Photoshop CS4 Vibrance vs Saturation

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by Jane P, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. Jane P

    Jane P Guest

    Hi,
    I'm trying to work out exactly what is the different between the Vibrance
    and Saturation adjustments in CS4. I have been using them in Camera RAW for
    a while now, and I see Vibrance is now an adjustment in CS4's menu.

    I'm yet to find anyone who can give me a satisfactory answer as to the
    difference. Saying that vibrance is just saturating those colours that don't
    get saturated makes no sense to me.

    Anyone have any clearer explanation?
     
    Jane P, Jun 21, 2009
    #1
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  2. Jane P

    Rob Guest

    have a look at whats happening through Bridge when camera raw is used to
    open up a file.


    there has been some good tutorials as to all the functions when using
    camera raw in bridge. (google)
     
    Rob, Jun 21, 2009
    #2
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  3. Jane P

    Paul Furman Guest

    I just tried on an urban scene with blue skies, orange & red signs and
    gray paving of subtly different colors. I set up a history sequence to
    toggle back & forth, vibrance made the sky crazy dark blue, saturation
    boosted the reds. The asphalt barely changed, the sidewalk happened to
    be kinda flesh toned & didn't change at all. Pale blue-white signs
    turned dark blue. So maybe another simplified explanation is it brings
    out blues without going overboard on reds.

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Jul 28, 2009
    #3
  4. Jane P

    Paul Furman Guest

    I saw a Lightroom tutorial that added 'snap' to an expanse of boring
    road & gray building in an otherwise nice photo. I never really use it
    though I tried.

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Jul 28, 2009
    #4
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