Point & Shoot maker Ricoh buys PENTAX! The horror!!

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by RichA, Jul 1, 2011.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    RichA, Jul 1, 2011
    #1
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  2. Not as well known as Pentax, but Ricoh has been making cameras for a very
    long time, some of them highly regarded. No need to "pity Pentaxians" on
    this account as far as I can see.

    Companies buy and/or merge with other companies. That's the history of the
    business world.
     
    Neil Harrington, Jul 1, 2011
    #2
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  3. RichA

    Bruce Guest


    This is desperately bad news for Pentax and for Pentax users, and not
    much better news for Ricoh.

    http://www.dpreview.com/news/1107/11070105ricohbuyspentax.asp

    According to this DPReview news item, Ricoh is buying Pentax "for its
    interchangeable lens camera technology, lens technology and sales
    channels." But the "interchangeable lens camera technology" is the
    stupid, stupid, stupid Q Series, the "lens technology" was long ago
    passed to Tokina (which company remains firmly in Hoya Corporation's
    hands) and the Pentax "sales channels" have all but vanished, at least
    here in Europe.

    All Ricoh is getting is some average DSLRs, a handful of lens designs
    left over from 35mm film days, a pathetic range of thoroughly mediocre
    compact P&S digicams and that stupid, stupid, stupid Q Series.

    The Q Series has killed Pentax stone dead. All the hard-won
    credibility of the 645D has been squandered on the joke Q camera with
    its tiny sensor and toy lenses.

    Ricoh made some decent 35mm SLRs in the 70s and 80s and compact P&S
    cameras in the 90s, notably the GR with its superb 28mm lens. But the
    company has seriously lost direction since the arrival of the digital
    revolution, with the huge investment in the GXR "system" producing
    only an unsaleable lemon.

    What we are talking about here is the joining together of two failing
    companies for no reason other than Ricoh thinking that they jointly
    have a better chance of survival than Ricoh has on its own.

    Yet what does Pentax have to replace the GXR lemon? It has another
    lemon - the Q System, a joke product if ever there was one. What does
    Pentax have that would supplant Ricoh's mediocre P&S range? Another
    mediocre P&S range!

    We have seen it all before, when two very weak photo companies (Konica
    and Minolta) merged, with disastrous consequences for both. There was
    no strength in that merger - the merged company merely compounded the
    structural weaknesses of both its constituent partners, as Sony later
    found to its terrible cost.

    The same will be true here. The only question is, who will have
    dragged the other down? The blame game hardly matters, because
    dragged down they will surely be. Both of them.

    The only winner here is Hoya Corporation, whose Tokina brand has
    benefitted greatly from Pentax's presence in the group. Selling a
    Pentax lame duck has to be a good move for Hoya Corporation, but
    everyone else loses.
     
    Bruce, Jul 1, 2011
    #3
  4. RichA

    Bruce Guest

    Bruce, Jul 1, 2011
    #4
  5. RichA

    Mike Guest

    Ricoh has made cameras since 1936.

    Ricoh was a SLR maker for eons, they used the M42 (Practika/Pentax
    screwmount, and in the mid-1970's switched to the Pentax K-Mount. They
    were an OEM maker of some of the Sears cameras.

    http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Ricoh


    Mike
     
    Mike, Jul 1, 2011
    #5
  6. RichA

    Rich Guest

    I like the post on Dpreview where the guy grafted the kit lens to the
    front of a photocopier!
     
    Rich, Jul 2, 2011
    #6
  7. RichA

    Rich Guest

    Second-tier maker. Pentax, Nikon, Canon, Minolta and Olympus were the
    most well-known in the SLR days. Ricoh, Mamiya, Fuji, Konica, etc.,
    brought up the rear.
     
    Rich, Jul 2, 2011
    #7
  8. They were the "Big Five," yes. But there were excellent SLRs made by several
    others.
    And some of those "etc."s made very nice cameras. My first really good SLR
    (with TTL metering) was a Yashica.

    The great beauty of the M42 screw mount was that you could keep and add to
    your collection of lenses while changing between several different brands of
    camera. I had a Petri, two or three Yashicas, a couple of Prakticas, a
    couple of Mamiya Sekors, and finally three Fujicas over the years. The last
    Fujicas weren't as universally compatible with respect to lenses because
    they had a *locking* screw mount, which was almost a design contradiction.
    But all the others were happy with any M42 lens.
     
    Neil Harrington, Jul 2, 2011
    #8
  9. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : > On 01/07/2011 12:43 PM, RichA wrote:
    : >> I pity Pentaxians. But Ricoh as a company has acquired more than a
    : >> few other companies over the last 10 years to boost its position in
    : >> various markets. I wouldn't worry about a name change, Pentax is the
    : >> name they want, Ricoh isn't well-known as a camera maker.
    : >>
    : >> http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1036&message=38795593
    : >>
    : > Ricoh has made cameras since 1936.
    : >
    : > Ricoh was a SLR maker for eons, they used the M42 (Practika/Pentax
    : > screwmount, and in the mid-1970's switched to the Pentax K-Mount. They
    : > were an OEM maker of some of the Sears cameras.
    : >
    : > http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Ricoh
    : >
    : >
    : > Mike
    : >
    : >
    : >
    :
    : Second-tier maker. Pentax, Nikon, Canon, Minolta and Olympus were the
    : most well-known in the SLR days. Ricoh, Mamiya, Fuji, Konica, etc.,
    : brought up the rear.

    How did Miranda fit into the mix? I remember them as being pretty well known
    (they advertised a lot), although I don't recall ever meeting anyone who owned
    one. I think they claimed to have been the first with some interesting
    feature, but I can't remember what it was. (Yeah, I know; I should Google them
    if I really cared.)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jul 2, 2011
    #9
  10. RichA

    Neil Ellwood Guest

    I had a Miranda D and it was brilliant. Interchangeable viewfinder
    (pentaprism, chest level viewfinder and a magnifying viewfinder), Both
    vertical and horizantal shutter releases. f2.8 50mm Miranda preset lens
    of very good quality. The build quality was reasonable considering the
    price of the camera although it wasn't up to Leica standards. The image
    was the brightest I have seen - even better than the Olympus OM30 I had
    quite a few years later.
     
    Neil Ellwood, Jul 2, 2011
    #10
  11. RichA

    Neil Ellwood Guest

    A lot of people referred to the M42 mount as the Pentax screw but
    originally it was the Edixa screw even though they didn't originate it.
     
    Neil Ellwood, Jul 2, 2011
    #11
  12. RichA

    Allen Guest

    I owned a Miranda F--the best camera I could afford at the time. It was
    a great camera--all sorts of features that other cameras lacked at the
    time. And the 50mm lens that came with it was needle sharp, as was a
    135mm that I acquired later. Its only weakness was its downfall--shoddy
    construction. It eventually just fell apart--literally.
    Allen
     
    Allen, Jul 2, 2011
    #12
  13. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    I was a fine camera that was put out of business because of a terrible,
    but faulty review in Consumer Reports.
     
    PeterN, Jul 2, 2011
    #13
  14. "Praktica-Pentax mount" was a common term for it, though neither Praktica
    nor Pentax originated it. I don't know when Edixa first adopted it.

    It has long been claimed that the M42 mount originated with the Contax S,
    which was also said to be the first SLR with a pentaprism.
     
    Neil Harrington, Jul 2, 2011
    #14
  15. I knew one fellow who owned a Miranda, I think in the late '60s. When we
    discussed our cameras he asked me, "Why didn't you get a Miranda?" -- as if
    that was so obviously the only camera to buy.

    I think Miranda had an unusual dual mount, both screw and bayonet. But the
    screw wasn't the ubiquitous M42. I ordered an M42 lens from a NYC dealer and
    it wouldn't fit my cameras because it was for the Miranda screw mount
    instead. I sold it to the guy with the Miranda.

    Mirandas were imported by Allied Impex, with Soligor lenses. Allied Impex
    also imported Soligor lenses for most other cameras at that time. I think
    they just owned the name "Soligor," i.e. it was a brand name like "Vivitar,"
    not necessarily a specific manufacturer.
     
    Neil Harrington, Jul 2, 2011
    #15
  16. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : Neil Ellwood wrote:
    : > On Fri, 01 Jul 2011 21:41:19 -0400, Neil Harrington wrote:
    : >
    : >> Rich wrote:
    : >>> : >>>
    : >>>> On 01/07/2011 12:43 PM, RichA wrote:
    : >>>>> I pity Pentaxians. But Ricoh as a company has acquired more than
    : >>>>> a few other companies over the last 10 years to boost its
    : >>>>> position in various markets. I wouldn't worry about a name
    : >>>>> change, Pentax is the name they want, Ricoh isn't well-known as a
    : >>>>> camera maker.
    : >>>>>
    : >>>>> http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?
    : >>>>> forum=1036&message=38795593
    : >>>>>
    : >>>> Ricoh has made cameras since 1936.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Ricoh was a SLR maker for eons, they used the M42 (Practika/Pentax
    : >>>> screwmount, and in the mid-1970's switched to the Pentax K-Mount.
    : >>>> They were an OEM maker of some of the Sears cameras.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Ricoh
    : >>>>
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Mike
    : >>>>
    : >>>>
    : >>>>
    : >>>>
    : >>> Second-tier maker. Pentax, Nikon, Canon, Minolta and Olympus were
    : >>> the most well-known in the SLR days.
    : >>
    : >> They were the "Big Five," yes. But there were excellent SLRs made by
    : >> several others.
    : >>
    : >>> Ricoh, Mamiya, Fuji, Konica, etc.,
    : >>> brought up the rear.
    : >>
    : >> And some of those "etc."s made very nice cameras. My first really
    : >> good SLR (with TTL metering) was a Yashica.
    : >>
    : >> The great beauty of the M42 screw mount was that you could keep and
    : >> add to your collection of lenses while changing between several
    : >> different brands of camera. I had a Petri, two or three Yashicas, a
    : >> couple of Prakticas, a couple of Mamiya Sekors, and finally three
    : >> Fujicas over the years. The last Fujicas weren't as universally
    : >> compatible with respect to lenses because they had a *locking* screw
    : >> mount, which was almost a design contradiction. But all the others
    : >> were happy with any M42 lens.
    : >
    : > A lot of people referred to the M42 mount as the Pentax screw but
    : > originally it was the Edixa screw even though they didn't originate
    : > it.
    :
    : "Praktica-Pentax mount" was a common term for it, though neither Praktica
    : nor Pentax originated it. I don't know when Edixa first adopted it.
    :
    : It has long been claimed that the M42 mount originated with the Contax S,
    : which was also said to be the first SLR with a pentaprism.
    :
     
    Robert Coe, Jul 2, 2011
    #16
  17. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : Neil Ellwood wrote:
    : > On Fri, 01 Jul 2011 21:41:19 -0400, Neil Harrington wrote:
    : >
    : >> Rich wrote:
    : >>> : >>>
    : >>>> On 01/07/2011 12:43 PM, RichA wrote:
    : >>>>> I pity Pentaxians. But Ricoh as a company has acquired more than
    : >>>>> a few other companies over the last 10 years to boost its
    : >>>>> position in various markets. I wouldn't worry about a name
    : >>>>> change, Pentax is the name they want, Ricoh isn't well-known as a
    : >>>>> camera maker.
    : >>>>>
    : >>>>> http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?
    : >>>>> forum=1036&message=38795593
    : >>>>>
    : >>>> Ricoh has made cameras since 1936.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Ricoh was a SLR maker for eons, they used the M42 (Practika/Pentax
    : >>>> screwmount, and in the mid-1970's switched to the Pentax K-Mount.
    : >>>> They were an OEM maker of some of the Sears cameras.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Ricoh
    : >>>>
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Mike
    : >>>>
    : >>>>
    : >>>>
    : >>>>
    : >>> Second-tier maker. Pentax, Nikon, Canon, Minolta and Olympus were
    : >>> the most well-known in the SLR days.
    : >>
    : >> They were the "Big Five," yes. But there were excellent SLRs made by
    : >> several others.
    : >>
    : >>> Ricoh, Mamiya, Fuji, Konica, etc.,
    : >>> brought up the rear.
    : >>
    : >> And some of those "etc."s made very nice cameras. My first really
    : >> good SLR (with TTL metering) was a Yashica.
    : >>
    : >> The great beauty of the M42 screw mount was that you could keep and
    : >> add to your collection of lenses while changing between several
    : >> different brands of camera. I had a Petri, two or three Yashicas, a
    : >> couple of Prakticas, a couple of Mamiya Sekors, and finally three
    : >> Fujicas over the years. The last Fujicas weren't as universally
    : >> compatible with respect to lenses because they had a *locking* screw
    : >> mount, which was almost a design contradiction. But all the others
    : >> were happy with any M42 lens.
    : >
    : > A lot of people referred to the M42 mount as the Pentax screw but
    : > originally it was the Edixa screw even though they didn't originate
    : > it.
    :
    : "Praktica-Pentax mount" was a common term for it, though neither Praktica
    : nor Pentax originated it. I don't know when Edixa first adopted it.
    :
    : It has long been claimed that the M42 mount originated with the Contax S,
    : which was also said to be the first SLR with a pentaprism.

    That surprises me, because I always thought Contaxes had bayonet mounts. In
    the 50s and 60s, Leicas (until the M series) and Canons (which looked almost
    exactly like f-series Leicas) had screw mounts; Contaxes and Nikons (which
    looked a lot like Contaxes) had bayonet mounts. Or so I thought.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jul 2, 2011
    #17
  18. RichA

    Bruce Guest


    You're both partly right. However, the Contax rangefinder cameras
    (which looked a lot like Nikon rangefinder cameras because Nikon
    copied them) had bayonet mounts,while the Contax SLRs used the M42
    universal mount.

    The M42 mount was first used in 1947 on the Praktiflex SLR which had
    been in production at the Dresden factory of Kamera-Werkst├Ątten VEB
    Niedersedlitz since 1939 with a 40mm screw mount.

    The Contax S was also made in Dresden by Zeiss Ikon, which by then had
    officially split from Zeiss in West Germany. It adopted the M42
    mount. Production started in 1949.

    After some lengthy legal wrangling, Zeiss Ikon were denied the use of
    the Contax brand and chose the name "Pentacon" for future production.
    However, cameras sold in the Comecon (eastern bloc) countries were
    still labelled "Contax".
     
    Bruce, Jul 2, 2011
    #18
  19. RichA

    Bruce Guest


    Some useful indication on Miranda cameras here:
    http://www.mirandacamera.com/_modelid/modelid.htm
    and here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miranda_Camera_Company

    In the 1980s, Dixons, who were Britain's largest retailer of cameras,
    purchased the Miranda name and used it on a range of cheap and very
    nasty SLRs and lenses that were made by Cosina. They also applied the
    name to some very dubious accessories, including tripods whose
    extrusions were made from a soft and pliable alloy that rendered them
    useless.

    These products should not be confused with the genuine Miranda
    products made until 1978 when the company went bust.
     
    Bruce, Jul 2, 2011
    #19
  20. RichA

    Michael Guest

    I remember a lot of advetising for Miranda. They made the Miranda
    Sensorex and the Miranda Sensomat. One was the cheaper version of the
    other as i recall but I don't know which was which. The names stuck in
    my memory, however. On the rare occasion that I meet a girl named
    Miranda (not your everyday name these days) all I can think of is
    "Sensorex" or "Sensomat."
     
    Michael, Jul 2, 2011
    #20
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