photo book on the Australian outback

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by T. Heslenfeld, Aug 1, 2009.

  1. My upcoming photo book 'Hot' on the Australian outback is now available in a
    limited edition. Check out www.hot-the-book.com for a sneak preview and
    more information.

    The book tells the story of a trip I made earlier this year with a 4WD
    bushcamper, doing ten thousand kilometres of dirt roads and tracks, all the
    way from Adelaide to Darwin.

    Anybody interested is welcome.


    T. Heslenfeld
    travel photographer
    The Netherlands
    www.thijsheslenfeld.com
    office at thijsheslenfeld dot com
     
    T. Heslenfeld, Aug 1, 2009
    #1
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  2. Oh Wow... Isn't this exciting... In an air conditioned Land
    Cruiser too? Oh my, I suppose you had to rough it with a gas
    stove too did you?

    I remember surveying the Artesian basin out that way in 1963
    when I worked for Slumberer. It was real bush in those days.
    I've still got about 800 4x5 negatives from that job.

    In 1983, when I worked for another exploration firm - this
    time looking for Gold. I went from Leonora in WA through the
    Victoria desert, putting my faith in the surveyor knowing
    where he was going. I've got about 1600 mostly colour slides
    from that trip.

    I remember too looking at your Antarctica photos and thinking:
    Surely the collection my studio manager's husband took during
    winter there in 1993 would make a more saleable book than one
    produced from happy snaps on a bloody tourist boat?

    Your descriptions all sound like you really roughed it. I'll
    tell you what roughing it is son... When you're broke and
    20,000 head of beef cattle are starving and you can't afford a
    new wing for the DC2 you use to drop feed to them so you drag
    a wing from a crashed DC3 430 miles with a couple of camels
    and patch up the old girl with one wing longer than the other
    so you can feed your stock.

    Or maybe when the Cooper creek flows in all three channels and
    it's 60 miles wide. You take a small boat and try to rescue
    some stock on an island soon to be underwater and end up
    swimming them back because a log sank the boat.

    I don't know who you are mate but I'll tell you something.
    Selling sand to the Arabs is a trick you haven't mastered.
    Your last crapshot at getting publicity when you asked
    aus.photo subscribers what sort of camera you ought to use was
    pretty pathetic but this one is about as bad as it gets.

    There's more quality photos of Australia and it's indigenous
    population in their natural environment in my back room than
    you'll ever get driving up the highway in an air conditioned
    land cruiser. Don't try to pull the wool over people's eyes
    again mate.
     
    The pixel Bandit, Aug 2, 2009
    #2
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  3. T. Heslenfeld

    Robert Coe Guest

    : T. Heslenfeld wrote:
    : > My upcoming photo book 'Hot' on the Australian outback is now available in a
    : > limited edition. Check out www.hot-the-book.com for a sneak preview and
    : > more information.
    : >
    : > The book tells the story of a trip I made earlier this year with a 4WD
    : > bushcamper, doing ten thousand kilometres of dirt roads and tracks, all the
    : > way from Adelaide to Darwin.
    : >
    : > Anybody interested is welcome.
    : >
    : >
    : Oh Wow... Isn't this exciting... In an air conditioned Land
    : Cruiser too? Oh my, I suppose you had to rough it with a gas
    : stove too did you?
    :
    : I remember surveying the Artesian basin out that way in 1963
    : when I worked for Slumberer.

    I know you don't believe me, but that spellchecker is making you look like a
    jackass. ;^)

    : It was real bush in those days.
    : I've still got about 800 4x5 negatives from that job.
    :
    : In 1983, when I worked for another exploration firm - this
    : time looking for Gold. I went from Leonora in WA through the
    : Victoria desert, putting my faith in the surveyor knowing
    : where he was going. I've got about 1600 mostly colour slides
    : from that trip.
    :
    : I remember too looking at your Antarctica photos and thinking:
    : Surely the collection my studio manager's husband took during
    : winter there in 1993 would make a more saleable book than one
    : produced from happy snaps on a bloody tourist boat?
    :
    : Your descriptions all sound like you really roughed it. I'll
    : tell you what roughing it is son... When you're broke and
    : 20,000 head of beef cattle are starving and you can't afford a
    : new wing for the DC2 you use to drop feed to them so you drag
    : a wing from a crashed DC3 430 miles with a couple of camels
    : and patch up the old girl with one wing longer than the other
    : so you can feed your stock.
    :
    : Or maybe when the Cooper creek flows in all three channels and
    : it's 60 miles wide. You take a small boat and try to rescue
    : some stock on an island soon to be underwater and end up
    : swimming them back because a log sank the boat.
    :
    : I don't know who you are mate but I'll tell you something.
    : Selling sand to the Arabs is a trick you haven't mastered.
    : Your last crapshot at getting publicity when you asked
    : aus.photo subscribers what sort of camera you ought to use was
    : pretty pathetic but this one is about as bad as it gets.
    :
    : There's more quality photos of Australia and it's indigenous
    : population in their natural environment in my back room than
    : you'll ever get driving up the highway in an air conditioned
    : land cruiser. Don't try to pull the wool over people's eyes
    : again mate.

    Doug, I'll grant that you've probably been all over Australia and know the
    country pretty well. But if you think we believe all the foregoing bullhockey,
    you're just as crazy as that Dutch author.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 2, 2009
    #3
  4. T. Heslenfeld

    Pete D Guest

    Its Coopers Creek actually, was there last week to check.
     
    Pete D, Aug 2, 2009
    #4
  5. Robert Coe wrote:
    ..
    Well there you go Bob. I suppose because you never saw Davey
    Crockett shoot anyone you don't believe what he did either?

    This country is newly discovered compared to the USA. Not a
    lie in what I said earlier. Many of our pioneers are still
    alive and we never carried side arms. Dogs were enough for us.

    The guy who swam his cattle back was married to a tribal
    aboriginal woman, had 8 kids and had never seen a city with
    more than 1000 people in it when I met him. It was on his
    "To-Do" list before he died.

    To repay the Charleville dentist for flying out to fix his
    abscessed tooth, he asked him over the peddle radio what he
    could do.
    http://www.questacon.edu.au/indepth/clever/royal_flying_doctor_service.html

    The Dentist said the kids in the Kindergaden needed a pet,
    were there any young camels about?

    What follows is documented fact mate... The stockman went out
    in an old ex-war surplus Austin Gypsie and ran down a young
    camel. He tied it's legs to stop it thrashing around and got
    back on the peddle radio when he returned to the homestead to
    see if the mail plane (A Douglas DC3 - sister plane of the one
    that crashed out near the French line in Poeppels corner)
    could drop in and pick up a package for the Charleville dentist.

    Were it not for one of the crew from Down Under Well Services
    (who had a contract to log artesian bores in the region
    looking for oil), photographing the dents in the side of the
    plane where the camel kicked the hell out of it - and asking
    me to develop the film in my mobile darkroom, it may have been
    just a folklore story. For many years that camel was a pet to
    the kids in Charleville.

    Charleville had the only ISDN phone service for hundreds of
    miles. The freelance TV cameramen used to plug into it to
    upload their news footage... Those who had those cumbersome,
    new fangled Video cameras with monstrous "Umatic" portable
    tape recorders that struggled to record 20 minutes of time
    base corrected video before the batteries died.

    I spent 6 days sitting on top of an all wheel drive
    international with air suspension that had the company
    darkroom in it, bogged past the axles drinking beer with the
    driver of a road train carrying grog as we waited half way
    between Wyandra and Charleville for a council Grader to come
    and pull us out.

    You haven't got a clue, Bob, what we did to survive as this
    vast land as it was (very) slowly populated. You'll probably
    never spend your later years with foot long steel rods and
    titanium bolts holding you back together ... A legacy of hard
    work we (those my age) did in making this country
    transverseable in air conditioned comfort for the likes of
    Heslenfeld and other tourists who think they've got something
    unique with their happy snaps of pet kangaroos and zoo
    animals. http://www.d-mac.info/examples/spine.htm

    If you really have any interest in Australia's history, you
    can buy my (pictorial) book on the subject. It'll be on sale
    world wide late next year... Nothing happy snap tourism in it.
     
    The pixel Bandit, Aug 2, 2009
    #5
  6. T. Heslenfeld

    Peter Chant Guest

    ....and tell that to the youth of today and they won't beleive you



     
    Peter Chant, Aug 2, 2009
    #6
  7. T. Heslenfeld

    Robert Coe Guest

    : Robert Coe wrote:
    : .
    : >
    : > Doug, I'll grant that you've probably been all over Australia and know the
    : > country pretty well. But if you think we believe all the foregoing bullhockey,
    : > you're just as crazy as that Dutch author.
    : >
    : > Bob
    :
    : Well there you go Bob. I suppose because you never saw Davey
    : Crockett shoot anyone you don't believe what he did either?
    :
    : This country is newly discovered compared to the USA. Not a
    : lie in what I said earlier. Many of our pioneers are still
    : alive and we never carried side arms. Dogs were enough for us.
    :
    : The guy who swam his cattle back was married to a tribal
    : aboriginal woman, had 8 kids and had never seen a city with
    : more than 1000 people in it when I met him. It was on his
    : "To-Do" list before he died.
    :
    : To repay the Charleville dentist for flying out to fix his
    : abscessed tooth, he asked him over the peddle radio what he
    : could do.
    : http://www.questacon.edu.au/indepth/clever/royal_flying_doctor_service.html
    :
    : The Dentist said the kids in the Kindergaden needed a pet,
    : were there any young camels about?
    :
    : What follows is documented fact mate... The stockman went out
    : in an old ex-war surplus Austin Gypsie and ran down a young
    : camel. He tied it's legs to stop it thrashing around and got
    : back on the peddle radio when he returned to the homestead to
    : see if the mail plane (A Douglas DC3 - sister plane of the one
    : that crashed out near the French line in Poeppels corner)
    : could drop in and pick up a package for the Charleville dentist.
    :
    : Were it not for one of the crew from Down Under Well Services
    : (who had a contract to log artesian bores in the region
    : looking for oil), photographing the dents in the side of the
    : plane where the camel kicked the hell out of it - and asking
    : me to develop the film in my mobile darkroom, it may have been
    : just a folklore story. For many years that camel was a pet to
    : the kids in Charleville.
    :
    : Charleville had the only ISDN phone service for hundreds of
    : miles. The freelance TV cameramen used to plug into it to
    : upload their news footage... Those who had those cumbersome,
    : new fangled Video cameras with monstrous "Umatic" portable
    : tape recorders that struggled to record 20 minutes of time
    : base corrected video before the batteries died.
    :
    : I spent 6 days sitting on top of an all wheel drive
    : international with air suspension that had the company
    : darkroom in it, bogged past the axles drinking beer with the
    : driver of a road train carrying grog as we waited half way
    : between Wyandra and Charleville for a council Grader to come
    : and pull us out.
    :
    : You haven't got a clue, Bob, what we did to survive as this
    : vast land as it was (very) slowly populated. You'll probably
    : never spend your later years with foot long steel rods and
    : titanium bolts holding you back together ... A legacy of hard
    : work we (those my age) did in making this country
    : transverseable in air conditioned comfort for the likes of
    : Heslenfeld and other tourists who think they've got something
    : unique with their happy snaps of pet kangaroos and zoo
    : animals. http://www.d-mac.info/examples/spine.htm
    :
    : If you really have any interest in Australia's history, you
    : can buy my (pictorial) book on the subject. It'll be on sale
    : world wide late next year... Nothing happy snap tourism in it.

    OK, OK. I misread it. I thought YOU were claiming to have done all those
    things yourself. Being stuck in the mud for six days? That I do believe!
    You're lucky the trucks were carrying beer!

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 2, 2009
    #7
  8. T. Heslenfeld

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 2009-08-01 18:27:33 -0700, The pixel Bandit <> said:
    :
    : > T. Heslenfeld wrote:
    : >> My upcoming photo book 'Hot' on the Australian outback is now available in a
    : >> limited edition. Check out www.hot-the-book.com for a sneak preview and
    : >> more information.
    : >>
    : >> The book tells the story of a trip I made earlier this year with a 4WD
    : >> bushcamper, doing ten thousand kilometres of dirt roads and tracks, all the
    : >> way from Adelaide to Darwin.
    : >>
    : >> Anybody interested is welcome.
    : >>
    : >>
    : > Oh Wow... Isn't this exciting... In an air conditioned Land Cruiser
    : > too? Oh my, I suppose you had to rough it with a gas stove too did you?
    : >
    : > I remember surveying the Artesian basin out that way in 1963 when I
    : > worked for Slumberer. It was real bush in those days. I've still got
    : > about 800 4x5 negatives from that job.
    :
    : Doug, Just how old were you in 1963?
    : I was 14 back then, I am 60 now, so I guess you must be somewhere
    : around 70 now.
    : I must be more respectful.

    I don't have to. I'm as old as he is. ;^)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 2, 2009
    #8
  9. Correction. You meant to say "more recently invaded". You can't really
    "discover" a country where people are already living. That's like walking
    up to someone's Porsche, kicking them out of the driver's seat and killing
    them, then claiming you "discovered" that Porsche. It's also as erroneous
    as saying that that idiot Columbus "discovered" North America. For cripes
    sake, he and all of his kind were even so stupid that they all thought they
    were in India for who knows how many years. That's like the whole country
    of Spain being nothing but paraplegic retards flopping around and claiming
    they "discovered" the floor. This doesn't even begin to count how much
    destruction they caused when Spaniards reached the shores of Central and
    South America too. I'd have absolutely nothing to be proud of if I was of
    Spanish descent. I'd probably even lie on every questionnaire so as not to
    reveal my true and embarrassing Spanish origins. Have any Spanish people
    ever apologized for how much they have destroyed across the globe and how
    many cultures and people they have murdered over the centuries? Probably
    not. Then we call these kinds of idiots like Columbus our "heroes" in
    history. This all says so much about humanity. All revealed in a simple and
    often wrongly used word, "discovered".
     
    Galen Harrows, Aug 2, 2009
    #9
  10. T. Heslenfeld

    Bruce Guest


    Things could be worse - imagine of you were Australian!

    Or Canadian, eh? ;-)

    ..
     
    Bruce, Aug 2, 2009
    #10
  11. T. Heslenfeld

    Me Guest

    Well if you're going to be "embarrassed" about the actions of your
    ancestors from the perspective of 21st century western morality, then
    you're on a hiding to nowhere, as it's going to depend on how far back
    you go - there will be skeletons in every closet.
    Some of my ancestors were almost certainly cannibals - and not even like
    German ones who have the manners to gain consent from their meal.
    More useful might be considering what happens in the world now - despite
    full knowledge of the consequences and morality.
     
    Me, Aug 2, 2009
    #11
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