Ping camera club members

Discussion in 'Photography' started by PeterN, Aug 13, 2013.

  1. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    My club is having a discussion on the use of pre-canned textures in images.

    We have no rule against extensive use of editing in images. There is no
    question that members may use textures, if the member created the
    texture. One thought is that the use of pre-canned textures, constitutes
    the use of someone elses pixels in th emaker's work. The other thinks
    that use of the texture is more like use of a brush, if the texture is
    not a prominent part of the image. Just wondering of this question has
    come up in other clubs.
     
    PeterN, Aug 13, 2013
    #1
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  2. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Our club is very specific about it, but unable to control it.

    Our club's rule is that any image that is a combination of two or more
    images must be entered in the "Creative" category. Anything is
    allowable in Creative.

    If a texture is applied to an image, what the person is doing is
    bringing another image as a layer and adding it to first image.

    The "unable to control it" bit is where a texture is brought in that
    way but removed on all but a part of the image. Last night a member
    submitted an image of an antique doll. He'd applied a "peeling paint"
    texture to just the face by adding it as a layer but then painting it
    away everywhere but the face. It was quite effective.

    He was puzzled about if it should go in Color or Creative. He put it
    in color.

    What appears to be legal is adding a filter effect to an image. That
    doesn't add a layer and isn't a new image. But, you can add a
    duplicate layer to your original, add the "Oil Painting" filter to the
    duplicate, turn that layer into a Layer Mask, and paint out the effect
    everywhere but in one area.

    I haven't checked, but there are probably filters available that can
    be added to PS, and that are the same as textures. So you have a
    legal texture.
     
    Tony Cooper, Aug 13, 2013
    #2
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  3. PeterN

    Savageduck Guest

    OnOne has some textures in their PhotoFrame plugin, but it is still
    easier to take a stock texture image you have shot yourself. Something
    such as a rough concrete wall or a piece of canvas. I have several of
    those stockpiled.

    So I can take an image such as this open in CS6:
    < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/_DNC5967-E1w.jpg >

    Take one of my stock textures and open it in CS6,
    < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/Tex-DSC_7651.jpg >

    and because I am working on a B&W image, I just go to gray scale.
    Select all, copy and paste the texture into a new layer over the image
    I am working on. I convert that to a smart object and free transform so
    I can get it to cover the subject image. Then I drop the opacity to
    taste to get my final result.
    < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/_DNC5967-ETw.jpg >
     
    Savageduck, Aug 14, 2013
    #3
  4. PeterN

    Robert Coe Guest

    : My club is having a discussion on the use of pre-canned textures in images.
    :
    : We have no rule against extensive use of editing in images. There is no
    : question that members may use textures, if the member created the texture.
    : One thought is that the use of pre-canned textures, constitutes the use
    : of someone elses pixels in the maker's work. ...

    Would he think the same about the use of pre-canned white balance profiles or
    a predefined noise reduction or sharpening algorithm or the 16:9 aspect ratio
    (surely the invention of a historically identifiable human engineer) or a lens
    with a 9-blade aperture, etc.?

    Of course if the member claimed to have created the texture but provably
    didn't, that would be a different matter. Right? Or so one could argue.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 14, 2013
    #4
  5. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    Nice use of a grunge.

    That's perfectly legal in our club, in all categories. the issue under
    discussion is whether you must make your own textures. I have about 50
    of them that I created. However, I am deliberately not stating how i
    feel about the question.
     
    PeterN, Aug 14, 2013
    #5
  6. PeterN

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On Tue, 13 Aug 2013 17:48:01 -0400, PeterN
    :
    : >My club is having a discussion on the use of pre-canned textures in images.
    : >
    : >We have no rule against extensive use of editing in images. There is no
    : >question that members may use textures, if the member created the
    : >texture. One thought is that the use of pre-canned textures, constitutes
    : >the use of someone elses pixels in th emaker's work. The other thinks
    : >that use of the texture is more like use of a brush, if the texture is
    : >not a prominent part of the image. Just wondering of this question has
    : >come up in other clubs.
    :
    : Our club is very specific about it, but unable to control it.
    :
    : Our club's rule is that any image that is a combination of two or more
    : images must be entered in the "Creative" category. Anything is
    : allowable in Creative.
    :
    : If a texture is applied to an image, what the person is doing is
    : bringing another image as a layer and adding it to first image.

    Oh come on, Tony. Does your club seriously believe that?

    : The "unable to control it" bit is where a texture is brought in that
    : way but removed on all but a part of the image. Last night a member
    : submitted an image of an antique doll. He'd applied a "peeling paint"
    : texture to just the face by adding it as a layer but then painting it
    : away everywhere but the face. It was quite effective.
    :
    : He was puzzled about if it should go in Color or Creative. He put it
    : in color.

    OK if he said what he did. But he loses most of the points he would have
    gotten for creativity if he had entered it in the "Creative" class.

    : What appears to be legal is adding a filter effect to an image. That
    : doesn't add a layer and isn't a new image. But, you can add a
    : duplicate layer to your original, add the "Oil Painting" filter to the
    : duplicate, turn that layer into a Layer Mask, and paint out the effect
    : everywhere but in one area.
    :
    : I haven't checked, but there are probably filters available that can
    : be added to PS, and that are the same as textures. So you have a
    : legal texture.

    It has been claimed that an infinite number of angels can dance on the head of
    a pin, because although an angel can be arbitrarily large, they take up no
    space.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 14, 2013
    #6
  7. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    We discussed a similar point. The difference being that pre-canned
    profiles were used to manipulate the maker's pixels, whereas the
    textures constituted the introduction of a thrd party's pixels.
     
    PeterN, Aug 14, 2013
    #7
  8. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Yes, if it's done the way I do it or the way the Duck has explained. I
    haven't done much in the way of textures, but I have a decent file of
    texture shots I've taken. These are close-ups of parts of building
    and walls and such. I recently added an old paint texture by shooting
    the siding of a old house that has been abandoned.

    My texture is an image, plain and simple. If I use that in a layer
    over another image, there's no question that I'm combining two images.

    It's no different than if I would take the head off a person in one
    image and put it on the body of a person in another image...two images
    made into one in Photoshop.

    I don't know about those stock textures you download because I've
    never investigated them. But, it seems you save them as a .jpg and
    bring them into your image as a new layer and then reduced the opacity
    of the texture layer. Two images made into one in Photoshop.
    He probably placed higher in Color than he would have in Creative. We
    have some Photoshop people in the club who do fantastic things and
    enter them in this group. Things you'd expect to see in one of those
    Photoshop magazines you see in the bookstore.
     
    Tony Cooper, Aug 14, 2013
    #8
  9. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Exactly what I was referring to. That's against the rules in Color or
    Monochrome, but OK in Creative. That's two images combined into one.
    Your texture is a .jpg.

    I have a file of texture shots I've taken, but never ended up using
    any. I just haven't found the right image for a texture overlay.
     
    Tony Cooper, Aug 14, 2013
    #9
  10. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    On 8/13/2013 11:19 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:


    What I had in mind was use of a texture as a background. You put the
    texture layer on to pf the image and then play around with the blending
    modes, so the texture layer actually appears as a background. I have
    seen demonstrations of this, but have not yet done it.
     
    PeterN, Aug 14, 2013
    #10
  11. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I forget if you have Photoshop or not.

    If you do, you can work with a texture using Blending Modes if you
    want to. You can also add a texture as a layer above your primary
    layer. In doing that, you can change the appearance of the texture by
    changing Hue/Saturation, Contrast, and Opacity of that layer.

    Further, you can make that layer a Layer Mask and paint out parts of
    it that you don't want to have texture applied to. For example,
    painting out everything but the texture on the face or everything but
    the texture on the face.

    I know *some* of the basics of using textures, but I've never tried
    the Blending Mode route. Actually, I've never finished an image with
    any texture, but I have applied some, looked at it, and decided not to
    go with it.

    Also, keep in mind using the built-in filters that Photoshop has in
    the Filter Gallery. You can apply any of them to an image after
    duplicating the primary image and then using the Layer Mask route to
    paint out areas where you don't want the filter effect to apply.

    This should keep you busy for a while.
     
    Tony Cooper, Aug 14, 2013
    #11
  12. PeterN

    Savageduck Guest


    That is a texture background, not an overlay.

    Doing it that way is somewhat different, and the effect can be very different.
    One issue is, with the subject image on top of the texture the blending
    modes are effectively limited to; "Overlay", "Soft Light", "Hard
    Light", "Vivid Light", "Linear Light", "Pin Light", & "Hard Mix". Then
    you cannot adjust layer transparency to the upper subject layer, only
    to the bottom texture layer.

    As always with Photoshop there are quite a few ways to get things done.
     
    Savageduck, Aug 14, 2013
    #12
  13. PeterN

    Savageduck Guest

    Yup! that is one of the big advantages of using the texture as an
    overlay where the blending mode & opacity can be applied to that layer,
    and the effect can be painted in via a layer mask.
     
    Savageduck, Aug 14, 2013
    #13
  14. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    I understand the limitations. That is why I said th texture layer is up
    top. I thought the effects wee interesting, but have to learn how to
    obtain it.
     
    PeterN, Aug 15, 2013
    #14
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