaps more usable on the movie camera with shorter flange mount distance?
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 20, 2010
    #3
  4. M J Wyllie

    M J Wyllie Guest

    Thanks for that! I did a quick search on it & wow, its pretty old!
    Haha, I don't think i'm goin to retire on this one! Just seems a waste to bin stuff if it could be
    of use to someone else. One mans trash etc etc.
    They look too big for the "movie camera", & the threads suggest that there must be some sort of
    adapter for whatever they connect to! Will get some pictures happening shortly.
     
    M J Wyllie, Feb 20, 2010
    #4
  5. M J Wyllie

    M J Wyllie Guest

    On their way!!!!
    You know, that seems to be the story! If I look through the lens, at my keyboard, I have to be right
    on the letter to see it clearly! If I go outside & look through it, nothings in focus.
    Can't see how they would mount. Strange as to why someone would have them? My mum-in-law got em off
    a friend of a friend, who she told I was interested in photography.
     
    M J Wyllie, Feb 20, 2010
    #5
  6. my keyboard, I have to be right
    Rodenstock are fairly famous for projector lenses. Slide projectors,
    film projectors, darkroom enlargers with Rodenstock optics used to be
    the cream of the crop as I remember it.

    -P.
     
    Peter Huebner, Feb 20, 2010
    #6
  7. M J Wyllie

    Joe Makowiec Guest

    If memory serves, Rodenstock supplied the original-equipment lenses for
    Omega enlargers. What you really wanted, if you could afford it, was an
    El-Nikkor.
     
    Joe Makowiec, Feb 20, 2010
    #7
  8. M J Wyllie

    Rol_Lei Nut Guest

    LOL! Maybe what *you* really wanted...
    Unless you're talking about the low end Rodenstocks...

    The 6 element Nikkor was good, but no match for Rodagons and Componons
    (and even some other Japanese made lenses). The 4 element Nikkor was
    pretty trashy (below average for a 4-element)
     
    Rol_Lei Nut, Feb 20, 2010
    #8
  9. M J Wyllie

    Paul Furman Guest

    That's
    Paul Furman
    4236 25th Street #11
    San Francisco, CA 94114
    Thanks :)
    (415) 722-6037


    Seriously though, I'm very interested in those.
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 20, 2010
    #9
  10. Hey, didn't know you were over there in, what? Noe Valley? Across the
    Bay here in Oaktown.
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 20, 2010
    #10
  11. M J Wyllie

    Paul Furman Guest

    Yep!

    BTW, I've got the address & phone on the bottom header of all my web
    Oh yeah, right, we were talking about camera shops & places to develop film.
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 20, 2010
    #11
  12. My current processor is the "Foto Shop" in downtown Berkeley. Small
    shop, owner stil makes optical prints rather than digital (Frontier,
    etc.). Very nice work.

    I've been meaning to look into Photoworks, on Market in the City.
    (http://www.photoworkssf.com) I've got their price sheets but haven't
    had them do any work yet.) Do you know anything about them?
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 20, 2010
    #12
  13. M J Wyllie

    Paul Furman Guest

    I've noticed them, I should try 'cause it's close & convenient. Hmm,
    actually what looks useful is their mail-order film processing, $5/roll
    plus: Deluxe Scan (high res) - $8.00/roll for my recent film tinkering.
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 20, 2010
    #13
  14. M J Wyllie

    M J Wyllie Guest

    M J Wyllie, Feb 27, 2010
    #14
  15. M J Wyllie

    Paul Furman Guest

    So I got the lenses last week, they were pretty beat up so I'm glad I
    didn't pay more than shipping <grin>. First tests at home looked
    hideously useless with very low contrast but I finally got them out in
    the sun and it's pretty cool. I haven't figured out a proper mount for
    the 42mm ones yet, I did disassemble two of them though, fun to tinker &
    learn about optics.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/edgehill/sets/72157623476632909/detail/

    I also played around with a webcam with the lens unscrewed to see how
    they work at the proper focal distance and did not get very good results
    at any setting but I guess maybe they are only intended to get a rough
    CRT image up to size in very low light, not fine detail.
     
    Paul Furman, Mar 11, 2010
    #15
  16. M J Wyllie

    Paul Furman Guest

    Ya, it's nice really to be able to blow out the background to oblivion.
    With bright contrasting backgrounds, it's easy to make very dreamy
    impressionistic images although to be honest, one can get a very similar
    look from a 50mm f/1.8 on extension tubes with much better sharpness.
    These Heligons do give a wider view and even more extreme results
    though. I didn't include the ones with more outrageously freaky corner
    aberration problems <g>. OK I just added one of those:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/edgehill/4425935348/sizes/o/in/set-72157623476632909/
     
    Paul Furman, Mar 11, 2010
    #16
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