Panasonic re-invents the Sony NEX-7

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by RichA, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

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  2. RichA

    Savageduck Guest

    Savageduck, Jul 31, 2013
    #2
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  3. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    I don't see how yet another Panasonic Micro-4/3 is "reinventing" a Sony
    APS-C product. In any case, the specs look closer to the NEX-5 than the
    NEX-8.
     
    J. Clarke, Jul 31, 2013
    #3
  4. RichA

    Savageduck Guest

    Just more RichA speak, and one of the reasons I prefer the look of the
    two Fuji APS-C offerings.
     
    Savageduck, Jul 31, 2013
    #4
  5. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Some weirdness with processing the RAWs in Adobe PS with the Fujis. The resolution of the current top 4/3rds sensor is pretty extreme, and you can actually soften it to get the kind of noise levels present in APS, if you experiment.
     
    RichA, Jul 31, 2013
    #5
  6. RichA

    BobA Guest

    I wonder if Panasonic has made provisions for setting
    hyperfocal distances or autoISO in manual mode with
    this one. I like Panasonic cameras in a lot of ways,
    but I don't expect to buy any more of them until they
    address these and a few other silly oversights.

    BobA
     
    BobA, Jul 31, 2013
    #6
  7. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    I've never had a camera with auto-ISO so I don't miss it. As for
    setting hyperfocal distances, what is your objection to turning the
    focus ring?
     
    J. Clarke, Jul 31, 2013
    #7
  8. RichA

    BobA Guest

    AutoISO in manual mode is really important but many
    people don't realize it.
    I have no objection of turning the focus ring. What
    I have a problem with is having no way to tell if
    the focus is set at the hyperfocal distance.

    BobA
     
    BobA, Jul 31, 2013
    #8
  9. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    In manual mode I don't want auto-anything.
    So pick lenses that have that marking. Geez.
     
    J. Clarke, Jul 31, 2013
    #9
  10. RichA

    Savageduck Guest

    Please explain why Auto-ISO is so important in manual mode. Using it
    seems to imply that manual mode is no longer manual. Manually setting
    aperture, shutter speed, and ISO is what I think of as haveing full
    manual control over the exposure parameters. Throw in Auto-ISO and one
    of the controlling elements is no longer manual.

    With my D300S, my only use of Auto-ISO is for some (not all) motor
    sport, or other sporting scenarios where panning with a moving target,
    can take you in and out of different light conditions. When using
    Auto-ISO I have a shooting menu preset where I set the max & min ISO
    range to contain Auto-ISO
    Current editions of modern interchangeable lenses are not likely to
    have hyperfocal distance markings.
     
    Savageduck, Jul 31, 2013
    #10
  11. RichA

    Bowser Guest

    Nobody would force you to use it. but being able to set a specific
    shutter speed and aperture and always (OK, nearly...) get properly
    exposed photos when light changes would be a very nice option.
     
    Bowser, Jul 31, 2013
    #11
  12. This is the problem, very few modern lenses have them.

    David
     
    David Hare-Scott, Jul 31, 2013
    #12
  13. RichA

    BobA Guest

    That's the way a lot of people look at it.
    It's a hold over from film camera days when
    autoISO was impossible.

    The time when you need autoISO in manual-mode,
    is when you have depth-of-field requirements
    so the aperture needs to be manually set, AND
    you have speed requirements (to prevent blur,
    or to cause blur, or whatever) so the shutter
    speed needs to also be manually set. The only
    degree of freedom left for exposure is ISO.

    If the lighting is very uniform, then set the
    ISO manually and you're set. However, if lighting
    is dynamic, autoISO is the answer. For those
    people that have figured this one out and have
    cameras that support it, it is very often the
    perferred shooting mode.
    We're talking about Panasonic u4/3s lens. There
    *aren't* *any* with markings. These are focus-by-wire
    lens with no mechanical linkage, so it's not even
    possible to make markings. The camera body can
    sense the lens's focus location, and could convert
    that to a distance and report it. Panasonic P&Ss
    do, but their u4/3 cameras don't. Ask Panasonic.
    I have. There's no way to do it short of measuring
    the hyperfocal distance out on the ground and then
    focusing on that point.

    BobA
     
    BobA, Aug 1, 2013
    #13
  14. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    Until a few months ago I didn't realize there was such a thing as auto
    ISO. So far I still haven't used it.

    I can see the use for an upper limit, but why a lower limit?
    Agreed.
     
    PeterN, Aug 1, 2013
    #14
  15. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    As I said before one can, figure it out.
     
    PeterN, Aug 1, 2013
    #15
  16. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    I can see it as a useful third auto option, but it's not something I'm
    going to die without.
    There are three f/0.95 lenses for Micro 4/3, two of which (17.5 & 25mm)
    are branded "Voigtlander" and the third (35mm) branded "Mitakon", all of
    which have such markings. With a suitable adapter, most lenses for the
    Leica M will work--again they're pretty much all marked.
     
    J. Clarke, Aug 1, 2013
    #16
  17. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    If it's something of importance to someone though it's an easy thing to
    check, and Micro 4/3 will take just about any lens ever made for APS-C
    and larger.
     
    J. Clarke, Aug 1, 2013
    #17
  18. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    That's not what I call "manual" though. That's a third "preferred"
    autooption.
    As for
    I found three different ones with five minutes of googling, two of which
    are available from B&H.
    Voigtlander seems to know something that you and Panasonic don't.
     
    J. Clarke, Aug 1, 2013
    #18
  19. Yes you can but that doesn't make it quick, accurate or easy. When a lens
    doesn't have any focal distance marks either one is reduced to estimating
    (looking up graphs, computing etc) the hyperfocal distance under the
    conditions, then finding an object in the environment (if there is one) that
    is (you estimate) that distance away and focussing on it. I am not saying
    that marks on the lens are a perfect solution but they are quick and easy
    and give you a reference point right then and there as you are setting up
    the shot without any other messing about. With a little practice you get to
    know the lens and can, if required, adapt by focussing a little farther out,
    stopping down another stop or whatever produces results that are likely to
    satisfy. I cannot see why the lens makers will not give you a bit of help
    here.

    D
     
    David Hare-Scott, Aug 1, 2013
    #19
  20. Why?

    D
     
    David Hare-Scott, Aug 1, 2013
    #20
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