Polarizing filter for winter

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Peter, Aug 28, 2006.

  1. Peter

    Peter Guest

    I have managed to make do without one this summer (doing post processing
    instead), but after having viewed results with and without one with the
    camera I have Canon S3 IS, I was curious about winter shots too.

    Can anyone offer advice on using a polarizing filter with snow? would you
    consider it essential?
     
    Peter, Aug 28, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. From: "Peter" <>

    | I have managed to make do without one this summer (doing post processing
    | instead), but after having viewed results with and without one with the
    | camera I have Canon S3 IS, I was curious about winter shots too.
    |
    | Can anyone offer advice on using a polarizing filter with snow? would you
    | consider it essential?
    |

    Use it anytime you have light reflections.
     
    David H. Lipman, Aug 28, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Peter

    m Ransley Guest

    I would use it anytime you have sun and a blue sky, it will make the sky
    more blue, reduce haze and strengthen colors. The only drawback is
    darkening only a section of the sky but that depends on your position to
    the sun
     
    m Ransley, Aug 29, 2006
    #3
  4. Peter

    dadiOH Guest

    A polaroid filter is good for two (and only two) things at anytime of
    year...

    1. Removing specular reflections (a "specular" reflection is one of
    the light source). The light from those reflections is polarized and
    that will only happen at around 30 degrees from the camera.

    Normally, one wants to remove specular reflections to reveal what is
    hidden by them and/or to increase the color saturation in the affected
    area; however, if you remove the specular reflections from snow you
    will be removing the "glisten" which - in this case - is desireable
    IMO, YMMV.

    2. Darkening the sky. Again, that will only occur when the light is
    polarized and that polarization is at the maximum at the zenith...at
    an angle that is 90 degrees from the sun to you to the sky. It will
    do little or nothing elsewhere dependent upon how much off 90 degrees
    the sky area is.

    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Aug 29, 2006
    #4
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.