Photoshopped a guy out of wheelchair?

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by RichA, Mar 13, 2014.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    RichA, Mar 13, 2014
    #1
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  2. RichA

    Mort Guest

    Mort, Mar 14, 2014
    #2
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  3. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : This guy appears to be standing. But he's been confined to a wheelchair for several years now.
    :
    : http://cdn.pjmedia.com/tatler/files/2014/03/Screenshot-2014-03-11-13.38.54.png

    Shades of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. For the thirteen years Roosevelt was
    President, he couldn't walk. He pretended to, but was actually held up by two
    aides masquerading, I guess, as bodyguards. Most people didn't realize what
    was going on.

    Roosevelt refused to be photographed in a wheelchair, and the compliant press
    of the time went along. So only a couple of such photographs made it into
    print. Nowadays, Roosevelt would be admired for overcoming a physical handicap
    so effectively; but at the time, he feared that his political opponents would
    exploit it as an inherent sign of weakness.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Mar 20, 2014
    #3
  4. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    Robert Coe, Mar 20, 2014
    #4
  5. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Roosevelt shouldn't have been ridiculed for being crippled, should have been ridiculed for being an addled clown who gave 1/2 of Europe to the Soviets.
     
    RichA, Mar 20, 2014
    #5
  6. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    I see your knowledge of history is a tad lacking.
    It was some guy named Churchill who made a secret agreement with Stalin,
    and was concerned that the US would find out, and stop aiding the
    British imperialists. If Britain had one bit of courage, WWII would not
    have happened.
     
    PeterN, Mar 20, 2014
    #6
  7. RichA

    Eric Stevens Guest

    That's a rather vague accusation. Exactly what secret agreement are
    you referring to?

    I think Robert Coe was referring to the agreement reached at the Yalta
    conference in 1945.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yalta_Conference tells you more about it.

    In particular, this summarises what each wanted:

    "Each leader had an agenda for the Yalta Conference: Roosevelt
    wanted Soviet support in the U.S. Pacific War against Japan,
    specifically invading Japan, as well as Soviet participation in the
    United Nations; Churchill pressed for free elections and democratic
    governments in Eastern and Central Europe (specifically Poland);
    and Stalin demanded a Soviet sphere of political influence in
    Eastern and Central Europe, an essential aspect of the USSR's
    national security strategy."

    Roosevelt largely supported Stalin and what they each got is now well
    known.
     
    Eric Stevens, Mar 20, 2014
    #7
  8. RichA

    Savageduck Guest

    The big loser at Yalta was Churchill, he had nothing to bargain with.
    He tried to save Poland, the Balkans and Greece, from the Westward
    Soviet push. Tito already had his ruthless hand in the Balkans, and
    Greece came within a hair's breath of becoming part of the Warsaw Pact
    with the post War communist insurrection.
     
    Savageduck, Mar 20, 2014
    #8
  9. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On Thu, 20 Mar 2014 14:39:15 -0400, PeterN
    :
    : >On 3/20/2014 2:58 AM, RichA wrote:
    : >> On Wednesday, March 19, 2014 10:45:11 PM UTC-4, Robert Coe wrote:
    : >>>
    : >>> : This guy appears to be standing. But he's been confined to a wheelchair for several years now.
    : >>>
    : >>> :
    : >>>
    : >>> : http://cdn.pjmedia.com/tatler/files/2014/03/Screenshot-2014-03-11-13.38.54.png
    : >>>
    : >>>
    : >>>
    : >>> Shades of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. For the thirteen years Roosevelt was
    : >>>
    : >>> President, he couldn't walk. He pretended to, but was actually held up by two
    : >>>
    : >>> aides masquerading, I guess, as bodyguards. Most people didn't realize what
    : >>>
    : >>> was going on.
    : >>>
    : >>>
    : >>>
    : >>> Roosevelt refused to be photographed in a wheelchair, and the compliant press
    : >>>
    : >>> of the time went along. So only a couple of such photographs made it into
    : >>>
    : >>> print. Nowadays, Roosevelt would be admired for overcoming a physical handicap
    : >>>
    : >>> so effectively; but at the time, he feared that his political opponents would
    : >>>
    : >>> exploit it as an inherent sign of weakness.
    : >>>
    : >>>
    : >>>
    : >>> Bob
    : >>
    : >> Roosevelt shouldn't have been ridiculed for being crippled, should have been ridiculed for being an addled clown who gave 1/2 of Europe to the Soviets.
    : >>
    : >
    : >I see your knowledge of history is a tad lacking.
    : >It was some guy named Churchill who made a secret agreement with Stalin,
    : >and was concerned that the US would find out, and stop aiding the
    : >British imperialists. If Britain had one bit of courage, WWII would not
    : >have happened.
    :
    : That's a rather vague accusation. Exactly what secret agreement are
    : you referring to?
    :
    : I think Robert Coe was referring to the agreement reached at the Yalta
    : conference in 1945.

    Me? No, that was Rich (if, indeed, he was referring to Yalta).

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Mar 21, 2014
    #9
  10. RichA

    Eric Stevens Guest

    Sorry about that.

    Actually the bit I was responding to was written by PeterN. I don't
    quite know what secret agreement he was referring to, but it can't
    have been reached by Churchill as England was already committed to WW2
    well before Churchill was made Prime Minister.
     
    Eric Stevens, Mar 21, 2014
    #10
  11. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    There was an agreement between Churchill and Stalin that essentially
    said the Soviets would have influence in Poland and the Brits would have
    influence in Greece. They knew the US would not be happy about that
    return to European imperialism, so we did not lern bout it until it was
    too late.
     
    PeterN, Mar 23, 2014
    #11
  12. RichA

    Eric Stevens Guest

    When and where was that reached?
     
    Eric Stevens, Mar 23, 2014
    #12
  13. RichA

    Savageduck Guest

    Aah! The myths of reimagined history.
     
    Savageduck, Mar 23, 2014
    #13
  14. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    Google "naughty document," before yo eat.
     
    PeterN, Mar 23, 2014
    #14
  15. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    PeterN, Mar 23, 2014
    #15
  16. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    The reality is that it doesn't matter what deals were cut, the Soviets
    had boots on the ground in every place east of Germany and Austria and
    halfway through both of those and it would have taken concerted military
    action by the US and British to dislodge them. The difference is that
    once the French, Germans, and Austrians in the US/British occupied zones
    had a government back up and running that didn't look likely to start a
    war the US and British went home, but the Soviets didn't leave until
    their economy collapsed half a century later.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 23, 2014
    #16
  17. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    Sadly, no myth
     
    PeterN, Mar 23, 2014
    #17
  18. RichA

    nemo Guest

    nemo, Mar 23, 2014
    #18
  19. RichA

    Eric Stevens Guest

    Aah! Thanks.

    That led me to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percentages_agreement

    The document seems to have been the subject of a discussion rather
    than an agreement. Poland does not appear to have been discussed.

    Churchill's attitude is indicated by:

    "Might it not be thought rather cynical if it seemed we had disposed
    of these issues so fateful to millions of people, in such an
    offhand manner? Let us burn the paper", said Churchill."

    "No, you keep it", replied Stalin."

    Apart from that, it seems to have been an idea which had been around
    for a long time.

    "A draft document of the agreement, which was yet to be made in
    1944, appeared under strange circumstances when it was supposedly
    intercepted in 1943 and fell into the hands of Spanish dictator
    Francisco Franco's secret service."

    .... a draft of a 1944 document found in 1943. That it "fell into the
    hands" of the non-communist "Spanish dictator Francisco Franco's
    secret service" suggests that it came from the communist side. It may
    have been an indication of what Russia was truly aiming for, or it may
    have been designed to stir up trouble.

    As for the US not learning about things until it was too late:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moscow_Conference_(1944)

    " ... also present as were the United States ambassador to Moscow,
    Averell Harriman, and General John R. Deane, head of the United
    States Military Mission in Moscow as observers."
     
    Eric Stevens, Mar 23, 2014
    #19
  20. RichA

    Eric Stevens Guest

    Eric Stevens, Mar 23, 2014
    #20
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