Pano question

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by tony cooper, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    I keep saying that panos don't interest me much, but if I'm going to
    do something I want to be able to do it right.

    Using Photoshop Photomerge, there's a white vertical line between each
    frame. I'm over-lapping sufficiently, and moving the frame doesn't
    eliminate the line. I can clone out the line, but it seems this
    shouldn't be necessary.

    This is just two frames for example:

    http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f244/cooper213/panotest.jpg
     
    tony cooper, Nov 7, 2010
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    Richard Guest

    Have you tried Windows Live Photo Gallery?
    http://explore.live.com/windows-live-photo-gallery?os=other
    From what I've experienced, the panorama generation is quite good and fairly
    painless.

    Richard
     
    Richard, Nov 7, 2010
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    That is a flattened image. It's a .jpg, so I had to flatten it. I
    cropped out an area from two layers and flattened it.

    The lines appear in all panos I've tried from several source sets of
    photos. They appear when the different frames are photomerged and a
    ..psd is created. They remain when the .psd is flattened.

    I know how to correct the problem with cloning and editing, but that
    adds quite a bit of work.
     
    tony cooper, Nov 7, 2010
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    Richard Guest

    Possibly a stupid question, but you are taking overlapped photos and not
    cropping them?
    FWIW, I have tried doing panoramas with photoshop and other software. So
    far, for simplicity, the Windows Live thing has done a good job for me.
    However, YMMV.

    Richard
     
    Richard, Nov 7, 2010
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    Yes. I take a series of photos, move them to their own folder, and
    run Photomerge. I don't crop or adjust the photos before doing this.
    That step has not been in any of the tutorials I've read.

    Thanks, but I want to stick with PS CS4 and Photomerge. I know this
    program will do a decent job, and feel the problem is something I'm
    doing, or not doing, and want to figure it out.

    The computer I'm doing this on is a Windows-based with Windows XP.
     
    tony cooper, Nov 7, 2010
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    Update: I tried making a pano out of two images. No lines. I then
    used three images. No lines. Same with four images and then five
    images. Then I brought in all 11 images in the series. The lines
    came back, and the lines are between *all* the images.

    Evidently, there is something about the number of images brought in
    that causes the problem. Five is OK, eleven is too many. On another
    series, I got lines with 8 images.


    And, to Bowser, yes I am overlapping at least 25%.
     
    tony cooper, Nov 7, 2010
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    I don't understand that last paragraph, Alan. Can you rephrase?

    I assure you that flattening does not correct the problems I'm having.
    PS merges into a .psd, and to make a .jpg from the .psd requires
    flattening.

    I'll keep working on it.
     
    tony cooper, Nov 8, 2010
    #7
  8. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    That's easily correctable in the .psd. That's not what I'm concerned
    about.
     
    tony cooper, Nov 8, 2010
    #8
  9. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    The funny thing is that when I do the pano I don't get anything like
    that jagged line you do. When photomerge completes the action, what I
    see is a nice, smooth melding of frames with only those damned white
    vertical lines. They are precisely vertical. They are there in the
    ..psd and there when the .psd is flattened.
     
    tony cooper, Nov 8, 2010
    #9

  10. It's been a while since I've done a pano in PS, but the vertical lines
    are something I've not experienced- but there is a feature in PS that
    can put vertical lines in to help line things up or measure. They aren't
    in the print, though, and I forget the route to putting them in or
    taking them out.
     
    John McWilliams, Nov 8, 2010
    #10
  11. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    More on pano...

    This continues to baffle me. I made a pano out of 14 images taken at
    Vizcaya (James Deering's fabulous mansion in Miami) a few weeks ago.
    I didn't work with these because I think the subject matter is
    lacking, but decided to see what happened.

    No noticeable verticals this time, but a few jagged lines like the
    Duck gets.

    http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f244/cooper213/ScreenHunter_01Nov081312.gif

    The jaggies go away I flatten.

    http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f244/cooper213/ScreenHunter_02Nov081313.gif


    I'm doing this exactly the same way as yesterday's example.

    This will not be a keeper, by the way. The gaps in the lower part of
    the dock really make it unusable.
     
    tony cooper, Nov 8, 2010
    #11
  12. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    Thanks to all who have made suggestions or added comments about my
    pano problems.

    Now all I have to do is find a suitable subject for the coming
    mandate.
     
    tony cooper, Nov 9, 2010
    #12
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