Ping Tony Cooper

Discussion in 'Photography' started by PeterN, May 26, 2013.

  1. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    PeterN, May 26, 2013
    #1
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  2. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Thanks for the link. Pretty basic stuff with a waffle on the one
    controversial aspect: do we ask, or do we snipe? I'm a sniper unless
    the person sees me with the camera up. If there's any indication that
    the person doesn't want to be photographed, I don't.

    I prefer the candid aspect, so I don't want them to know I'm shooting.
     
    Tony Cooper, May 27, 2013
    #2
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  3. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    Yes it is basic.
    Yes I know! We've had this discussion before. I'm starting to come
    around to your POV, on some occasions. However, given our social
    climate, when shooting children, I always ask.

    Yesterday we went to Mohegan Sun, a gambling casino in CT. I was
    carrying my DSLR, since most casinos do not allow photography, I kept
    the lens cap on. As we were leaving I asked abut areas where photography
    was permitted. They said anywhere but the casino floor, and no video. I
    was also told that it was OK to shoot the inside of the casino from
    outside the floor itself. (the floor is easily visible.) I should have
    asked earlier, as we would have missed the ferry ha we stayed later. "I
    shall return." However, I did have a nice time playing poker. ;-)
     
    PeterN, May 27, 2013
    #3
  4. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I rarely, very rarely, have a child as the central focus of an image.
    Sometimes children are in the image, but as part of a crowd. There
    have been exceptions, like this one:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/ppjgjdcnncc648x/2009-01-31-4.jpg

    What is difficult is that age group that are teenagers but not adults.
    They are often good photographic subjects.
     
    Tony Cooper, May 27, 2013
    #4
  5. PeterN

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On Mon, 27 May 2013 10:03:38 -0400, PeterN
    :
    : >On 5/26/2013 7:17 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
    : >> On Sat, 25 May 2013 23:10:46 -0400, PeterN
    : >>
    : >>>
    : >>> thought you might be interested in this discussion. If a pop up appears,
    : >>> just click it off asd it will not appear again. Although is is a
    : >>> commercial site, the folks who run it seem to be ethical.
    : >>>
    : >>> <http://www.picturecorrect.com/tips/street-or-candid-photography-tips/>
    : >>
    : >> Thanks for the link. Pretty basic stuff with a waffle on the one
    : >> controversial aspect: do we ask, or do we snipe? I'm a sniper unless
    : >> the person sees me with the camera up. If there's any indication that
    : >> the person doesn't want to be photographed, I don't.
    : >>
    : >
    : >Yes it is basic.
    : >
    : >> I prefer the candid aspect, so I don't want them to know I'm shooting.
    : >> \\
    : >
    : >Yes I know! We've had this discussion before. I'm starting to come
    : >around to your POV, on some occasions. However, given our social
    : >climate, when shooting children, I always ask.
    :
    : I rarely, very rarely, have a child as the central focus of an image.
    : Sometimes children are in the image, but as part of a crowd. There
    : have been exceptions, like this one:
    :
    : https://www.dropbox.com/s/ppjgjdcnncc648x/2009-01-31-4.jpg

    That little girl, if she grows tall enough, will someday be a defensive
    standout in the WNBA!

    : What is difficult is that age group that are teenagers but not adults.
    : They are often good photographic subjects.

    On a picture that good, I'm being an asshole to carp. But alas, it's my
    nature, so:

    1) The girl is too close to the left edge. So I'd try to compensate by
    cropping from the right, maintaining the same aspect ratio, until the right
    edge is just short of the shadow.

    2) I understand that fill flash would distract the kids and possibly wash out
    the shadows. But you're a Photoshop expert; can't you brighten the girl's face
    enough to give a better look at her eyes?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 1, 2013
    #5
  6. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I can, but I don't think it works all that well. I lightened the face
    and hands, but the real problem is shooting with the sun behind them.
    Not a shot that can be arranged, though. Like a lot of my stuff, it's
    a grab shot.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/06pi16lbqxkgp32/2009-01-31-4B.jpg
     
    Tony Cooper, Jun 1, 2013
    #6
  7. PeterN

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : >On Mon, 27 May 2013 13:21:35 -0400, Tony Cooper <>
    : >wrote:
    : >: On Mon, 27 May 2013 10:03:38 -0400, PeterN
    : >:
    : >: >On 5/26/2013 7:17 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
    : >: >> On Sat, 25 May 2013 23:10:46 -0400, PeterN
    : >: >>
    : >: >>>
    : >: >>> thought you might be interested in this discussion. If a pop up appears,
    : >: >>> just click it off asd it will not appear again. Although is is a
    : >: >>> commercial site, the folks who run it seem to be ethical.
    : >: >>>
    : >: >>> <http://www.picturecorrect.com/tips/street-or-candid-photography-tips/>
    : >: >>
    : >: >> Thanks for the link. Pretty basic stuff with a waffle on the one
    : >: >> controversial aspect: do we ask, or do we snipe? I'm a sniper unless
    : >: >> the person sees me with the camera up. If there's any indication that
    : >: >> the person doesn't want to be photographed, I don't.
    : >: >>
    : >: >
    : >: >Yes it is basic.
    : >: >
    : >: >> I prefer the candid aspect, so I don't want them to know I'm shooting.
    : >: >> \\
    : >: >
    : >: >Yes I know! We've had this discussion before. I'm starting to come
    : >: >around to your POV, on some occasions. However, given our social
    : >: >climate, when shooting children, I always ask.
    : >:
    : >: I rarely, very rarely, have a child as the central focus of an image.
    : >: Sometimes children are in the image, but as part of a crowd. There
    : >: have been exceptions, like this one:
    : >:
    : >: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ppjgjdcnncc648x/2009-01-31-4.jpg
    : >
    : >That little girl, if she grows tall enough, will someday be a defensive
    : >standout in the WNBA!
    : >
    : >: What is difficult is that age group that are teenagers but not adults.
    : >: They are often good photographic subjects.
    : >
    : >On a picture that good, I'm being an asshole to carp. But alas, it's my
    : >nature, so:
    : >
    : >1) The girl is too close to the left edge. So I'd try to compensate by
    : >cropping from the right, maintaining the same aspect ratio, until the right
    : >edge is just short of the shadow.
    : >
    : >2) I understand that fill flash would distract the kids and possibly wash out
    : >the shadows. But you're a Photoshop expert; can't you brighten the girl's face
    : >enough to give a better look at her eyes?
    : >
    : I can, but I don't think it works all that well. I lightened the face
    : and hands, but the real problem is shooting with the sun behind them.
    : Not a shot that can be arranged, though. Like a lot of my stuff, it's
    : a grab shot.
    :
    : https://www.dropbox.com/s/06pi16lbqxkgp32/2009-01-31-4B.jpg

    Maybe if you brightened it half as much. The idea is to get a better look at
    those eyes glaring up at her brother.

    But yeah, obviously with a lucky grabshot, you take what fate gives you.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 1, 2013
    #7
  8. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    If you like glaring eyes:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/1smtz91ptg13pho/B-Mono-Leonardo.jpg
     
    Tony Cooper, Jun 1, 2013
    #8
  9. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    I like the original. Her lightened face seems artificial. I lke being
    able to apply my imagination and seeing her intensity. Similarly the
    body language of the young boy, her brother, shows love. The original is
    a winner.
     
    PeterN, Jun 1, 2013
    #9
  10. <snip>

    It's a marvellous picture.

    I'm just trying out a few portraits (candid - I think that's better, and
    from a distance).

    Bob's advice for bird pictures was spot on: the photos are sharp.

    For portraits: face recognition? auto? etc? I don't yet know enough
    about it to use manual settings.
     
    PAUL {HAMILTON} ROONEY, Jun 3, 2013
    #10
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