Please Help! Popular Negative / Slide / Print sizes

Discussion in 'UK Photography' started by Moldy, Feb 6, 2004.

  1. Moldy

    Moldy Guest

    All,

    Hoping you can help me out... I am building a little application to
    help calculate Scan -> Print resolutions and want to set up some
    presets so can you fill in any blanks from the list below:

    *Negative / Slide*

    35 mm = 36mm x 24mm
    120 = ?? x ??
    5 x 4
    10 x 8
    Any other common sizes?

    *Prints*

    2.8 x 2.1
    5 x 3.5
    6 x 4
    7 x 5
    9 x 6
    10 x 8
    12 x 8
    15 x 10
    30 x 20
    Any other common sizes?

    TIA

    --


    Moldy

    "Then you have the low-carb dieters. This involves the active avoidance of
    life-giving antioxidants while scarfing massive amounts of known carcinogens
    until someone punches you to death for bragging about how much weight you
    lost." - Scott Adams
     
    Moldy, Feb 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. Yes. Do bear in mind though that if you scan mounted slides the frame
    will occupy some of the image area, probably up to 1mm all round (though
    this varies - the metal mask GePe ones occupy a little more than the
    plain plastic GePe ones, for example).
    There are at least 5 different nominal formats used on 120 film: 6x4.5,
    6x6, 6x7, 6x8 and 6x9. (There is also at least one 6x12 back for use on
    large format cameras, and some panoramic cameras in 6x17). All these
    sizes are of course in cm.

    To make matters worse, these are only *nominal* sizes; unfortunately the
    exact size of each varies slightly according to manufacturer. For
    example, one make of 6x7 might be 56mm by 66mm, another 57 by 65mm. You
    will have to check on an actual frame from the camera you intend to use
    if you require this degree of precision.

    You will probably get better details of this on
    rec.photo.equipment.medium-format
    Note these are the nominal film sizes (in inches this time, of course).
    5x4 film actually measures 125x99mm (I just measured a piece to check).
    The actual image size varies according to the design of the film holder
    used; the one I looked at is 120.5x95.5mm, but with some slight
    intrusions at the corners.

    Sorry, I don't have any 10x8 film to check.
    Possibly APS - never used it, horrible idea.
    I rarely use trade-processed prints so I can't comment on the smaller
    sizes. However, the larger sizes look slightly wrong. The old standard
    range in the UK went 10x8, 10x12 (or 9.5x12), 12x16, 16x20 and 20x24,
    with slight variations between manufacturers. In recent years there has
    also been a trend for manufacturers to include A4 in the range, which
    suits the aspect ratio of 35mm film much better. (IMO the "traditional"
    sizes are mostly too square and the A4/35mm shape is too elongated -
    12x16 is the closest to my idea of the ideal.)

    In the USA, 12x16 is almost unknown; 11x14 is common there but virtually
    unknown in the UK.
     
    David Littlewood, Feb 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. Moldy

    richard Guest

    Just one suggestion - while A4 / A3 aren't standard print sizes from
    conventional photography they're a frequent digital print size and so it
    would be handy to have those calculated as well (I know 8x10 is nearly
    A4 but...)




    --
     
    richard, Feb 6, 2004
    #3
  4. Moldy

    Shez Guest

    In the faraway land of uk.rec.photo.misc, Moldy <[email protected]
    t.real.com.foo> said:
    This depends on the camera - I think 6x6 cm is the most common but 6x7
    and 6x9 are also found (I have an old 6x9, it gives 8 pictures to a
    roll).
    Sub-35mm formats like APS, though I can't recall the dimensions.
    I assume the above are in inches. I would add 16x12"/40x30cm (common
    photo paper size), 18x12" (full frame size offered by many labs),
    24x16"/60x40cm (mini-poster offered by many labs).
    Also A2, A3, A4, A5, A6. In particular people running off prints from
    their computer are most likely to be using A4 or in some cases A3.

    -Shez.
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    Shez, Feb 6, 2004
    #4
  5. Moldy

    Mike Finley Guest

    as are 6x4.5, 6x8, 6x12 and 6x17.
    All of these sizes are nominal only and the actual sizes differ
    significantly (and vary from manufacturer to manufacturer for the same
    nominal format). As an example, 6x6 is usually something like 5.6x5.6
    cm

    Mike Finley, http://www.efikim.co.uk
    Mike Finley, http://www.efikim.co.uk
     
    Mike Finley, Feb 6, 2004
    #5
  6. Moldy

    Moldy Guest

    Am going to include these but I know the sizes so didn't post, but
    thanks anyway :)


    --


    Moldy

    "Then you have the low-carb dieters. This involves the active avoidance of
    life-giving antioxidants while scarfing massive amounts of known carcinogens
    until someone punches you to death for bragging about how much weight you
    lost." - Scott Adams
     
    Moldy, Feb 9, 2004
    #6
  7. Moldy

    Moldy Guest

    On Fri, 06 Feb 2004 17:37:19 +0000, Moldy

    Thanks for all responses!


    --


    Moldy

    "Then you have the low-carb dieters. This involves the active avoidance of
    life-giving antioxidants while scarfing massive amounts of known carcinogens
    until someone punches you to death for bragging about how much weight you
    lost." - Scott Adams
     
    Moldy, Feb 9, 2004
    #7
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