Photo storage

Discussion in 'UK Photography' started by D.M. Procida, Feb 25, 2010.

  1. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    I have a large number of family photographs - a large carton full of
    prints, slides and negatives - that I need to go through, sort out, and
    organise into some form of appropriate permanent storage.

    Some just need to be safely archived, others will go into albums.

    What can I buy that will be good for archiving them well, that will keep
    them flat?

    Some of the colour prints from the 1970s are quite faded. Is this just
    old age, or perhaps poor storage?

    Daniele
     
    D.M. Procida, Feb 25, 2010
    #1
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  2. D.M. Procida

    newshound Guest

    Definitely.

    But hopefully, affordable network storage devices with RAID, suitable for
    ordinary mortals, will be along fairly soon. Anyone got any recommendations?
     
    newshound, Feb 26, 2010
    #2
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  3. D.M. Procida

    Ben Guest

    A Windows Home Server? It doesn't use RAID, as that's a bit restricting.
    Instead, it still duplicates files across 2 drives, but allows you to
    have a random collection of all sorts of drives attached to the server.
    What's more, it'll do your PC backups for you as well.

    They're not expensive - you can even build your own from an old PC and
    some disk drives.

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/windowshomeserver/default.mspx
    http://blogs.technet.com/homeserver/


    Another alternative is the various on-line storage solutions available -
    if you trust them never to lose your data.
     
    Ben, Feb 26, 2010
    #3
  4. D.M. Procida

    Ben Guest

    A Windows Home Server? It doesn't use RAID, as that's a bit restricting.
    Instead, it still duplicates files across 2 drives, but allows you to
    have a random collection of all sorts of drives attached to the server.
    What's more, it'll do your PC backups for you as well.

    They're not expensive - you can even build your own from an old PC and
    some disk drives.

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/windowshomeserver/default.mspx
    http://blogs.technet.com/homeserver/


    Another alternative is the various on-line storage solutions available -
    if you trust them never to lose your data.
     
    Ben, Feb 26, 2010
    #4
  5. D.M. Procida

    Chris H Guest

    Netgear ReadyNAS Pro Pioneer. I have one with 6*1TB drives gives me
    4.5Tb of RAID6 (should be able to recover any two drives failing.)
    Total cost less that 1400 GBP. Bought it about 5 months ago.

    I got that for my business and there are cheaper options. The 6 drive
    chassis (empty) is about 750 GBP and you add the drives you want from a
    list of recommended drives. You can run with any number from 1-6 and it
    will expand with you.

    I think can hold a maximum of 16Tb.... 10 years ago I doubt there was
    anyone anywhere (including governments) who had 16TB in one place. Let
    alone under a desk.

    I went for the 1tb drives at about 55GBP each.

    The other thing you MUST have is a decent UPS with auto shutdown NetGear
    recommend a set that work with the ready NAS an APC unit will cost about
    60GBP so for 1500 GBP you get 4.5TB or RAID6 with power
    conditioning/backup.

    BTW it will alos turn itself on and off at set times and to a whole host
    of admin and sharing options. So you can let the kids have access to one
    area but not others where you keep your experimental pictures of the
    spouse...

    As I said there are cheaper options fron Netgear starting at systems
    with 2 or 4 drives.

    Lacie do similar but you have to buy the drives from them in caddies
    (expensive)

    Buffalo do similar.

    As for storage and back up

    I run a PPC G5 Mac with a 1Tb second hard drive for my picture library.
    As I use Lightroom it always prompts for a back up when importing files
    the back up goes to an external 1Tb Lacie fire wire drive. Every week
    the library is back up to the Ready NAS box. (We back up other things to
    the NAS as well. )


    So at any one time there are 2 or 3 copies of any picture. Now I know
    people say hard drives don't last for ever.... none of mine are over 10
    years old. The data on them is up to 20 years old. As we upgrade PC's
    and storage the data is moved.

    The only problem is if there is nothing to read the file format. So
    archive the tools for reading it. If you use a Nikon or Canon you are
    fire proof. As they have something like 80% of the market there will
    always be a decoder for their file formats.
     
    Chris H, Feb 26, 2010
    #5
  6. D.M. Procida

    Rob Morley Guest

    Why bother when you can do it with Linux?
     
    Rob Morley, Feb 26, 2010
    #6
  7. D.M. Procida

    Chris H Guest

    Which one? Over half the 450 different distributions are obsolete and
    unsupported... :-(

    Then there are the security holes.....
     
    Chris H, Feb 26, 2010
    #7
  8. D.M. Procida

    Rob Morley Guest

    So pick one that isn't going to go away soon - Redhat, SuSE or one of
    the popular Debian-based ones.
    Like Windows doesn't have them? It's not really going to matter if
    it's only talking to machines on your LAN and running restricted
    software anyway, because a load of stuff can be stopped at the firewall
    and a load more is only picked up from mail and browsers, which
    needn't be running on the server.
     
    Rob Morley, Feb 27, 2010
    #8
  9. D.M. Procida

    Chris H Guest

    You know I heard people say that 10 years ago over the Linux flavour of
    the month and half of them are now gone.....

    It does but the are single source and no one other than MS can put them
    in.

    With Linux holes can be put in asynchronously at any point at any time
    in any of the 200+ different distributions. The same is true of the
    compilers.

    Also as the source is available anyone can get hold of your version put
    a hack in, rebuild it etc...
     
    Chris H, Feb 27, 2010
    #9
  10. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    I have never understood the attraction of that, for photographs.

    Obviously, for stuff that needs to be archived in order to keep a
    record, digitising makes a lot of sense, but I would find much less
    pleasure in digitised photographs.
    Thanks. I bought a couple of these:

    <http://www.arcare.com/Store/Products/Photographic-Storage/Photograph-St
    orage/Photo-Storage-Boxes>

    and they will keep the pictures safer while we organise them, and put
    some into albums.

    Daniele
     
    D.M. Procida, Feb 27, 2010
    #10
  11. D.M. Procida

    Justin C Guest

    How do you trust your NetGear NAS? You do know what OS NetGear use to
    drive their NAS devices don't you? Yup, it's Linux, how will you sleep
    tonight?

    Stop believing the FUD being spread by MS. Do a little research and see
    how many governments and multi-nationals are ditching MS in favour of
    this unsafe, insecure OS which you fear, it really isn't so bad.

    Justin.
     
    Justin C, Mar 2, 2010
    #11
  12. D.M. Procida

    spike1 Guest

    And yet all the main distributions that existed back then are still around.
    It's open source, it can be forked and fly-by-nights can be setup and vanish
    all the time. Big deal. Don't like it, just stick with the big boys.

    The ones still around from 10 years ago btw... Include:
    Red Hat, Mandriva (changed their name from Mandrake after the publishers of
    mandrake the magician sued), Debian, Slackware, SuSE, Turbolinux (for the
    oriental types mainly, I believe).

    Alas, Caldera had a nervous breakdown, bought out a unix company and turned
    into the most reviled technology company in the history of the world... Only
    took them a year to do it too. Unbelievably, they're still clinging on to
    life.

    Some of the new kids on the block who're gonna be sticking around for a long
    time include Ubuntu and Fedora.
    That's not how it WORKS.
    You think security holes are "put in"? Intentionally?
    They're included DURING the writing process as unintentioned errors,
    mistakes, bugs.

    The important thing is how quickly they can be removed, and microsoft does
    not have a good record on that. Some security bugs have been around for well
    over ten years in windows, carrying over to each new version since NT3.5 and
    only fixed recently, if at all.
    You're reversing the argument in a VERY stupid way.
    Bugs are located and fixed. They aren't deliberately sneaked in.
    So while you say "microsoft is a single source and can only add so many
    security holes, while linux can get thousands sneaked in", that ACTUAL
    argument is "Microsoft has far fewer developers to locate the bugs, while
    linux has many many eyes all over the world who can spot them, report them
    and fix them"

    The actual fact is, bugs reported in linux get fixed far faster on average
    then those reported in windows.
    and then try to get people to use it...
    The whole point of open source is the ability to make changes that suit you.

    Just because you changed your version of the source to include a back door
    that would allow you to gain access to other people's systems doesn't mean
    your version would automatically get taken up by the community. It would be
    examined, diffed, the hole would be found and MAYBE if you added anything
    that did make an improvement, that would be upstreamed. The hole wouldn't.

    Otherwise your patch would be rejected and you'd be blocked as an idiot.
     
    spike1, Mar 2, 2010
    #12
  13. D.M. Procida

    newshound Guest

    When I joined the CEGB, their mainframes at Park Street were supposed to
    have the biggest RAM in the UK outside the military and security services;
    something like 938k, as I recall. (Admittedly it would have been 16 bit).
    Yes, I bid for one of these a while ago on eBay but lost. They are still a
    bit pricey for the ordinary punter. I manage my domestic backups "by hand"
    with a combination of USB drives and memory sticks, but I can't help
    thinking there is a market opportunity there for someone who can put
    together a friendly package. A pair terabyte drives and a box for £200?
    Changing the subject slightly, I read an article recently that claimed
    modern hard drives didn't really need a UPS but would survive power trips
    without corrupting data.
     
    newshound, Mar 5, 2010
    #13
  14. D.M. Procida

    Chris H Guest

    Why bid? Why not buy one?
    Really? How much was your camera and lens?
    That has been done... Netgear, Buffalo Lacie etc etc etc
    Possible.... You want to take the chance? As it is my UPS not only holds
    power over blips when the power dies but also spikes, over voltage and
    lighting strikes on the line etc. Also the problem is the lost of a
    small amount of data can fill a complete file.
     
    Chris H, Mar 5, 2010
    #14
  15. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    D.M. Procida, Mar 16, 2010
    #15
  16. D.M. Procida

    Chris H Guest

    In message <1jfgh3o.qpmqu2729ogN%[email protected]
    juice.co.uk>, D.M. Procida <[email protected]
    juice.co.uk> writes
    Should have gone to vision on imaging at the NEC last week... lots of
    stuff like that. However as I was not interested I can't remember who
    but there were several archive/storage systems on show
     
    Chris H, Mar 17, 2010
    #16
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