Olympus D-510 Bluez

Discussion in 'Olympus' started by The Magician, Oct 8, 2003.

  1. The Magician

    The Magician Guest

    I have an Olympus D-510 for about a year now, and it's my first digital
    cam.
    For all intents and puposes...I'm fairly disappointed with it.
    Two major outpoints are camera shake, and mostly...*Night Pix*.
    I'm not a pro photographer and have tried to read manuals, and tutorials
    online without really understanding them, and have tried every setting I
    can seem to find on the camera. But living across from NYC for
    instance...I can great a GREAT shot of the city during the day...but it
    comes out grainy and very unsharp at nite.
    I try all the ISO settings,flash and no flash,sharp, normal and soft
    settings, normal, macro, and infinity settings, a tripod...and almost
    every combo I can think of.
    I mostly use no flash/infinity settings for nite pix.
    Also I get a lot of movement blur even in day shots unless I stand
    perfectly still, and don't breath...and STILL sometimes get blur.
    (a friend of mine who's an amatuer to pro photog, had his company's
    $2000. Cannon pro cam down to take nite pix of the light beams from
    "Ground Zero" a bit ago, and while the pix on this 6 megapixel camera
    were lots clearer than mine....I was less than impressed by a camera
    costing so much. The pix were sharp...but not as some shots I've seen
    done with film cams.)
    Is it that my cam is only 2.1 megapixels?
    Is it just that all digital cameras SUCK for nite shots?
    I paid a fair amount of money for this camera and feel like I woulda
    maybe gotten better pix with a cheaper film cam, but don't want to give
    up on digitals. But I don't wanna shell out even MORE money on one with
    higher pixels if I'm gonna get the same results.
    Anyone else have this camera who gets pretty good nite shots have some
    pointers?
    Thanks!
    The Magician

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers
    exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here...
    it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.
    There is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
    The Magician, Oct 8, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. The Magician

    The Magician Guest

    Ya missed the part above that mentions ...a tripod.
    Uh...yep...I use a tripod.
    Sorry...yeah...he used a tripod.
    Great shot!
    But it ain't with an Olympus D-510.
    Mine's an Olympus D-510, that I use WITH A TRIPOD...
    dat comes out like shit.
    See this link:

    http://www.themagician8.com/niteshotz.htm

    That's the point that pisses me off...is that it SHOULD be "point and
    shoot"...but comes out either blurry, grainy, or just plain unsharp.
    Even with...a tripod.

    Is it the camera, not enuff megapixels, a setting I'm overlooking...
    or what?
    Appreciate your trying to help...but would really like to hear from folks
    with the *same* camera, to give me ideas (and possibly show examples)on
    how to get better nite shots.
    Thanks.
    The Magician


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers
    exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here...
    it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more
    bizarre and inexplicable.
    There is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
    The Magician, Oct 8, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. The Magician

    C0mdrData Guest

    I also have the D510...but I must admit I have not tried any night shots.
    As much as I love this camera, it is probably the wrong one for what you
    want to do. The problem is not the number of pixels...2 Megapixels is
    plenty for a good picture, provided you don't print out too large. I have
    several 8 x 10's hanging around my home shot with this camera. The problem
    is the shutter speed limitation. To get a good night photograph with the
    camera on a tripod, you should set it manually to ISO 100. The problem is
    once you do that, the needed shutter speed becomes too long because the lens
    is not particularly fast...especially if you zoom. I say its "too" long
    only because the camera can't do it. The shutter on the 510 only goes to
    1/2 second....and that's not long enough for what you are doing.

    If you decide to replace it, pay more attention to the lens speed (fast) and
    shutter speed (slow) than to the number of pixels.
     
    C0mdrData, Oct 8, 2003
    #3
  4. The Magician

    The Magician Guest


    Hmmm...interesting. But is there no solution for getting a better nite
    pix with this cam? Also...I don't really understand what "ISO" is for
    exactly. I kinda know it's a film speed in 35mm cams but really don't
    know which speed is better for what. If ISO 100 is better for nite
    shots...what would I use the other 2 settings for primarily?
    Should I just set it to "AUTO" for normal shots?
    (which I normally have it set for)
    Cuz I also noticed sometimes even day and indoor shots come out with a
    blur.
    Mainly from slight movement. Which pisses me off...cuz normal "point and
    shoot" shots come out blurred alot due to movement. And this is a near
    $300. camera. I got better P&S shots from a cheap disposable!
    Should I play around more with the ISO settings...if so...How and when?
    Thanks for your reply and help!
    The Magician

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers
    exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here...
    it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more
    bizarre and inexplicable.
    There is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
    The Magician, Oct 8, 2003
    #4
  5. The Magician

    C0mdrData Guest

    I don't think so...its just not what it was designed for.


    Also...I don't really understand what "ISO" is for
    The ISO settings in a digital camera act the same way as changing film in a
    regular camera. In other words, wereas you would purchase a higher ISO film
    and use it in a standard camera, you would accomplish the same thing in a
    digital by changing the settings. I find this at times to be an extremely
    valuable feature...even more so than manual overide or exposure
    compensation.

    The "auto" setting for ISO is unique to digital. At least I have never had
    a point and shoot 35mm go to the store and choose film for me!! It
    functions like many automatic things do...a reasonable compromise MOST of
    the time. Unfortunately night shots contain a lot of large dark
    spaces...just the kind of thing that tends to show grain. (or whatever the
    equivalent of grain is called in the digital world).
    Well you may have answered your own question. I tend to use the ISO 400
    setting for action shots...kids soccer, etc. It helps to stop movement.

    The wonderful thing about digital is that your experiments don't cost
    anything. Play around with the settings and learn. Try to concentrate on
    what the camera does do well. My favorite shot with this camera is an 8 X
    10 hanging above my computer of a single rose shot right after a brief rain
    shower. It is tack sharp, and compares favorably with prints made from
    Kodachromes hanging alongside. I used the Macro mode, all other settings
    were on auto...the EXIF indicates the camera set itself for ISO 100 and no
    flash.

    Anytime
     
    C0mdrData, Oct 9, 2003
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.