OT - Photographing at "The Rock"

Discussion in 'Australia Photography' started by Rob Wild, Aug 7, 2003.

  1. Rob Wild

    Rob Wild Guest

    Just for those interested, there is an article on Page 5 of the
    Australian for today (Thursday Aug 7 2003) relating to the censorship of
    taking photographs of Ularu/Ayers Rock/The big tourist attaction 200km
    west of Alice Springs.

    A quick summary is that it looks like the tourism industry may take on
    the local aboriginal council and the NT government regarding the
    inconsistant application of the "No Photo" rules (seemingly dependant on
    "donations" to the communities).

    Will be interesting to see what happens. Not wanting to start a flame
    war, but just thought that I would post it for those interested in these
    developments of photographic censorship of landmarks / tourist
    attractions.
     
    Rob Wild, Aug 7, 2003
    #1
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  2. visit the website and say you went
     
    Warren Prasek, Aug 7, 2003
    #2
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  3. Rob Wild

    Kload Guest

    As I understand there are there limitations for photographing Uluru

    1. No photos at all of sacred sites (which are a small part of the rock
    overall and from a practical stand point this rule only applies when you
    are near the rock - there is no way of excluding sacred sites from your
    photos if you are further away.)
    2. For commercial photography you need to get a permit and pay some
    relatively small fee.
    3. No commercial photography of the sunrise side. You can take all the
    personal photos you want and you can give them away, but you can't sell
    them.

    I don't see any problem with these limitations. A bit of planning ahead
    will keep commercial photographers out of trouble, and in my opinion the
    sunset side probably provides better photo opportunities. Besides, in a
    close up its pretty hard to tell one side of the rock from the other.

    There is one further limitation which is a bit of a concern from a
    journalistic view point in that commercial photography can not give a
    "negative impression" (forget the exact wording). This is something
    that needs to be resolved. A journalist should be able to report the
    true situation.
     
    Kload, Aug 7, 2003
    #3
  4. Rob Wild

    Kload Guest

    As I understand there are there limitations for photographing Uluru

    1. No photos at all of sacred sites (which are a small part of the rock
    overall and from a practical stand point this rule only applies when you
    are near the rock - there is no way of excluding sacred sites from your
    photos if you are further away.)
    2. For commercial photography you need to get a permit and pay some
    relatively small fee.
    3. No commercial photography of the sunrise side. You can take all the
    personal photos you want and you can give them away, but you can't sell
    them.

    I don't see any problem with these limitations. A bit of planning ahead
    will keep commercial photographers out of trouble, and in my opinion the
    sunset side probably provides better photo opportunities. Besides, in a
    close up its pretty hard to tell one side of the rock from the other.

    There is one further limitation which is a bit of a concern from a
    journalistic view point in that commercial photography can not give a
    "negative impression" (forget the exact wording). This is something
    that needs to be resolved. A journalist should be able to report the
    true situation.
     
    Kload, Aug 7, 2003
    #4
  5. Rob Wild

    Kload Guest

    Any arguments that tourism numbers will drop because commercial photos
    are not available are just plain stupid. I can just imagine someone
    cancelling their holiday because they couldn't **buy** (limitation is
    for commercial photographs only) photos of the entire rock. Just
    ridiculous. Like saying you won't visit Washington because you've only
    ever seen photos of the front of the Whitehouse.....

    Like Miro said "Buy the postcard and say you went."
     
    Kload, Aug 7, 2003
    #5
  6. Rob Wild

    Michael Guest

    Australian Photography Magazine covered this topic in an article a few
    months ago. I believe that the photographer had to purchase a "photographic
    access" pass to be able to cover additional areas of The Rock but there were
    still many angles that could not be photographed.

    Michael
     
    Michael, Aug 8, 2003
    #6
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