[PICS] frustration of hummingbirds

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by jimkramer, Aug 23, 2008.

  1. jimkramer

    jimkramer Guest

    jimkramer, Aug 23, 2008
    #1
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  2. jimkramer

    Annika1980 Guest

    Annika1980, Aug 23, 2008
    #2
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  3. jimkramer

    jimkramer Guest

    If you click on the crops it takes you to a 100% sized version. If I'm
    putting up big stuff the C notice goes with it. ah-la ->
    http://www.jlkramer.net/Pictures/HB/morning1.htm
    http://www.jlkramer.net/Pictures/HB/morning2.htm
    http://www.jlkramer.net/Pictures/HB/morning3.htm
    http://www.jlkramer.net/Pictures/HB/morning4.htm
    http://www.jlkramer.net/Pictures/HB/morning5.htm

    -Jim
     
    jimkramer, Aug 23, 2008
    #3
  4. jimkramer

    jimkramer Guest

    Tell me about it! I wasted most of this morning trying to shoot those
    buggers. Most of the shots need some loving treatment after the fact.

    But with a little work you can take a RAW capture like this:
    http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/102060398

    and turn it into this:
    http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/102060394/original



    Think that I'll work on my technique a bit before I bother trying to fix a
    questionable image. But damn those things are fast.
    -Jim
     
    jimkramer, Aug 23, 2008
    #4
  5. jimkramer

    Eric Miller Guest

    It needn't be so frustrating. Didn't you just move to Mississippi? If you
    will put all your feeders within 10 feet of each other (and the First Nature
    one that is in your photo is inexpensive and one of the best available) you
    will, within the next two week or so, you will have too many hummingbirds to
    photograph.

    At that point set up a pancake style humminbird feeder (humzinger and Perky
    Pet Oasis are two examples of this type) supported from the bottom and place
    it about 30 feet away from the other feeders and in the shade. It will get
    regular visits and will likely only get one hummer at a time (with some
    fighting).

    Get your flash off camera and set it to a manual setting of 1/2 or full
    power. Put it at a height of about two feet above the feeder pointing at the
    feeder at a downward and horizontal angle of about 45 degrees to the line of
    sight from the camera. Use a small diffuser that does not send light in
    directions leading away from the subject, such as the Westcott Micro Apollo
    or the $5 foamcore one here:

    http://www.dyesscreek.com/hidden_pages/diffuser.html

    What you don't want is a Gary Fong Lightsphere, cut alcohol bottle, Sto-Fen
    Omni-Bounce or anything that will send your flash's light to places where
    your subject isn't. If you two flashes, put one on either side of the bird,
    again, pointing away from you and down at the bird at about a 45 degree
    angle on both axes. If you don't have two flashes, use a piece of white
    foamcore as a reflector on the opposite side of the bird.

    Your camera should be at a level approximately six inches above the feeder,
    which is the same level the bird will be most of the time that you shoot it.

    Put thumbtacks in the holes of the feeder leaving only one open and orient
    it such that you will get the side of the hummer that you want. Rotate the
    feeder to get different "poses." Cut the perches off the feeder if it has
    them and they cannot be removed any other way. After the hummingbird sips,
    it will "back up" and hover for a moment before sipping again. Shoot it
    while it is hovering in-between sips.

    Let the wings blur. They look natural that way and the trade-offs are worth
    it:

    http://www.dyesscreek.com/birds/index.php?dir=hummingbirds

    During mid-september, and especially after any big storm blows through, you
    will be able to shoot hundreds of shots in one sitting.

    Eric Miller
    www.dyesscreek.com
     
    Eric Miller, Aug 27, 2008
    #5
  6. jimkramer

    Annika1980 Guest

    You guys are lucky. I have 4 hummers at my place. I have 3 feeders
    surrounding my deck.
    Good luck with that!

    If I set my camera outside on a tripod the hummers will sometimes buzz
    it so you might be able to get the shot that way with a remote cable.
    I can go out with my red shirt and red cap on and they'll buzz right
    by my ears.
     
    Annika1980, Aug 27, 2008
    #6
  7. jimkramer

    Noons Guest

    Eric Miller wrote,on my timestamp of 28/08/2008 1:37 AM:


    and don't forget to paste in a few blossoms to replace
    that ugly feeder...

    So tell me something: how do you get blurred wings
    with two flashes? Do you slow down lightspeed as
    well? Last time I looked, the exposure time of a flash
    burst will freeze solid any moving wings.

    or just photoslop them in from another shot, blur and all.
    Bret would.
     
    Noons, Aug 27, 2008
    #7
  8. jimkramer

    Paul Furman Guest

    Paul Furman, Aug 27, 2008
    #8
  9. jimkramer

    Eric Miller Guest

    OOPS! Wrong link. The diffuser link that I wanted to post is the following:

    http://www.dyesscreek.com/hummingbirds/softbox/index.html

    The one that was posted was on a different subject entirely and used the
    wrong type of diffuser for hummingbird photography.

    Eric Miller
    www.dyesscreek.com
     
    Eric Miller, Aug 27, 2008
    #9
  10. jimkramer

    jimkramer Guest

    jimkramer, Aug 27, 2008
    #10
  11. jimkramer

    Eric Miller Guest

    Soon you will have many more birds coming through and a lot of adult males
    will lead the crowd.

    "Truism" is the word I think you are looking for if my wife is correct.
    Good luck with that. Give a 70-200 with a 1.4x teleconverter a try if you
    just want to get close. For filling the frame, my lens of choice is a 400mm
    5.6 (Canon's EF 400 5/5.6L) with an extension tube, somewhere around 35mm
    length.
    No. But I have tested lighting from different angles but never got around to
    posting a web page on that subject. My verdict is: illuminate from above. A
    rubythroat's gorget will light up best if illuminated from above while the
    bird is facing you. Of course, this is foiled by the bird sometimes because
    they can apparently control whether the red shows or not. After testing by
    placing the flash at different angles to the feeder and rotating the feeder
    to change the position of the birds, it dawned on me that I probably should
    have known this anyway since that is where their light comes when not being
    photographed. Anyway, this photo shows the bird with light hitting the bird
    at an approximate 45 degree downward angle and from about the same angle to
    the right and left of the line from the lens to the bird:

    http://www.dyesscreek.com/birds/index.php?display=hummingbirds/crw_6372.jpg
    For attracting them to the yard, the three most successful plants that I
    have are:

    Mimosa a.k.a. Silk Tree - when this blooms in spring, my hummingbird numbers
    grow significantly.

    Turk's Cap - when this blooms in late summer and fall (right now) the birds
    will ignore the feeders until they have drained this plant first.

    Coral Honeysuckle - another plant that the birds will feed from before the
    feeder.


    Eric Miller
    www.dyesscreek.com
     
    Eric Miller, Aug 27, 2008
    #11
  12. jimkramer

    Annika1980 Guest

    Not unless you have a VERY high-speed flash unit.
    Hummingbird wings beat so fast you'd need about 1/15,000 of a second
    to freeze it totally.
     
    Annika1980, Aug 28, 2008
    #12
  13. jimkramer

    Noons Guest

    Annika1980 wrote,on my timestamp of 28/08/2008 10:45 AM:
    Just to prove what sort of a liar you are:
    http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2000/MarkLevin.shtml

    If you take a flash to a spinning airplane propeller,
    you'll freeze the action right there. Even 1/1000 will do it.
    Hummingbirds beat their wings much, much slower than
    a spinning propeller, at around 60Hz.
    That's why they are called "humming": the noise
    from their wings is a low pitch "hum".

    Or in photo terms, around 1/60 second.
    If you used the default synch speed of your camera
    of around 1/200, the wings would be nearly frozen solid.
    So how come the hummie bodies show evidence of flash
    light reflection but the wings are blurred?
    Strange flash you have, that has a flash burst speed of
    less than 1/60. May I suggest you try to sell it
    in epay? Must be worth a fortune!

    Like I said: nothing like letting a liar like
    you talk. It shows straight away what you
    claim is nothing but crap. But everyone already
    knew that, it's only you who can't fathom how silly
    you really make yourself look.
     
    Noons, Aug 28, 2008
    #13
  14. jimkramer

    Annika1980 Guest

    You are an idiot.

    If a hummer beats his wings at 50 beats per second then the wings will
    make one full cycle of motion in 1/50 of a second. At a shutter speed
    of 1/200 of a second the wings will go through 1/4 of their total
    cycle of motion. In other words they'll move a couple of inches in
    the time that the shutter is open. So tell us again how 1/200 is
    going to freeze the motion? Better yet, provide us ANY examples of
    that happening without the use of high-speed flash.
     
    Annika1980, Aug 28, 2008
    #14
  15. jimkramer

    jimkramer Guest

    You are an idiot.

    If a hummer beats his wings at 50 beats per second then the wings will
    make one full cycle of motion in 1/50 of a second. At a shutter speed
    of 1/200 of a second the wings will go through 1/4 of their total
    cycle of motion. In other words they'll move a couple of inches in
    the time that the shutter is open. So tell us again how 1/200 is
    going to freeze the motion? Better yet, provide us ANY examples of
    that happening without the use of high-speed flash.


    The difference between someone that is just ignorant and someone that is
    just an idiot; you can teach the ignorance away, not so with the idiotcy.
    You have clearly identified the problem; the only logical course of action
    should also be painfully apparent, lest we begin to categorize you as
    well. -Jim
     
    jimkramer, Aug 28, 2008
    #15
  16. jimkramer

    Annika1980 Guest

    So I should ignore the idiot? Gotcha.
    Having said that, it is sometimes tough to let some of his blatant
    lies stand.
     
    Annika1980, Aug 28, 2008
    #16
  17. jimkramer

    jimkramer Guest

    So I should ignore the idiot? Gotcha.
    Having said that, it is sometimes tough to let some of his blatant
    lies stand.



    The only one paying him any attention is you. Again, the logical course of
    action...
    -Jim
     
    jimkramer, Aug 28, 2008
    #17
  18. jimkramer

    Noons Guest

    Annika1980 wrote,on my timestamp of 29/08/2008 1:00 AM:
    You took the words off my mouth.
    Thanks for admitting it.

    And that somehow is 1/15000 of a second?
    And that proves they move at 1/15000second how?
    By firing a flash at it that has a 1/1000th of a second
    exposure duration, dickhead?
    of WHAT happening, dickhead?
     
    Noons, Aug 29, 2008
    #18
  19. jimkramer

    Noons Guest

    jimkramer wrote,on my timestamp of 29/08/2008 1:11 AM:

    "Hummingbird wings beat so fast you'd need about 1/15,000 of a second
    to freeze it totally. "

    the words of YOUR idiot. not mine.
     
    Noons, Aug 29, 2008
    #19
  20. jimkramer

    Noons Guest

    Annika1980 wrote,on my timestamp of 29/08/2008 1:31 AM:

    "Hummingbird wings beat so fast you'd need about 1/15,000 of a second
    to freeze it totally. "

    nothing like letting your lies stand on their own.
     
    Noons, Aug 29, 2008
    #20
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