Panasonic LZ5 camera

Discussion in 'Panasonic Lumix' started by Jim, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. Jim

    Jim Guest

    I was just about to order on line a new Panasonic LZ5 digital camera when I
    noticed it had no optical view finder.
    My eyes not being too good stops me from seeing anything on the LCD screen
    when outside in sunlight.
    This camera has all the spec that I require and I wondered if any of you
    knew of a camera with similar spec plus an optical finder at a similar
    price.
    The size fits into my jacket nicely. has 6Mps a 6 times optical zoom, image
    stabiliser etc and can be bought for under £200.00 (UK only.)
    Alternatively have any of you got this camera and could tell me if it lives
    up to the adverts.
    Any help appreciated.
    Jim
     
    Jim, Jul 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jim

    Jim Guest


    Tried all methods with my previous cameras. Even bought a thing that fitted
    over the LCD screen to shield it from the sun but it is still too dark to
    set up my pictures and certainly unable to read any of the menus and
    settings. No problem in normal lighting, just sunny conditions. I doubt if I
    am alone with this problem.
    Thanks for your reply though, it is appreciated.
    Jim
     
    Jim, Jul 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jim

    Jim Guest


    Grateful to you Marvin for that info. I may still buy the camera and the
    optical view finder was the only drawback for me.
    I found a vast range of differing prices for the LZ5. Between £153 up to
    £209.
    Will give it some more thought yet.
    Kind regards.
    Jim.
     
    Jim, Jul 24, 2006
    #3
  4. Keith Sheppard wrote:
    []
    On my Panasonic FZ5, I get more than 3 stops gain from the IS, perhaps a
    factor of 10 rather than 4. As I wish to use the full zoom of the 432mm
    lens, rather than the 210mm of the Canon, having IS is a little more
    critical. Different aims and objectives will change the decision outcome.

    Using the IS can also help steady the image in the viewfinder, if you
    wish.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jul 25, 2006
    #4
  5. Jim

    Jim Guest


    Thanks Keith for your interest and you gave me something to think about.
    They are both similar specs as you say and I spent a lot of time comparing
    the two cameras.
    Still havn't come to a decision though.
    The lack of the image stabiliser is a sore point on the Canon as is the lack
    of optical viewfinder on the Panasonic.
    I wonder why the big differences in SD card prices. Like you say , you can
    get a 1Gb at £11 whilst in other stores you can buy it at about £45. I can't
    believe the results can be any different so what price you pay for it.
    I found the Powershot A700 at £183 so I will make a decision soon.
    Thanks again,
    Regards,
    Jim.
     
    Jim, Jul 25, 2006
    #5
  6. Jim wrote:
    []
    You should be pleased about the lack of an optical finder! At best, it is
    imprecise for indicating the field of view, particularly with zoom ranges
    of more than about three or four to one (unless you pay a lot of money).
    There is also the parallax error to consider. Admittedly, the resolution
    of electronic viewfinders (EVF) could be improved a lot, but on the
    cameras which I have, offering both an LCD and EVF, I find myself using
    the EVF more or less all the time.

    Try them and see, if the cameras are otherwise that close.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jul 25, 2006
    #6
  7. Jim

    Jim Guest

    Im not really a serious photographer so I don't have your expertise in the
    technicalities but I'm sure you are right in everything you say.
    My personal problem is that when I try to take pictures out in the open in
    brilliant sunny weather like we are enjoying at the moment, I can not see
    any image on the LCD screen.
    Therefore I am happy to have the addition of an optical viewfinder no matter
    how inaccurate it may be otherwise I wouldn't get any pictures at all.
    This I know is mostly due to my age (heading for 80) and my eyes are not
    perfect.
    I have had several digital cameras in the last six years and have the same
    problem with them all.
    Thank for your help David and I am still deciding what to go for.
    Regards,
    Jim.
     
    Jim, Jul 25, 2006
    #7
  8. Jim wrote:
    []
    Jim,

    Just to clarify, I am not suggesting relying on the LCD screen at the back
    of the camera. Yes, a viewfinder you can put your eye to, and one which
    has proper dioptre adjustment to suit your vision, is most desirable.
    What I have found is that having an electronic viewfinder, rather than an
    optical one, can be preferable in a number of ways, and that for large
    zoom range lenses, the electronic viewfinder (EVF) is probably the only
    sensible way to go. With the EVF, the camera is right to your eye, and
    it's easy to shade against stray light if you need to.

    Having said that - try the cameras in the shop and see for yourself.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jul 26, 2006
    #8
  9. Keith Sheppard wrote:
    []
    The EVF I'm currently using is on a Panasonic FZ5, which is not that big
    and bulky, and weighs around 300g, so you can certainly take it hiking
    etc. But it's certainly not "low end" of the market. Yes, the EVF could
    have better resolution as well!

    As I used to take slides, and as digital has only a finite number of
    pixels, I do sometimes find that I rely on the viewfinder for quite
    precise cropping - perhaps also to be sure that an object is just included
    or just excluded from the picture. I tend to reply on the principle of
    getting it right when taking, rather than having to waste time
    post-processing afterwards. An optical finder would not allow this degree
    of control.

    Whilst an optical finder is better than nothing, something like those
    hand-held slide-viewers you could once get could be adapted to provide an
    "EVF", just based on looking at the LCD finder through a lens. I'm sure
    you can get these. It would also solve the problem of continually having
    to change to reading glasses from distant and vice versa!

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jul 26, 2006
    #9
  10. Jim

    Jim Guest


    I just ordered the £11.00 1Gb card to try it. Like you say theres not much
    to loose if it fails, unless of course you have a couple of hundred pictures
    in the camera.
    I never yet had a problem with an SD card and I always take it out to use it
    in a card reader.
    The A700 is for sale at Cameras2u for £189 with free next day delivery.
    Think that's the one I will buy because of the optical viewfinder.
    I have been overwhelmed by all the help from yourself and David and am in
    your debt.
    This is what newsgroups should be like and not have to read some of the
    abuse and bad language that some posters think is clever.
    Kind regards again.
    Jim
     
    Jim, Jul 26, 2006
    #10
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