Photo Resolution?

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by jw, Dec 15, 2010.

  1. jw

    jw Guest

    What is the min/max recommended resolution for photos that will be
    used on a Web site?

    Thanks

    Duke
     
    jw, Dec 15, 2010
    #1
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  2. jw

    Kele Guest

    Duke,

    Google "common screen resolution"; and narrow your search to Past Year;
    there is much info from web developers about what size monitors (screen rez)
    are being used to display their pages. Looks like the most common is still
    1024 (pixels wide) and 1280 is becoming common. Note that the screen rez
    numbers are the entire screen; embedded web page photos must be smaller to
    account for browser boarders, bars, etc. If I had to answer, I think
    600x800 photos is currently the best (safe) size for a web page - fits on
    nearly everyone's monitor and still big enough for "snaps" details to be
    seen.

    Recent (IE) browsers have an auto size image to fit browser window
    function - "enable automatic image resizing" can be turned on/off in IE
    Options > Advanced Tab >Multimedia. I don't like it on, but the default is
    On. Basically, this solves the problem of having to guess the largest size
    that can be displayed on the viewer's Internet browser without having to
    scroll.

    As another responder mentioned, the thumbnail link to the full size image is
    one of the better methods to display photos on a web page [main page loads
    faster with thumbnails of a picture(s) instead of the full size photo(s)].
    Or just a word link My Back Yard. This way you can control the layout of
    your web page(s) more predictably having thumbnails (or text) a stable size.
    Thumbnails don't require a mastery of HTML, just make a very small copy
    (80x100 pixels for example) of your original image; don't worry about
    maintaining the "aspect ratio" of the thumbnail. Place the thumbnail on
    your web page and the original (full size) image in your web and/or on the
    Internet/Intranet. Select the thumbnail and create a shortcut to the full
    size image. Google "create an image link" if needed.

    - Kele


    ------
    What is the min/max recommended resolution for photos that will be
    used on a Web site?

    Thanks

    Duke
     
    Kele, Dec 19, 2010
    #2
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  3. jw

    Joel Guest

    For WEB you may set to whatever acceptable to you and your viewer, and of
    course for whatever you after. Example

    - Regular web user, I would would keep the file size small for speed, and
    quality would be acceptable (to you and your users)

    - For your clients or requiring the max quality then go for whatever max
    your host allowing. Example for my clients, around 2-3M would be more than
    what most of them need. And since my account only allow my to upload up to
    10M max, so if it's larger than 10M (like 20-80M for example) then I have to
    go different route.

    I haven't done web page for ages, but years ago with older Photoshop and
    most people were still using 5.6KB/s modem I usually set to around 75-PPI
    and Quality would be around 80-90% (older Photosop used 0-100% and newer use
    1-12 Quality).
     
    Joel, Dec 19, 2010
    #3
  4. jw

    Joel Guest

    It doesn't matter what browser uses or not use, every single image
    requires 3 values

    H x W + R (R = some program calls Resolution but we understand as PPI).
    Besides that QUALITY is the viewing value.

    Similar to VIDEO, it has more than W x H, but also BriRate, FrameRate (and
    some waco codec for different thing).
     
    Joel, Dec 19, 2010
    #4
  5. jw

    jw Guest

    Thanks especially for this tip.

    Duke
     
    jw, Dec 21, 2010
    #5
  6. jw

    Joel Guest

    H x W usually have not much to do with web, as most of them should be in
    table (thumbnail or smaller displaying). In general, most photo should be
    left alone as original or 3:2 RATIO (or whatever came out of camera)

    There is not much sence to change the H x W to fit either CRT or
    Widescreen monitor/TV, as photo should be more than filling any special
    screen RATIO.

    As I have mention earlier, every single PHOTO/IMAGE has or requires at
    least 3 values.

    H x W x R = no image existing with one of those 3 values missing

    Besides those 3 values, you can add other value which is the QUALITY
     
    Joel, Dec 21, 2010
    #6
  7. jw

    Joel Guest

    True! we can say PPI, DPI, LPI (or whatever) could means something and
    mean NOTHING. Or all 3 values have to depend on each other to form a TRUE
    VALUE. Example

    "1 x 1 x 300-PPI" is smaller value than "600 x 600 x 1-PPI"

    Try it, just change the PPI to 1-PPI and lets the program (or you change
    the value of H & W) then you will see 1-PPI could have the exact same value
    as whatever PPI may be.

    I haven't done any print test with 1-PPI, but I do believe that the
    printing value would depend on the total pixel. I could be wrong, but I
    don't think the printer will read the EXIF then tell the printer to print as
    1-PPI. I sure can test print with my inkjet printer, but it may not work
    with different printers (?).

    Also, I did few poster size 36" x 24" prints (online printing companies)
    with PPI set to 150-PPI and they all turned out great. Yes, the companies
    mention 300-PPI and even mentions TIFF, but I uploaded JPG and 1/2 the PPI
    value they recomment. (I guess they do know how thing works, but don't have
    the time and word to answer all questions so they just say 300-PPI).

    P.S. I don't mean to correct you or anyone, just taking a chance to post
    some extra information.
     
    Joel, Dec 22, 2010
    #7
  8. jw

    Kele Guest

    Just to clarify... I don't mean to change the aspect ratio of the original
    image published to the web. The original image, even if resized, should
    (normally) maintain its original aspect ratio (height x width), "Constrained
    (maintain) Proportions" in Photoshop. But the thumbnail that links to the
    original image can be tailored to any size and proportions. If I want the
    thumbnails to be 80x80 pixel squares, I can disregard constraining the
    proportions and make the original rectangle shaped image square, or I can
    crop the original image to a square and Save-As for my thumbnail. It just
    depends how I want the thumbnails to appear on the web page, ie: thumbnails
    will all be 80x80 squares.

    The thumbnail is nothing more than an image that links to another web
    element; a thumbnail doesn't have to relate in any way to its linked image
    (element). In other words, I can make thumbnails.jpg of dots (for example)
    that link to anything:

    Red Dot opens
    http://www.softpedia.com/screenshots/The-Winter-Scenes-Screensaver_1.png (My
    Back Yard)

    Blue Dot opens http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/fw4.pdf

    etc...






    ------

    Duke,

    As another responder mentioned, the thumbnail link to the full size image is
    one of the better methods to display photos on a web page [main page loads
    faster with thumbnails of a picture(s) instead of the full size photo(s)].
    Or just a word link My Back Yard. This way you can control the layout of
    your web page(s) more predictably having thumbnails (or text) a stable size.
    Thumbnails don't require a mastery of HTML, just make a very small copy
    (80x100 pixels for example) of your original image; don't worry about
    maintaining the "aspect ratio" of the thumbnail. Place the thumbnail on
    your web page and the original (full size) image in your web and/or on the
    Internet/Intranet. Select the thumbnail and create a shortcut to the full
    size image. Google "create an image link" if needed.

    - Kele


    ------
    What is the min/max recommended resolution for photos that will be
    used on a Web site?

    Thanks

    Duke
     
    Kele, Dec 22, 2010
    #8
  9. jw

    Joel Guest

    I don't print directly from Photoshop. Years ago, when printlab was so
    expensive I used to print my own with inkjet, but now printlab is cheaper
    than inkjet I have been printing my photos using much more expensive printer
    (whatever the printlad uses).

    In general, I don't know much about Photoshop and its printing option, but
    I do believe that most if not all softwares should print whatever TOTAL
    PIXEL to whatever maximum it can print. IOW, the larger the print size the
    fewer PPI (lower quality, fewer PPI), and the print won't be much or any
    better if .... it's hard to explain cuz

    - I don't care much what my current inkjet printer can do, but years ago I
    read some newer generation of inkjet printer can do 1200-2400 DPI (or even
    more using the macro technology)

    - I can't tell what my newer inkjet printer with 6-ink-cartridge does, but I
    can the print is much better than the older 4 and 5-ink-cartridge printer.

    And I haven't cared to check the better quality option yet.

    About the difference between PPI, DPI, LPI, I do understand what they
    stand for, but I don't see how they relate to each other. IOW, my
    understanging that when viewing we use PPI (Pixel = for monitor), when
    printing we use DPI (HOT = for printer or ink), and when we PRESS we use
    LINE (LINE = for press which I haven't heard anyone mentions it for ages).
    So to me, even the 3 differrent words have no related to others, but all 3
    share the same value.

    IOW, if you have more PIXEL (PPI) then the printer can print more DPI and
    the press can press more LPI.

    P.S. Photoshop with UNCHECK option then I don't have any experience, and
    thanks for sharing.
     
    Joel, Dec 23, 2010
    #9
  10. jw

    Joel Guest

    Well, it depends on your style. Thumbnail can be a LINK, smaller
    displaying, or it can be actually smaller file with link to the original
    larger image.

    IOW, thumnail with smaller filesize wwith link to larger size for quick
    diplaying (loading), and smaller thumbnail (with original size) to fit more
    images to the page.
     
    Joel, Dec 23, 2010
    #10
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