Optical Quality of D series lenses

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Peter Charles, Oct 6, 2007.

  1. Back in the '80s I was a big Pentax user and loved their glass. Now I find
    myself a Pentax user once more, only with a K10D. Love the camera, can't
    stand the glass (plastic, whatever). When it comes to distortion, my 16-45
    is a coke bottle at the 16 end and don't get me started about CA. Abandon
    the zooms for some prime lenses? Looking at some reviews of the 14 mm and
    it's no roaring hell either, pretty bad distortion. I remember my old SMC
    18mm f3.5 and an 8 X 12 enlargement of an office tower would yield zero
    distortion.

    Looking at some reviews of other manufacturers' D series lenses and I don't
    see any great standouts there either.

    This is my first foray into the DSLR world, having shelved my old manual
    everything Nikons. Not impressed so far.


    Peter Charles
     
    Peter Charles, Oct 6, 2007
    #1
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  2. Peter Charles

    Pete D Guest


    If wide is that important to you then you really have bought the wrong
    camera, only a "full frame" camera will do what you need it would seem.

    All those lovely Nikon lenses that you have shelved will be usefull on the
    K10D though, which ones have you got?

    Try a Nikon D3 or Canon 5D.

    Cheers.

    Pete
     
    Pete D, Oct 7, 2007
    #2
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  3. Pete

    I don't see any necessity for a relationship between frame size and optical
    quality, but if you're implying that manufacturers aren't trying hard as
    they have identified this segment as "dumbed down" then you have my
    agreement.

    I'm hoping I can score a few old SMC-A lenses, though they won't help me at
    the wide end. My photography these days is more limited compared to the
    '80s and '90s, so I can make do with what I have now, but I hate seeing a
    great shot ruined by crappy optics, and it has happened enough to start
    getting under my skin.

    Though I really have not much use for PS CS3, I might have to get a copy
    just to handle the CA problem. My Aperture software doesn't have CA
    correction.

    For Nikon glass, I have the 24 f2.8, 35 f2.8, 55 f3.5, 85 f2, and 180 f2.8,
    used on an FE2 and an EL2.

    Peter
     
    Peter Charles, Oct 7, 2007
    #3
  4. Peter Charles

    nsag Guest

    When people say its not the money it's the principle, it's the money.
    When people blame the lens for their "crappy shot" the problem is rarely due
    to the lens.
    The amount of linear distortion in these lenses is not much different than
    in comparably priced optics for full frame film cameras.
    Linear distortion is easily corrected, but you would have to learn about
    digital image processing and get out of the point and shoot paradigm.
    Chromatic distortion is an issue that plagues high contrast shots with low
    priced wide angle dSLR zooms but is not likely to irrevocably ruin many
    amateur masterpieces. Annoying, yes, but generally only in small areas of
    big enlargements.

    How did anyone ever create memorable photo images in decades past
    considering how awful the lenses and film stocks were by contemporary
    standards?
     
    nsag, Oct 7, 2007
    #4
  5. Peter Charles

    Paul Furman Guest

    That's supposed to be a really nice lens.

    BTW ca is less of a problem on crop frame DSLRs because the corners are
    cropped off.
     
    Paul Furman, Oct 7, 2007
    #5
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