Photography inside a Museum

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Chris Ranes, Jan 4, 2004.

  1. Chris Ranes

    Chris Ranes Guest

    What is the best way of getting a perfectly exposed picture, inside a
    Museum, while photographing an object inside a glass case?

    Thanks,

    Chris Ranes
     
    Chris Ranes, Jan 4, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. I'll take a guess, a polarizing lens.

    Am I right ?

    Dave



    | What is the best way of getting a perfectly exposed picture, inside a
    | Museum, while photographing an object inside a glass case?
    |
    | Thanks,
    |
    | Chris Ranes
    |
    |
    |
     
    David H. Lipman, Jan 4, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Chris Ranes

    nt Guest

    1: use a tripod
    2: shoot off axis
    3: use a pola (may or may not work test it)
    4: go at the quietest time
    5: ask everyone else to get out
    6: ask the museum if you can take the item to more apropriate spot (like a
    studio)
    7: buy the item
    8: buy the museum
    9: remove tongue from cheek
     
    nt, Jan 4, 2004
    #3
  4. such a big question, in so few words...... The three biggest issues will be:
    1) color temperature of the light in the museum--- do a custom while balance
    from a card with a digital camera, or try an appropriate filter with a film
    camera (good luck on this one)
    2) shake --- use a tripod !
    3) relfections from the glass case -- big one! Use a Polarizing filter and
    experiment with camera position relative to lighting and polarizer settings
    to "tune out" the glare from the glass case.
     
    Doug mcCormac, Jan 4, 2004
    #4
  5. Chris Ranes

    Peter Guest

    1. Use a tripod
    2. Use a hammer
     
    Peter, Jan 9, 2004
    #5
  6. Chris Ranes

    Drifter Guest

    #3 Have a good lawyer (grin)

    Drifter
     
    Drifter, Jan 9, 2004
    #6
  7. Now that's funny, Peter, I don't care who yar.
    Did you get a serious answer yet, Chris? A helpful one??
    Try a polarizing filter. And watch your lighting. You've got to watch for
    reflections in the glass, and reflections off the object. The paint can be
    glossy (as with an oil painting) which will shine in your final photo. Buy a
    shadowbox and practice at home.

    Photographing art is an art in itself.
     
    Larry CdeBaca, Jan 10, 2004
    #7
  8. I agree with the reflections and would add some more.
    I wrote this post just after the original, but must have gotten lost in the
    reply system (?).

    The three biggest issues will be:
    1) color temperature of the light in the museum--- do a custom while balance
    from a card with a digital camera, or try an appropriate filter with a film
    camera (good luck on this one)
    2) shake --- use a tripod !
    3) relfections from the glass case -- big one! Use a Polarizing filter and
    experiment with camera position relative to lighting and polarizer settings
    to "tune out" the glare from the glass case.
     
    Doug mcCormac, Jan 10, 2004
    #8
  9. Chris Ranes

    billfrogg Guest

    Most important of all.....ASK PERMISSION.....bill frogg
     
    billfrogg, Jan 21, 2004
    #9
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.