Please recommend a good photo store in New York

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by washy, Apr 1, 2004.

  1. washy

    washy Guest

    Hi

    I am in New York next week for the first time and I am trying to find
    a store that sells pro kit.

    The problem is that the ones I have found are all closed for that week
    for "passover"

    does anyone know of any other stores that might be open


    I am buying canon f2.8 70-200mm IS zoom

    please help or I might have to come away empty handed

    john
     
    washy, Apr 1, 2004
    #1
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  2. washy

    Gregg Guest

    Bad timing for the good Pro stores in NYC
     
    Gregg, Apr 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. There is a real advantage to your "coming away empty handed". If you order
    from these stores by mail order from any other state, you will not have to
    pay the New York sales taxes, which are running close to 10% now. So what
    you want to do is inspect the outfit that you are interested in somewhere
    else. (anywhere else) and then order it from the New York stores (I
    recommend Adorama, or B&H) by phone from your home state....Even if your
    home state also has high sales taxes, the New York stores will not have to
    charge you the taxes if they send the outfit outside New York.
     
    William Graham, Apr 1, 2004
    #3
  4. washy

    PCportinc Guest

    if you order items shipped to your state, you pay s/h, so you dont save
    anything.
    Since you've never been to NYC before I assume you live far away. So bud, do
    yourself a favor and buy local as you wont run back to NYC if there is a
    problem.

    Besides J&R across the street from ground zero I cant recommend anything else
    at this time.
     
    PCportinc, Apr 2, 2004
    #4
  5. Depends on what you buy.....S & H on a 5 pound box that contains several
    hundred dollars worth of camera equipment is only a few dollars, and sales
    taxes could be close to $50......
    How would you know? - I was born and raised in NYC. I left when I was 17 in
    1952.

    So bud, do
    I put any, "problems" back in the box, and ship them back to NYC......Is
    that any harder than returning them to a local store? - I don't think
    so......
     
    William Graham, Apr 2, 2004
    #5
  6. washy

    Joe Pucillo Guest

    Wasn't it William Graham who said...
    Ah, yes: some people know the price of everything, but the cost
    of nothing.

    How long do you think your local camera store will remain in
    business if it's just operating as a 'showroom' for mail order
    houses?

    Yeah, I buy a lot from B&H and Adorama, but I don't waste the
    time of the local store if I'm not prepared to make my purchase
    there. Many times, knowing the price in NYC is good leverage in
    ratcheting the price down a notch, but I still let them have the
    sale.

    And another thing: even though you don't have to pay sales tax on
    your purchase in NYC, most states have a use tax that must be
    paid on out-of-state purchases.

    Just because you don't know anyone who actually pays the use tax
    doesn't mean it's not against the law not to.
     
    Joe Pucillo, Apr 2, 2004
    #6
  7. I am in New York next week for the first time and I am trying to find
    If you have access to a car, Unique Photo in Florham Park, New Jersey is a
    reasonable possibility. Otherwise, you might try Calumet Photo in New York.
     
    Andrew Koenig, Apr 2, 2004
    #7
  8. washy

    PCportinc Guest

    Since you've never been to NYC before I assume you live far away.
    ok, welcome back after 52 years.
    what took you so long to return?
     
    PCportinc, Apr 2, 2004
    #8
  9. I see nothing wrong with the following scenario:
    You go to NYC, to one of the big stores that you like, such as B&H, or
    Adorama. You look at the equipment in which you are interested, and try it
    out in the store, using the salesman's time. Then, if you decide to buy, you
    ask the salesman for his telephone number and extension. Then you step
    aside, and telephone him from your cell phone, which you happen to have with
    you. You order the exact same outfit from him by telephone, charge it to
    your credit card, and have him ship it directly to your residence in
    whatever other state in which you live. Since you aren't leaving the store
    with the goods in hand, he will not have to charge you the sales tax. For
    all anyone could possible know, you could have ordered the stuff from your
    own living room in California. (or wherever)
    Someone else made the objection that if there is something wrong with
    the outfit, you would have to send it back for repair/replacement, but that
    would be true whether you paid the sales taxes of not. The chances are you
    won't know about the defect until you are home in California looking at the
    pictures anyway, so what's the difference? - Unless, of course, you are a
    crazed liberal who insists on paying the state government all the taxes you
    can possibly pay, just because, "They are there".
     
    William Graham, Apr 3, 2004
    #9
  10. I'm not the one who is coming back to buy from a NY store....I do buy from
    these stores, but I do it by mail order. It is cheaper for me to do this
    even though the state in which I live, (Oregon) has no sales taxes. No store
    here can beat the NYC camera stores.....exactly why, I don't know. I just
    know that, although I do give my local store owner the chance to come close
    to the NYC store prices, I usually end up buying big ticket items from B&H
    or Adorama. About 25 years ago I had a Japanese friend in the San Francisco
    bay area who was going back to Japan to visit his parents, and he asked me
    if there was anything he could get for me. I gave him a copy of Pop
    Photography to take with him, and told him that if he could significantly
    beat the price on a couple of items, he should buy them for me. (I forget
    now, just what they were) He came back empty handed a month later, and told
    me that the NYC stores were underselling even the Japanese camera stores. He
    would have had to pay more for the items in Japan than we could get them for
    here! And that was not counting any import/export duties that we might have
    had to pay, either......So, go figure.......
     
    William Graham, Apr 3, 2004
    #10
  11. Yes, it's against the law. The constitutionality of the law is extremely
    doubtful, however. The principle involved here is that under the U.S.
    Constitution no state has the right to tax commerce in some other state,
    which is what they are doing when they demand you pay a sales and use tax on
    something purchased elsewhere. I don't know that anyone has ever tried to
    challenge the law on constitutional grounds, though. Probably because most
    individuals would much rather just pay the tax than go to the enormous
    expense of challenging it in the courts.

    One problem with that is that if you happen to live in a nearby state which
    has a tax-information-sharing agreement with New York (as I do), you are
    likely to get nailed eventually for your state's sales and use tax anyway
    (as I have). Then you get to pay the tax, interest on the tax, and a
    penalty. This happened to me with a couple of relatively big-ticket items I
    bought from B&H several years ago. It does not seem to happen with less
    expensive items, as I had made many, many purchases from B&H over the
    previous 20+ years and had never been tagged in this way.

    The two items on which they caught me had been separate purchases, made two
    or three years before. That's nasty.

    I don't know how exactly this works. I have made a higher cost purchase from
    Cameta (which is way out on Long Island) and never got nailed for it. So it
    may be a problem that arises only with stores in the city, or with very
    large stores. Or it may be just a spin of the wheel kind of thing. In any
    case it largely stopped me from buying from New York. I still do
    occasionally buy from Adorama or Focus, but not big-ticket items, and I put
    down enough on my state income tax return (which is how my state's sales and
    use tax is paid) to cover it just in case.

    Now quite a lot of brand-new 35mm stuff is sold on eBay at very attractive
    prices, and sometimes Camera World of Oregon has very good prices. There is
    less reason to buy from New York than there used to be.

    Liberals generally want OTHER people to pay all those taxes, though. It is
    OTHER people (and of course those big, nasty, greedy corporations) that are
    never paying enough in taxes. This is known as the Arianna Huffington
    Principle.

    Neil
     
    Neil Harrington, Apr 3, 2004
    #11
  12. washy

    BandHPhoto Guest

    <You go to NYC, to one of the big stores that you like, such as B&H, ... You
    look at the equipment in which you are interested, and try it out in the store,
    using the salesman's time. Then, if you decide to buy, you ask the salesman for
    his telephone number and extension. Then you step aside, and telephone him from
    your cell phone, which you happen to have with
    you. You order the exact same outfit from him by telephone, charge it to your
    credit card, and have him ship it directly to your residence in whatever other
    state in which you live.>

    Why go through all that bother? While talking to the sales guy just tell him
    you want the stuff shipped. He can do 90% of the transaction right from his
    screen. Then all you have to do is sign the credit card chit at the cashier's
    station and be on your merry way.

    BTW, for the fellow looking for a store during Passover, I used to shop in Lens
    & Repro often. Not the widest selection, but I was always satisfied.
    - --

    regards,
    Henry Posner/B&H Photo-Video
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com
     
    BandHPhoto, Apr 3, 2004
    #12
  13. There you go.....It should be that simple....And, furthermore, this should
    tell you something....That the very notion of sales taxes is illogical,
    discriminatory, and (should be) unconstitutional. It discriminates against
    the stores in your state, and you have been taxed on the money at least once
    already, and it forces a non-government organization to collect taxes for
    the government.....All of these things are, or at least ought to be,
    illegal.
     
    William Graham, Apr 4, 2004
    #13
  14. Well, I am astounded that New York would get your home state to collect
    sales taxes for them. When I was living in California (about 8 years ago) I
    could buy anything from out of state and not have to pay any sales taxes,
    unless the store also had branches in California......I used to buy bicycle
    parts from Performance, (for example) and since their only store was in the
    midwest somewhere, I didn't have to pay any sales taxes. Then, when they
    opened a store in Los Angeles, they had to charge all shipments to anywhere
    in California the California sales taxes, so I stopped dealing with them. I
    don't know how some other state would find out that you bought something
    from one of the New York stores, unless that store sent each state
    governments tax collector a list of all the shipments they made out of state
    during the fiscial year, and any store that did that to me would lose my
    business immediately. I think a law like that is unconstitutional, and will
    remain so unless we adopt a federal sales tax.To me, sales taxes are
    unconstitutional anyway, since you have already been taxed on the money when
    you pay your income tax. Then, after you pay state and federal taxes on your
    income, when you take what you have left over to the store to spend it, they
    tax you again.....Unless double taxation has been deemed in keeping with the
    constitution, I would call this unconstitutional. But so many of the
    constitutional protections that I have enjoyed all of my life have been
    trashed, that I just can't tell anymore what is, and what is not.......In
    their crazed desire to get as much money as possible for their robin hood
    give away programs, the liberals will tax us many times, in many ways for as
    much money as they can. You can kill yourself with candy bars just as easily
    as with booze, but the government taxes the hell out of booze and
    cigarettes, just because it's a habit, and they know that the poor slobs who
    are hooked on the substance will pay and pay as long as they are alive. In
    California, they tax candy bars too........Then they throw up their hands in
    horror at the mob for dealing drugs, when they are the biggest dealers of
    all!
     
    William Graham, Apr 4, 2004
    #14
  15. Perhaps you misunderstood me; it's the other way around. New York shares
    sales information with my state so that my state can collect sales and use
    tax when I buy something from New York.


    I don't know the details on how it works, but SOMEONE collects sales
    information from at least some New York sellers and passes it on to the
    purchasers' state revenue department if both states have this sort of
    reciprocal arrangement. As far as I know it's only states in the general
    region of NY that have this arrangement with NY. I presume B&H is not the
    only NY store from which this information is collected; it's just the only
    one that I got hit with in this way.

    Sure, but until it's successfully challenged it's still there.

    That would be unconstitutional also. Keep in mind that the federal income
    tax originally passed in the late 19th century was unconstitutional and was
    ruled so by the U.S. Supreme Court. That's why it took a constitutional
    amendment (the 16th Amendment, which became effective in 1913) to enable the
    feds to tax income. There were and still are questions about the legality of
    its ratification, but we're stuck with it anyway. Lots of things the federal
    government does are unconstitutional.

    And again and again. If you own equities either directly or through a mutual
    fund, your dividends are taxed as income even though the corporations paying
    them have already paid income tax on the same money. We pay so many taxes
    now, in so many ways, that the average American works about five months of
    the year just to pay taxes. Most people have no conception of how much they
    pay in taxes because many of them are hidden.

    "The art of taxation is the art of plucking the goose without killing it." I
    wish I could remember who said that.


    Undoubtedly they would have much less objection (if any) to those drugs if
    they could only manage to tax them.

    Neil
     
    Neil Harrington, Apr 4, 2004
    #15
  16. I see nothing wrong with the following scenario:
    The only thing wrong is that you're wasting your time -- you can achieve
    exactly the same effect by asking the salesman while you're there to ship
    the merchandise to you, rather than taking it out of the store with you.
     
    Andrew Koenig, Apr 4, 2004
    #16
  17. In Washington state, near the Oregon border, the state government allows tax
    free purchases in the stores, because so many Washington residents have been
    crossing the border into Oregon to do their shopping, and the stores in
    Washington complained that they were being faced with unfair competition
    with the Oregon stores. This is exactly the opposite philosophy with the
    stores in the states close to NYC, where those states stores are "protected"
    by their respective states forcing the NYC buyers to pay taxes anyway......I
    used to be kind of sad that I left NYC, because of the glamour of the big
    city.....But now, I am quite glad I left....I don't think I could stand
    living in that "hotbed of liberalism."
     
    William Graham, Apr 5, 2004
    #17
  18. I would hope that you are correct.....But government laws are frequently
    without logic.....It wouldn't surprise me if you had to step around the
    corner so the salesman couldn't see you and, "know that you were there in
    the city."
     
    William Graham, Apr 5, 2004
    #18
  19. You've sure got that right.

    I was born and raised on Long Island myself, fairly close to the city, and
    used to enjoy going back to NYC after moving to an adjoining state. But I
    haven't been there now for decades, and have no desire ever to return.

    Neil
     
    Neil Harrington, Apr 5, 2004
    #19
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