Photos on sunny days - overexposure?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Brett, Apr 11, 2005.

  1. Brett

    Brett Guest

    I have an Olympus C2100. I usually take photos in manual mode. On a bright
    sunny day, I always have problems with overexposure. I have these settings
    for sunny days:
    - Aperature @ F8.0
    - Shutter speed at 1/800
    - ISO @ 100

    and still I can't get the exposure compensation/differential any lower than
    +0.3, which means slight overexposure. The target for a decent exposure is
    0.0 but I always shoot at -0.3 for richer colors. Sometimes I can't get any
    lower than +1.7, which gives a very over exposed photo. It seems I've maxed
    out all of my settings. I'm sure there is a way to do it though. Any
    suggestions on how I can get below 0.0?

    Also, given the above, how can I shoot slow motion? Say I want to capture a
    water fall on a bright sunny day so that the water looks like a blurred
    mass. Ticking down the shutter speed will greatly increase the exposure
    comp/diff.

    Thanks,
    Brett
     
    Brett, Apr 11, 2005
    #1
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  2. Brett

    dadiOH Guest

    No idea how you get overexposure with those settings...a "normal"
    shutter speed for that f-stop/light condition/ISO would be more like
    1/250 - 1/400.

    Perhaps your shutter isn't accurate?

    _________________

    Use neutral density filters and a small stop so the shutter can be
    slowed as needed.

    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Apr 11, 2005
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  3. Brett

    Stan de SD Guest

    Yep, his settings would result in one stop underexposure by the old "sunny
    F16" rule.
     
    Stan de SD, Apr 11, 2005
    #3
  4. Brett

    Munk Guest

    Have you tried a Neutral density filter? I believe this would give the
    effects you are after.
    Hope this helps

    j
     
    Munk, Apr 11, 2005
    #4
  5. Brett

    brett Guest

    Actually, I hadn't heard of that. Looks like they go for between $20
    and $40. Is one better than the other or do you recommend any?

    Also, what exactly does it do?

    Thanks,
    Brett
     
    brett, Apr 11, 2005
    #5
  6. Brett

    Mike Kohary Guest

    I'm not familiar with your particular camera, so I'm not sure what it's
    capable of, but you can achieve a darker exposure by either reducing the ISO
    (lower number), reducing the aperture (higher number), or increasing the
    shutter speed (higher number). As for the waterfall question, it may just
    be that you need a camera with more flexible manual settings. It's easy to
    shoot a waterfall on a sunny day with a long exposure, but you need to be
    able to stop down the aperture significantly (i.e. higher number, much
    higher than 8.0).
     
    Mike Kohary, Apr 12, 2005
    #6
  7. Brett

    dadiOH Guest

    Think sunglasses...


    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
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    dadiOH, Apr 12, 2005
    #7
  8. Brett

    Brett Guest

    But will that distort the photo?
     
    Brett, Apr 12, 2005
    #8
  9. Brett

    paul Guest



    Think bifocal sunglasses.
     
    paul, Apr 12, 2005
    #9
  10. Brett

    dadiOH Guest

    Not unless they are made from old Coke bottles.

    BTW, you may already have a weak neutral density filter...a polarizer.


    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Apr 12, 2005
    #10
  11. Brett

    dadiOH Guest

    It was an analogy...sunglasses are to eyes as neutral density filters
    are to cameras.

    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Apr 12, 2005
    #11
  12. Brett

    Munk Guest

    If you are interested in a ND filter, its worth looking at some samples
    first, as you can get them in different powers, all they do in darken the
    image and so long as you go for a reasonable make, you should not loose
    quality. These filters are great for getting the effect you are after with
    water, as they allow for much longer exposures, on sunny days, these filters
    are also available in graduate form, witch means only half the filter has
    the darkened effect, ideal for shooting, sky and land at the same time, when
    the sky would usually be to bright to do so.
    Hope this helps

    j
     
    Munk, Apr 12, 2005
    #12
  13. Brett

    Munk Guest

    If you get one from ebay, there are some Hoya ones that range from around
    $13 up to about $30 dependant on size, I believe hoya are a reasonable make.
    I use hoya filters, and am very pleased with them.

    j
     
    Munk, Apr 12, 2005
    #13
  14. Brett

    Brett Guest

    How is it used?
     
    Brett, Apr 13, 2005
    #14
  15. Brett

    Brett Guest

    What about size? I see there are 30.5mm, 43mm, 55mm, 58mm, 62mm.

    Also, I have a small clear Hoya 49mm UV[0] filter. It came with my camera.
    What exactly is it used for?

    Thanks,
    Brett
     
    Brett, Apr 13, 2005
    #15
  16. Brett

    Munk Guest

    You need to get the size that fits your camera, if it came with a 49mm and
    that fits, you need a 49mm one. The UV stands for ultra violet. I use one of
    these all the time, I cant honestly say I see any difference from using it,
    but I have it on just to protect my lens, (a new filter is a lot cheaper
    than a new lens).
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=67346&item=7506743772&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW
    here is one on ebay. but this is the weakest strength you can get. usually
    There are 3 different strengths. The strengths are usually referred to in
    different ways, depending on filter make. Hoya use 2x, 4x and 8x (8 being
    strongest), and others like lee filters display as 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 (0.9
    strongest). The strengths are approximately the same as decreasing the
    aperture by a stop, so the weakest is equivalent to 1 stop, next 2 stops,
    and strongest 3 stops.

    Hope this helps
    j

     
    Munk, Apr 13, 2005
    #16
  17. Brett

    brett Guest

    Why do you say the one on eBay is the weakest strength you can get? It
    has three stop settings just as you mentioned there should be. What
    specifically tells you what the strength is and how do you know what is
    weak/strong?

    Thanks,
    Brett
     
    brett, Apr 13, 2005
    #17
  18. Brett

    dadiOH Guest

    You might want to consider another hobby. Preferably, one that requires
    no reading comprehension.

    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Apr 14, 2005
    #18
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