Pls point me towards a good AVCHD tutorial for Vegas , or Premiere

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by yepthisismyemail, Jul 31, 2008.

  1. Thanks. also if you know of a good free decoder that is not to
    painfully slow that would be appreciated as well.
    thanks,
    ian
     
    yepthisismyemail, Jul 31, 2008
    #1
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  2. Jacques E. Bouchard, Jul 31, 2008
    #2
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  3. yepthisismyemail, Jul 31, 2008
    #3
  4. Thanks I have previously tried a basic google search using AVCHD +
    Vegas... I even searched this group for answers, before posting.!.

    Okay to be more specific how are you suppose to bring these mts files
    into Vegas? Through the capture windoww or are you suppose to e able
    to droop them into the timeline?
     
    yepthisismyemail, Jul 31, 2008
    #4
  5. yepthisismyemail

    Smarty Guest

    Ian,

    Very straight-forward.....

    Go to File--->Import--->Media

    Select .mts file and do an "Open"

    File will show up in Vegas and can be edited, etc.

    I assume you are using the latest Vegas 8 Pro, 8b, Build 217.

    Smarty






    Thanks I have previously tried a basic google search using AVCHD +
    Vegas... I even searched this group for answers, before posting.!.

    Okay to be more specific how are you suppose to bring these mts files
    into Vegas? Through the capture windoww or are you suppose to e able
    to droop them into the timeline?
     
    Smarty, Jul 31, 2008
    #5
  6. A very smart answer Smarty. Strange thing is that is not working. I am
    running it through Parallels because FCP and Imovie both were
    crashing. I am going to try this in bootcamp as well as in FCP and
    Imovie aon a different powermac.
    thanks.
    ian
     
    yepthisismyemail, Aug 1, 2008
    #6
  7. Weird Vegas does not give me the .mts option???
     
    yepthisismyemail, Aug 1, 2008
    #7
  8. yepthisismyemail

    Netmask Guest

    Netmask, Aug 1, 2008
    #8
  9. Smarty,
    Is there a plug in or anything i could be missing as the mts option is
    not there? I do have the latest build....
    ian
     
    yepthisismyemail, Aug 1, 2008
    #9
  10. yepthisismyemail

    Smarty Guest


    No special plug-in or other trick is needed to see and open the .mts files
    on my machine using the standard and most recent version of Vegas 8b Build
    217. I can only suggest you go to the Vegas support web site and ask for
    help there or contact Sony directly in Madison Wisconsin where the Vegas
    people provide support.

    Incidentally, AFAIK, the Powermac (older G4 and G5) Macs do not support
    AVCHD for Apple software and only Intel-based newer Mac CPUs are supported,
    so you may be running into other issues with Bootcamp, OSX, etc.

    Smarty
     
    Smarty, Aug 1, 2008
    #10
  11. I bet it is a parallels issue I will try it with bootcamp today and
    report my findings.
     
    yepthisismyemail, Aug 2, 2008
    #11
  12. yepthisismyemail

    Smarty Guest


    Ian,

    Bootcamp should allow Vegas to run without the extra shell of Parallels and
    its virtualization. Hopefully this will fix your .mts file import problem.

    Smarty
     
    Smarty, Aug 2, 2008
    #12
  13. worked like a charm. Now for finding a comfortable export method.
     
    yepthisismyemail, Aug 3, 2008
    #13
  14. yepthisismyemail

    Smarty Guest

    Excellent Ian!

    Now what are exporting intentions......AVCHD disks, an edited AVCHD file,
    iPod h.264, You Tube, etc.?

    Smarty
     
    Smarty, Aug 3, 2008
    #14
  15. I plan to keep all original AVCHD files on hard disk as a back up.
    These will be on raided disks. Also I plan to export edited projects
    in a lower res/streamable format, as well as one that is pretty close
    to full quality. With the high res exports I will burn dvds and keep
    them on the raided drives. Luckily I bought my camera at Costco. HG10
    for 650$. Plus you have three months to decide if you want to keep it
    or not. If file management gets to out of hand ( say for instance I
    fill up a 500gb drive per month) well I may have to dump the HG 10
    for a HV30.
    Any suggestions are appreciated.
    Ian
     
    yepthisismyemail, Aug 3, 2008
    #15
  16. yepthisismyemail

    Arny Krueger Guest


    The two free ???? -> DV-AVI transcoders that I see mentioned the most often
    are:

    MPEG StreamClip + Quicktime Alternative 1.81

    Super

    I've tried them both and have better luck with MPEG Streamclip.

    The secret to getting either run *fast* involves many cores and gigahertz.
    ;-)
     
    Arny Krueger, Aug 3, 2008
    #16
  17. yepthisismyemail

    Smarty Guest


    I use both HDV and AVCHD, and find that tape still remains a very durable
    archiving strategy which others on this newsgroup and elsewhere also seem to
    prefer. I have relatively little confidence in 'burned' optical media, the
    type we do with lasers, but expect that 'pressed' media such as commercial
    disks will last a very long time unless handled poorly. Even with tape's
    advantage in archiving, I still much prefer to carry, use, and edit the
    AVCHD, since I always strongly prefer light, small, and fast. Small quality
    differences aside, AVCHD has huge advantages in these 3 areas.

    Given the cost of buying 500GB drives versus 500 GB of tape capacity in
    mini-DV tapes, there is now an argument which can be made for the economy of
    disks. If you truly expect to generate 25 hours a month of content, then a
    500GB disk drive would still be economically reasonable even when compared
    to the same capacity of tapes, with tape or disk storage costing about $75
    total.

    Regarding HG versus HV at Costco, the real issue in my own experience is
    whether you have the computer power to handle AVCHD. This is a very big
    issue since most of the complaints and problems I had and others have had
    seem to directly stem from inadequate CPU and RAM. I would hate to do AVCHD
    editing and authoring on a weak machine, and HDV is many times faster if the
    CPU is old or marginal. Once the CPU hurdle has been overcome however, the
    ease of importing an hour of AVCHD into a computer in a few minutes with all
    the clips individually thumb-nailed really allows a much faster workflow.
    People who do real time electronic news gathering or other time-critical
    capture and editing know what I am talking about.

    If I were shopping today, absolutely no doubt I would buy the forthcoming
    HF11 or HG11. The sample video link I posted yesterday makes it clear that
    24 Mbit/sec AVCHD is as sweet as it gets for consumer HD video.

    Sorry for rambling Ian......but hope I may have been some help.


    Smarty
     
    Smarty, Aug 3, 2008
    #17
  18. yepthisismyemail

    Smarty Guest


    I use both HDV and AVCHD, and find that tape still remains a very durable
    archiving strategy which others on this newsgroup and elsewhere also seem to
    prefer. I have relatively little confidence in 'burned' optical media, the
    type we do with lasers, but expect that 'pressed' media such as commercial
    disks will last a very long time unless handled poorly. Even with tape's
    advantage in archiving, I still much prefer to carry, use, and edit the
    AVCHD, since I always strongly prefer light, small, and fast. Small quality
    differences aside, AVCHD has huge advantages in these 3 areas.

    Given the cost of buying 500GB drives versus 500 GB of tape capacity in
    mini-DV tapes, there is now an argument which can be made for the economy of
    disks. If you truly expect to generate 25 hours a month of content, then a
    500GB disk drive would still be economically reasonable even when compared
    to the same capacity of tapes, with tape or disk storage costing about $75
    total.

    Regarding HG versus HV at Costco, the real issue in my own experience is
    whether you have the computer power to handle AVCHD. This is a very big
    issue since most of the complaints and problems I had and others have had
    seem to directly stem from inadequate CPU and RAM. I would hate to do AVCHD
    editing and authoring on a weak machine, and HDV is many times faster if the
    CPU is old or marginal. Once the CPU hurdle has been overcome however, the
    ease of importing an hour of AVCHD into a computer in a few minutes with all
    the clips individually thumb-nailed really allows a much faster workflow.
    People who do real time electronic news gathering or other time-critical
    capture and editing know what I am talking about.

    If I were shopping today, absolutely no doubt I would buy the forthcoming
    HF11 or HG11. The sample video link I posted yesterday makes it clear that
    24 Mbit/sec AVCHD is as sweet as it gets for consumer HD video.

    Sorry for rambling Ian......but hope I may have been some help.


    Smarty
     
    Smarty, Aug 3, 2008
    #18
  19. I think my imac if reloaded would be fine??? Otherwise I have a mac
    pro but I prefer to use it for this. My imac is a 2.ghz machine with 2
    gigs of ram. Video card is 128 or 256. i like Mpeg stream clip but it
    will not decode AVCHD to my knowledge?
     
    yepthisismyemail, Aug 5, 2008
    #19
  20. You were of tremendous help.
    ian
     
    yepthisismyemail, Aug 5, 2008
    #20
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