Praying mantis catches and eats hummingbird (!!)

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by casioculture, Aug 13, 2005.

  1. casioculture

    casioculture Guest

    Some praying mantis and hummingbird pics have been posted to these
    newsgroups lately; well, as far as I'm concerned, this is the mother of
    all praying mantis and hummingbird pics!

    I'm so disturbed, the horror! An insect catching and eating a bird?!
    Jesus!

    I may even be more disturbed than I felt on that occasion I watched an
    ocean documentary that had a scene of a giant deep water octopus
    catching and eating a huge vicious shark! An Invertebrate catching and
    eating a humongous friggin shark?! - whooaaaa!!

    The chutzpah! No, seriously, the chutzpah! Have they no respect?!

    What next? are we next? what lowly creature is going to dare his luck
    upon us? Am I next? Am I going to be consumed by a 6' slug?

    Ah so Kafkaesque! My stomach is turning! Photos here...

    http://tinyurl.com/8nxtm
     
    casioculture, Aug 13, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. There are mantises in the rain forest that are a foot long.....If you couple
    that fact with those pictures, it can give you nightmares........
     
    William Graham, Aug 13, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. casioculture

    casioculture Guest

    Photos from another incident
    http://www.rlephoto.com/birds/hummer01.htm

    Text from another incident (Google for sources of below)
    "Hummingbirds eaten by praying mantis

    This is not a question but more a warning. With 25 feeders in our front
    yard we attract many hummingbirds but this year we had a tragic
    experience. We found a praying mantis on the hummingbird feeder with a
    adult female bird in her claws. She was feeding on the hummingbirds'
    brains and then dropping them and waiting for another. As I know that
    mantises are very beneficial I did not kill it although I felt like it.
    We removed the offending insect and checked very carefully twice a day.
    I am tell eNature readers about this unfortunate incident so they can
    be watchful. I had never had this happen before but once was enough. If
    I had not have been so discussed (disgusted?) by the sight I would have
    taken a photograph. And "YES" it was a huge female mantis."


    Text from another incident
    ""Mrs. Elly Weirda of Rock Hall, Maryland. was watching her hummingbird
    feeder when she noticed a large praying mantis sitting on top of it. As
    the hummingbirds approached, it appeared as if the praying mantis was
    actually stalking them. This continued all day, but the hummingbirds
    safely eluded the clutches of the praying mantis. When the praying
    mantis was still on top of the hummingbird feeder the next day, Mrs.
    Weirda decided to capture the unusual activity on film. She quickly set
    up her camera and waited. As fate would have it. the praying mantis'
    persistence paid off. The unexpected did happen, and Mrs. Weirda
    captured the humming-bird's struggle on film. The amazing thing about
    this strange event is that the praying mantis consumed the entire
    hummingbird. Only a few feathers were left as witness to the struggle."
     
    casioculture, Aug 13, 2005
    #3
  4. casioculture

    Paul Heslop Guest

    funnily enough apparently it isn't unknown, just look for predators
    here

    http://www.worldstart.com/tips/tips.php/1601
     
    Paul Heslop, Aug 13, 2005
    #4
  5. casioculture

    grumpy Guest

    Think that's bad...

    In Australia and South America, there are bird eating spiders!
     
    grumpy, Aug 13, 2005
    #5
  6. casioculture

    Mark² Guest

    That reminds me of the huge spiders in the jungles of Colombia (S. America)
    where I grew up.
    These nasty whopper spiders (not tarantulas, either, but big HUGE
    spiders)...that would build massive webs accross narrow streams, and
    actually catch small FISH in the web-net as they jumped.
    Amazing.
     
    Mark², Aug 13, 2005
    #6
  7. casioculture

    Deedee Tee Guest

    How about bacteria or viruses eating you from the inside out? Is this
    gross enough? Well, it happens every day, as a matter of fact...

    The larvae of certain water bugs eat mostly tadpoles and fishes, so
    they don't respect vertebrates just because the latter are supposedly
    higher on the evolutionary scale, either. Maybe no one yet told the
    bugs. Sea anemones and certain jellyfish eat fish, so no respect for
    vertebrates here, either. Cone snails instantly kill fishes with some
    of the most effective neurotoxins around, then eat them whole. Snakes
    eat supposedly higher evolved and smarter mice and birds, and large
    snakes sometimes eat even our cousins, the monkeys. So does the
    Monkey-Eating Eagle of the Philippines. Having a higher pedigree is no
    guarantee that one will not end up on the dish of a lower organism.
     
    Deedee Tee, Aug 13, 2005
    #7
  8. casioculture

    casioculture Guest

    That would be millions, if not billions, of them, not just one. And
    anyhow, it'd be invisible enough for it to be called an illness, not a
    gruesome act of predation.

    What I find interesting is that my disturbed reaction is not unique;
    according to the accounts I linked to or pasted, one guy was too
    "stunned" to take a good picture, and another was too 'disgusted' to
    take any at all!
     
    casioculture, Aug 14, 2005
    #8
  9. casioculture

    Ken Tough Guest

    Yeah, those mantis are pretty fiesty. Not long ago I saw some
    thrush-sized birds going after what looked like a leaf in a pile
    on the roof. On closer look I saw it was a mantis fighting them off.
    By the time I got my camera (my son needed attention) the battle was
    over and the bug gone, but it must have lasted at least 5 minutes.
     
    Ken Tough, Aug 19, 2005
    #9
  10. casioculture

    salgud Guest

    Are you horrified when you eat a chicken?
     
    salgud, Aug 19, 2005
    #10
  11. I'm sure it happened a lot during the Silurian period and the Carboniferous
    period....And that was a long time before Jesus.......
     
    William Graham, Aug 19, 2005
    #11
  12. casioculture

    Mark² Guest

    Jesus was not eaten by a preying mantis...
     
    Mark², Aug 19, 2005
    #12
  13. casioculture

    Bret Ludwig Guest

    I used to indoor target shoot with wax bullets from a heavy DA
    revolver, using shotgun primers and hard transformer potting wax mixed
    with paraffin. (I painted targets on a big slab of ballistic plexiglass
    I bought surplus.) I was outside once and saw a mantis with a
    hummingbird in just this fashion. Never mind the camera, I got my
    shootin' iron and blasted the mantis with the wax slug. I also used
    these wax slugs on dogs shitting in the yard. It did them no permanent
    injury, but left a good-size welt on their ass.

    Of course, mantises eating birds are part of nature. But so are humans
    who kill bugs for entertainment.

    I've also zapped spiders and other big bugs with megohmmeters and
    hypot testers.
     
    Bret Ludwig, Aug 19, 2005
    #13
  14. casioculture

    Bret Ludwig Guest

    Though a lot of his followers have been in the food chain for the
    praying mantis, a/k/a televangelists...
     
    Bret Ludwig, Aug 19, 2005
    #14
  15. casioculture

    Mark² Guest

    Though a lot of his followers have been in the food chain for the
    praying mantis, a/k/a televangelists...
     
    Mark², Aug 19, 2005
    #15
  16. casioculture

    ian lincoln Guest

    Bet you pulled the wings off butterflies when you were a kid and burned ants
    with a magnifying glass.
     
    ian lincoln, Aug 19, 2005
    #16
  17. casioculture

    Sander Vesik Guest

    Birds weren't around in Silurian period. Neither were insects really.
     
    Sander Vesik, Aug 20, 2005
    #17
  18. casioculture

    grumpy Guest

    Prove it. ;-)
     
    grumpy, Aug 20, 2005
    #18
  19. My google source said insects started during the Silurian.....I don't know
    about birds......But the insects needed something to limit their
    numbers....So birds couldn't have been too far behind.....
     
    William Graham, Aug 21, 2005
    #19
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.