Photographing the full moon - advice needed asap

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Remus, Apr 14, 2006.

  1. Remus

    Remus Guest

    I'm trying to get some good shots of the full moon. So far I've either got just a glowing white disc or a blurry picture (because I was holding the camera and I'd had the best part of a bottle of wine :). I'll be trying again tonight. I have a Canon 350D with a 100-300mm Sigma lens. This time the camera will be on a tripod and I'll be using a remote shutter button to minimise shake. Any advice re shutter speed, ISO setting, aperture setting etc would be greatly appreciated.
     
    Remus, Apr 14, 2006
    #1
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  2. Remus

    philo Guest


    use a tripod for sure.

    then "bracket" your shot by taking exposures at various shutter speeds
     
    philo, Apr 14, 2006
    #2
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  3. Remus

    Joe Friday Guest

    The moon is a very bright light source. You don't need to worry about a
    tripod. Use fast shutter speeds and you'll have great shots in no time.
    Center-weighted metering is helpful too. Lose the wine, and you should be
    able to hand hold your camera and get great shots. Good luck.
     
    Joe Friday, Apr 14, 2006
    #3
  4. Remus

    Vince Guest

    "Remus"wrote
    Can you get any closer to the subject?
     
    Vince, Apr 14, 2006
    #4
  5. Remus

    dj_nme Guest

    Essentialy the moon is lit by the full sun, and so you can use the
    "sunny 16" rule and get a nice clear, well exposed image of the moon itself.
    Basicaly, f/16 at 1/ISO should give you a pretty good image.
    I've taken some hand-held pics of the moon with a Tair-33 300mm f/4 lens
    with ISO 400, f/16 and 1/400 sec that look pretty good.
    It is better to slightly under-expose than to lose fine detail in blown
    highlights by going with f/11 @ 1/400.

    The problem that I think you're having is to get a nicely exposed sky
    (with dramatic clouds, perhaps) and the moon properly exposed as well.
    Unfortunately, you will have to take two pictures and combine them later
    in post processing with your editing software.
     
    dj_nme, Apr 14, 2006
    #5
  6. Remus

    cat Guest

    Can you get any closer to the subject?

    PMSL!

    That's a fab reply!

    Unfortunately, I have little else to add, except I second the lose the
    wine vote!
     
    cat, Apr 14, 2006
    #6
  7. I'm trying to get some good shots of the full moon. So far I've either got
    just a glowing white disc or a blurry picture (because I was holding the
    camera and I'd had the best part of a bottle of wine :). I'll be trying
    again tonight. I have a Canon 350D with a 100-300mm Sigma lens. This time
    the camera will be on a tripod and I'll be using a remote shutter button to
    minimise shake. Any advice re shutter speed, ISO setting, aperture setting
    etc would be greatly appreciated.

    Hi.
    I tried this a few days ago, just for fun.
    I tried it ages ago with a film SLR and the results were okay when I used
    spot metering and a 500mm mirror lens.

    This time I used an EOS350d with a Sigma 600mm mirror lens. This has a fixed
    f8 aperture.
    I got acceptable results (look okay on the screen but haven't printed them
    yet) using:

    400ASA
    1/500 sec
    f8 (of course).

    This exposure was determined by experimenting. 1/320 at f5.6 was also okay
    when viewed on the screen.

    Tell you one thing - experimenting with this type of photography is much
    more fun with digital than with film.


    Regards, Ian.
     
    Fred Anonymous, Apr 15, 2006
    #7
  8. Remus

    philo Guest

    I thought that was so good...I posted on another group...
    of course, they suggested the obvious...
    when photographing the moon...use a good flash <G>

    or else, one of these

    http://sjcook.com/army/searchlight/scan002.jpg
     
    philo, Apr 15, 2006
    #8
  9. Remus

    Remus Guest

    Thanks for all your advice folks. Unfortunately the moon was clouded over so I'll have to wait until next month. As for getting closer to the subject - I tried that but unfortunately, due to a surfeit of wine no doubt, I kept falling off the ladder.
     
    Remus, Apr 15, 2006
    #9
  10. Remus

    philo Guest


    <G>

    if the moon was clouded over...
    your ladder may not have been tall enough
     
    philo, Apr 15, 2006
    #10
  11. Remus

    Paul Furman Guest

    More wine should get you higher/closer (right?).

    Bracketing the aperture might help to find the sweet spot. I hear folks
    talk about careful focusing for star type work which seems preposterous
    to me, it ought to all be pretty close to infinity but I guess not. So
    maybe bracket the focussing as well.
     
    Paul Furman, Apr 16, 2006
    #11
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