Please help with DVD production

Discussion in 'Video Cameras' started by roger eroom, Aug 8, 2004.

  1. roger eroom

    roger eroom Guest

    Hi you all,

    I have a Sony DCR-HC14E dv camera and I would like to make DVD's from the dv
    recordings. I'm preparing to build the following pc budget system for DV
    capture:

    case: AOpen QF 50C (Windowed)

    motherboard: GA-7VM400AMF

    Athlon XP 2500+ (AMD Processor
    in a Box (PIB))

    Kingston 512 MB DDR 184 Pins PC2700
    - KVR333X64C25/512 = CL 2,5

    Seagate Barracuda ST3160023AS
    7200.7 160Gb 7200rpm 8Mb cache S-ATA (maybe adding one more seagate in raid
    config).

    NEC ND2510A White 8x DVD
    Double Layer bulk 8.5GB

    My questions are:
    1. Is the system good enough in terms of processing power so as not to loose
    quality when doing the Mpeg2 encoding?
    2. Is it necessary to buy a special card for capture or is the motherboard
    build in firewire good enough for capture?
    3. What kind of video editing software will work with the build in firewire
    and with this particular Sony DCR-HC14E camera?
    4. Would the quality of the movie on DVD be the same as the quality I've
    seen when connecting the camcorder directly to the TV?

    Thank you very much for your time.

    Roger
     
    roger eroom, Aug 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. All systems give the same quality. More powerful systems do it
    quicker.
    No reason it shouldn't be. It's a utility function.
     
    Laurence Payne, Aug 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. Re the last 2 bits

    Windows XP has a built in programme called "movie maker" which will work
    with the firewire card to capture your footage in DV format. I would steer
    clear though, as it will only capture to "type 1" DV avi file, and most
    editors use "type 2", so i'd use a different capture tool

    http://www.videohelp.com/tools?s=33 has a list of 13 such tools, and DVIO
    has given me good results

    The DV avi file will be very large - about 13 gigs per hour, and if you view
    this on your PC the quality will be very good (don't view it using windows
    media player as it will look awful!), but you will need to encode it to
    mpeg2 before it will be usable for DVD authoring purposes, and this will
    probably be almost as good as the original DV as long as you use the right
    bitrate settings.

    http://www.videohelp.com/guides will have a good selection of guides on the
    whole subject and are worth reading.
     
    Adrian Boliston, Aug 8, 2004
    #3
  4. roger eroom

    Guest Guest

    Did you have any particular operating system in mind?

    PeterS

    Remove my PANTS to reply.
     
    Guest, Aug 8, 2004
    #4
  5. I've only got MM1 on my system, but I was going by this site

    http://users.tpg.com.au/mtam/guide_wmm2.htm to quote:

    "A further complication, however, is that Windows Movie Maker 2 only outputs
    DV Type-1 files which cannot be handled properly by VirtualDub (or any other
    VFW application). This further makes it necessary to first convert the clip
    to DV Type-2 which can be opened and processed properly by VirtualDub."
     
    Adrian Boliston, Aug 8, 2004
    #5
  6. I have tried a number of video editing packages and have been most happy
    with Ulead VideoStudio. An inexpensive route to the currrent version (8.0)
    would be to get hold of an old version and upgrade. My local PC World has
    VideoStudio 6 on sale for £2.99 and the upgrade is about £25.

    VideoStudio produces great results and is suitable for both the beginner and
    the more advanced user who wants to tweak the settings.

    Raymond
     
    Raymond Dalgleish, Aug 9, 2004
    #6
  7. roger eroom

    Jukka Aho Guest

    You seem to be confusing "Type 1" and "Type 2" AVI files with
    "standard" and "OpenDML 1.2" AVI files.

    There are two flavours of AVI:

    1) The traditional kind of an AVI file: limited to 2 GB
    in size

    and

    2) The newer "OpenDML 1.2" style AVI: an extended version
    of the above, structured in multiple 2 GB chunks (of
    which only the first one can be read by old, non-OpenDML
    1.2 aware programs). Video clips saved in this updated
    version of the AVI format can be huge; I do not even know
    what the maximum theoretical file size limit is for an
    OpenDML 1.2 AVI.

    * * *

    In addition to these two flavours of the AVI format itself,
    there are also two different ways to store DV data inside
    an AVI file:

    "Type 1" = DV data wrapped inside an AVI file on a single
    video track - i.e. with no separate audio track. (The sound
    is left "as is" in its native form - interleaved with the
    video within the DV stream structure.) You need to access
    these kind of files through the Directshow API, as the
    older VfW API does not support demultiplexing the audio
    from within the video track.

    "Type 2" = As above, but with an additional copy of the
    original DV audio stream on a separate AVI PCM audio
    track. These files can be read and modified by programs
    which use the older VfW API. Even though the original DV
    audio data is still present (on the video track), the
    separate PCM audio track takes precedence over it.

    * * *

    Now, you can have

    1) A "traditional" AVI (with the 2 GB limit), containing
    "Type 1" DV data (single track, embedded audio, can only
    be accessed using the Directshow API.)

    2) An OpenDML 1.2 AVI (with _no_ 2 GB limit), containing
    "Type 1" DV data (single track, embedded audio, can only
    be accessed using the Directshow API.)

    3) A "traditional" AVI (with the 2 GB limit), containing
    "Type 2" DV data (two tracks, one of which contains
    the DV data [with the embedded audio], and another one,
    which is a separate copy of the audio on a PCM track,
    making the file readable through the older VfW API.)

    4) An OpenDML 1.2 AVI (with _no_ 2 GB limit), containing
    "Type 2" DV data (two tracks, one of which contains
    the DV data [with the embedded audio], and another one,
    which is a separate copy of the audio on a PCM track,
    making the file readable through the older VfW API.)

    * * *

    Incidentally, I am processing a 10 GB "Type 2" DV AVI
    file in VirtualDub [1] on the background right now as
    I write this message.

    [1] VirtualDub only uses the old VfW API (which makes
    accessing "Type 1" single track DV AVI files impossible),
    but supports the newer OpenDML 1.2 AVI format (which
    allows accessing AVI files which are larger in size
    than 2 GB.)
     
    Jukka Aho, Aug 10, 2004
    #7
  8. roger eroom

    Jukka Aho Guest

    Microsoft uses the terms "AVI Type 1" and "AVI Type 2", but
    these terms only refer to the track structure inside the
    file - in other words, whether the DV data is accompanied
    by a separate audio track or not.

    More information can be found here

    <http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/directshow/htm/
    type1vstype2dvfiles.asp>

    and here

    <http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/directshow/htm/
    dvdataintheavifileformat.asp>

    The terms "AVI Type 1" and "AVI Type 2", however, do not
    refer to file size restrictions, which are a separate issue.

    Microsoft calls OpenDML AVI files (which lift the 2 GB
    restriction) "AVI 2.0" (note: not "Type 2"), which is
    probably the source of your confusion.

    See

    <http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/wcedshow/html/_dx
    ce_dshow_avi_20_file_format_extensions.asp>
     
    Jukka Aho, Aug 10, 2004
    #8
  9. roger eroom

    :::Jerry:::: Guest

    It is not the first time Mr Morgan has done this sort of thing, I sometimes
    wonder if he does so to cause confusion or because he simply doesn't bother
    to read (and understand) the message / thread he is responding to...
     
    :::Jerry::::, Aug 18, 2004
    #9
  10. roger eroom

    :::Jerry:::: Guest

    Here we go again, Mr Morgan won't accept that HE is the person who is
    wrong...

    This is the 3rd message in this thread, before Mr Morgan first reply to the
    thread - note the lines above my added cross hatching were mention of DV avi
    files were mentioned.

    <quote>
    Path: uni-berlin.de!not-for-mail
    From: "Adrian Boliston" <>
    Newsgroups: uk.rec.video.digital
    Subject: Re: Please help with DVD production
    Date: Sun, 8 Aug 2004 19:14:37 +0100
    Lines: 31
    Message-ID: <>
    References: <41164c4b$0$229$>
    <>
    X-Trace: news.uni-berlin.de
    uJ6rxYqum0Q6zkkuweVnPwfZiN59WRz+yXi3bFsFCcTLA1DkF6
    X-Priority: 3
    X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
    X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2800.1437
    X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2800.1441
    Xref: uni-berlin.de uk.rec.video.digital:34458


    Re the last 2 bits

    Windows XP has a built in programme called "movie maker" which will work
    with the firewire card to capture your footage in DV format. I would steer
    clear though, as it will only capture to "type 1" DV avi file, and most

    ###############

    editors use "type 2", so i'd use a different capture tool

    http://www.videohelp.com/tools?s=33 has a list of 13 such tools, and DVIO
    has given me good results

    The DV avi file will be very large - about 13 gigs per hour, and if you view

    #################

    this on your PC the quality will be very good (don't view it using windows
    media player as it will look awful!), but you will need to encode it to
    mpeg2 before it will be usable for DVD authoring purposes, and this will
    probably be almost as good as the original DV as long as you use the right
    bitrate settings.

    http://www.videohelp.com/guides will have a good selection of guides on the
    whole subject and are worth reading.
    </quote>

    Why does Mr (two planks) Morgan always dig himself into a hole ? :~(
     
    :::Jerry::::, Aug 18, 2004
    #10
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