PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS FOR NEWCOMERS

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by CAMERA EXPERT, Aug 4, 2003.

  1. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN PHOTOGRAPHY BUT NEED SOME HELP, PLEASE BE
    SURE TO LEARN THE FOLLOWING TIPS TO PREVENT DISASTER:

    1)Never buy a Minolta 35mm SLR. Minolta is a sub-standard camera
    manufacturer. They had some respect in the 1980's, but that is
    history. They make some OK point and shoot APS cameras, but that is
    about it. If you buy a Minolta SLR, you will be getting a camera with
    poor build construction. You will be limited as far as lenses and
    accessories go. You will be stuck with a non-standard flash mount.
    Minolta AF lenses are not as good as lenses made by Nikkor, Canon,
    Zeiss, or Leica. If you are buying your first 35mm SLR, get a Canon or
    Nikon system. They have the best selection of lenses and accessories
    and much better quality bodies than Minolta or Pentax. Canon is
    slightly better than Nikon. Leica and Contax are great systems too if
    you can afford it.

    2)Do not buy a digital camera until they are available with 20
    megapixel resolution if you intend to print your pictures. That is
    what the equivalent to 35mm film would be. If you are snapping pics
    for the web, then a lower resolution may be acceptable.

    3)Never buy a point and shoot 35mm camera with a zoom longer than 90.
    Even better, try to stick to point and shoots with a fixed focal
    length like the Contax T3, Leica Minilux, or Olympus Stylus Epic QD.

    4)Never buy any color negative film other than Kodak or Fuji. Kodak is
    generally better. If you are shooting black and white film, then you
    can use Kodak, Fuji, or Ilford with good results.

    5)Never shoot any chromogenic (C-41) black and white films. They are
    garbage and have very little contrast.

    6)Never shoot any slide films other than Kodachrome Professional. This
    is the only truly archival slide film. Other slide films (E-6) may
    look good when they are first processed, but give it a year or 2 and
    they will start to fade dramatically.

    7)Never print Kodak film onto Fuji paper, or vice versa. Print film
    only on paper of the same manufacturer.

    8)Never clean your lenses with anything other than a blower brush.

    9)Do not use flash for children under 6 months old. It could
    permanently damage the child's vision.

    10)Keep professional film in the refrigerator until you are ready to
    use it. Take it out 1 hour before and allow it to adjust to room
    temperature before you remove the film from the plastic container and
    load it into the camera. DO NOT keep consumer film in the
    refrigerator...it could slow down the aging process and prevent the
    film from ripening. NEVER STORE ANY FILM IN THE FREEZER DESPITE WHAT
    ANYONE TELLS YOU.

    I OFFER THIS ADVICE TO YOU NEWCOMERS SO YOU DON'T MAKE THE SAME
    MISTAKES TOO MANY PHOTOGRAPHERS MAKE.
     
    CAMERA EXPERT, Aug 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. CAMERA EXPERT

    Paul Heslop Guest

    Thanks... BUT YOU SHOUT TOO MUCH!!!
     
    Paul Heslop, Aug 4, 2003
    #2
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  3. CAMERA EXPERT

    Cheryl Wells Guest

    "Camera Expert"??? roflmao!!!


     
    Cheryl Wells, Aug 4, 2003
    #3
  4. CAMERA EXPERT

    Paul Larson Guest

    (CAMERA EXPERT) wrote in
    Bravo.... arthor arthor!
     
    Paul Larson, Aug 4, 2003
    #4
  5. CAMERA EXPERT

    Hickster0711 Guest

    This one will never see 20 posts. Bob Hickey
     
    Hickster0711, Aug 4, 2003
    #5
  6. CAMERA EXPERT

    Charlie D Guest

    snip drivel
     
    Charlie D, Aug 4, 2003
    #6
  7. CAMERA EXPERT

    Polytone Guest

    Seriously, what was so bad about what he/she wrote? Isn't it universally
    accepted that 35mm film still prints better than any resoluon digital
    available yet? Doesn't Minolta have less accessories and lenses than Canon
    or Nikon? Don't Kodakcrome slides last longer than E6? Yes his "pointer"
    carry some strong opinions, but not all of it is exactly false.
     
    Polytone, Aug 4, 2003
    #7
  8. CAMERA EXPERT

    Charlie D Guest

    That's why I said, "snip drivel" and not "snip pure drivel" as I was
    going to.

    Excellent photographs have been made by not following most of the
    poster's points.

    I, for one had great success with Illford XP-1, their first chromogenic
    B&W film. Everyone loved the tonality of the prints I made from it.
     
    Charlie D, Aug 4, 2003
    #8
  9. CAMERA EXPERT

    Polytone Guest

    Charlie, do you like Konica Monochrome 400?

     
    Polytone, Aug 4, 2003
    #9
  10. CAMERA EXPERT

    Polytone Guest

    The reason I ask is because this is the only C41 B&W film I ever used. I had
    it processed C41 and printed on Konica Impresa color paper at the minilab
    and they came back Sepia.
     
    Polytone, Aug 4, 2003
    #10
  11. CAMERA EXPERT

    stan Guest

    What the hell is with the trolls around here? Who's feeding them and
    why? We need some troll-icide to rid this group of the ever growing
    numbers of these insidious creatures. And they yell a lot too!
    Stan
    Visual Arts Photography
     
    stan, Aug 4, 2003
    #11
  12. CAMERA EXPERT

    Mike Guest

    Stan, there wouldn't be many trolls IF people wouldn't reply.


    Paul Heslop wrote:
    What the hell is with the trolls around here? Who's feeding them and why? We
    need some troll-icide to rid this group of the ever growing numbers of these
    insidious creatures. And they yell a lot too!
    Stan
    Visual Arts Photography
     
    Mike, Aug 4, 2003
    #12
  13. Up to 15 already, 16 if you count mine...
    WhizzzzzzSploidt!
     
    Skip Middleton, Aug 4, 2003
    #13
  14. CAMERA EXPERT

    PTRAVEL Guest

    This is probably a troll, but someone may read it and believe it anyway, so
    here goes . . .

    Everything depends on which camera you buy, and where in the line it is
    situated. It is, frankly, ridiculous to say, "All Minoltas stink," "all
    Canons are great," etc.
    Completely wrong. Everything depends on how large you want to print. With
    a 5+ megapixel camera, you can do prints up to 16" x 20" that will be
    indistinguishable, when viewed with the naked eye, from prints made by a
    chemical process. Given that it is much, much easier to control the final
    output of a digital print than a chemical print, particularly for a
    newcomer, the digital camera is a much better option.
    I agree with that, though the OP doesn't say why. P&S cameras have very
    small lenses which result in a rather dramatic fall-off in light
    transmission at higher focal lengths. Because there is less light, longer
    exposures are necessary. Quite quickly, you reach a point of diminishing
    returns, where the shutter speed is so slow that it guarantees a blurred
    image from camera shake and subject movement.
    Good cameras, all. However, moderate zoom, particularly one that gives you
    a choice between wide angle (28mm is best), normal (between 45 and 55mm) and
    portrait (between 70 and 135mm) will give you the most flexibility. I
    recommend the Olympus Stylus D80 Wide, which has a 28mm to 80mm zoom lens.
    Strictly personal preference. I far prefer Fuji, which is a 4-layer film
    and generally gives more saturated, "snappier" colors than Kodak. This is
    absolutely true at the higher speeds. 800-speed Fuji is virtually
    indistinguishable from its 400-speed brother, whereas Kodak "Max," Kodak's
    general purpose 800-speed film, is grainy and washed out.
    Again, it depends on what you are doing. Kodak makes some very fine grain
    film intended for the T-Max system. However, some people like grain in b&w.
    Well, I agree with that. B&W C-41 is a sop to the 1-hour photofinishers.
    Who cares about archival, if they're amateurs? E-6 has considerably more
    exposure latitutde than Kodachrome Professional, can be developed virtually
    anywhere, is available in faster emulsions, is cheaper and much, much easier
    to handle.
    Utter nonsense. Papers vary, but they're not matched to film emulsions. A
    good lab can pull a good print based on whatever they're optimized for.
    Why? Microfiber cloth is fine if the lens has dirt deposits that can't be
    blown away.
    I wouldn't know.
    Amateurs rarely, if ever, use professional film. It is expensive (unless
    bought in bulk), should be refrigerated, as you've indicated, and won't
    produce better results than the more rugged amateur emulsions. The point of
    professional film is consistency of results from roll to roll. Amateurs
    don't care about that at all. They're much more concerned with getting good
    results from film they bought 6 months before, or that was left in the glove
    compartment of their car, etc.
    Well, yes.
    "Ripening"? Give me a break.
    There's no benefit to doing so, but I don't see the harm.
    The best advice is never listen to someone who says, "Never . . ."
     
    PTRAVEL, Aug 4, 2003
    #14
  15. Every one of his "points" contained one part truth and several parts that,
    to be kind, were arguable. For instance, Minolta does indeed have fewer
    lenses and accessories than some of their competitors, but their build
    quality and lens quality are on a par with Canon and Nikon, if not, in some
    cases, superior. It IS generally accepted that it doesn't take a resolution
    in excess of 20mp to equal the quality of film printed in sizes up to 16x20.
    Agfa, among others, makes some very good color negative film.
    I could go on, but that would be pointless.
    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
     
    Skip Middleton, Aug 4, 2003
    #15
  16. Ilford XP-2 is an excellent film, though.

    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
     
    Skip Middleton, Aug 4, 2003
    #16
  17. You shouldn't form an opinion of an entire genre of film from one poor
    example, poorly printed.
     
    Skip Middleton, Aug 4, 2003
    #17
  18. CAMERA EXPERT

    PTRAVEL Guest

    See my post.
    Yes and no. Up to 11 x 14, with a 5 megapixel camera and a good printer you
    won't be able to see the difference without a loupe. A 6+ megapixel camera,
    like Canon's 10D, should take you up to 16 x 20 without a noticeable
    difference. Remember, too, that amateurs have their film developed at
    1-hour photo labs. The best of them are quite good, and the worst of them
    are hideous, but it's hit or miss, depending on how good the lab is about
    temperatures, contamination and replenishment. For the darkroom amateur, it
    is far, far easier to fine-tune a shot for good results digitally than
    through filtration, paper selection and temperature control. It's also a
    lot easier to get consistently good shots through digital processing than
    chemical -- the latter requires a fair amount of discipline to get
    consistent results.
    How many lenses and accessories does a beginner need?
    Yes, they do (Kodachrome, that is). They're also far more difficult and
    expensive to have processed, and the emulsions are far less forgiving of
    exposure errors. Why would beginners want to work with Kodachrome? for
    that matter, why would beginners want to work with slides?
    Some are false, and others are just plain misleading. The point, though, is
    they're offered as fact, rather than opinion.
     
    PTRAVEL, Aug 4, 2003
    #18
  19. CAMERA EXPERT

    Polytone Guest

    Actually I liked how they came. I never saw it printed on B&W paper.
     
    Polytone, Aug 4, 2003
    #19
  20. CAMERA EXPERT

    Charlie D Guest

    For learning.

    I shot B&W and developed my own film and made my own prints. I wasn't
    capable of printing color, so all my color work was with slides.

    How can you learn photography by having a lab do the work on print film?
    I remember, I did shoot some color negs and experimented with exopsure
    compensation. The automatic printing machine removed all differences in
    exposure.

    This was back in the "old days" when color printing was, IMO very
    technical and required expensive equipment. I tried Cibachrome once and
    my mind just doesn't work in CYMK.

    Nowadays we can have our print film developed by a lab, scan the negs
    and print them using photoshop and RGB thinking.
     
    Charlie D, Aug 4, 2003
    #20
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