Print size vs real pixels. Baffled.

Discussion in 'Photoshop Tutorials' started by Dan Uneken, Oct 2, 2003.

  1. Dan Uneken

    Dan Uneken Guest

    Hi!

    Something that really baffles me is the difference between viewing
    (and printing) print size and viewing real pixel format. The print
    size comes out at 31.3% of the real pixel (100%) size.
    The picture is 816 x 1224 pixels and the res is 230 pixels/inch (it
    came out of a Kodak LS443 like that).
    Now for the web I like my pics say 800 wide on a landscape pic, but if
    I resize to 800 wide the pic comes out as a miniature on the web
    page!!

    I am missing something, I feel it!!!

    Thanks very much!

    Dan.
     
    Dan Uneken, Oct 2, 2003
    #1
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  2. Dan Uneken

    jjs Guest

    Print size is typically 300 to 360"dpi" on an inkjet printer. Your screen is
    anywhere beetween 72 and 120, but probably 72.
    In what format, please? JPEG?
    :) Use Save for Web to make life a little easier. But you should take a
    trip to the 'image size' dialog and be sure the 'resolution' box is set to,
    say, 72 and then set the horizontal size to 800pixels.
     
    jjs, Oct 2, 2003
    #2
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  3. Dan Uneken

    Warren Sarle Guest

    Perfectly reasonable.

    If the image is 800 pixels wide, it should display on the web page
    as 800 pixels wide unless you are adding instructions to the html
    to display it at a different size, in which case you should delete
    those instructions from the html.

    Where is this web page?
     
    Warren Sarle, Oct 2, 2003
    #3
  4. Dan Uneken

    Warren Sarle Guest

    Let's not take these numbers too seriously.
    My largest monitor at minimum resolution displays 24 pixels/inch.
    My smallest monitor at maximum resolution displays 107 pixels/inch.
    I believe some monitors go up to about 128 pixels/inch, perhaps more.
     
    Warren Sarle, Oct 2, 2003
    #4
  5. Dan Uneken

    jjs Guest

    Yes, it's better to look at the specs. I have 96 and 120 here. Sucks when I
    do web pages for The Rest of the world.
     
    jjs, Oct 2, 2003
    #5
  6. Dan Uneken

    Dan Uneken Guest

    Dan Uneken, Oct 3, 2003
    #6
  7. Dan Uneken

    Xalinai Guest

    Your images measure 350 pixels in width, not 800.
    You should start again with the original image and resize it to a
    certain number of pixels and ignore any resolution settings -
    resolution is irrelevant for the web.

    Michael
     
    Xalinai, Oct 3, 2003
    #7
  8. Dan Uneken

    Warren Sarle Guest

    No, not at all. The pixels/inch value has nothing to do with the
    size at which images are displayed on the web. Each pixel in the
    image is displayed as one pixel in the web page. The image will
    look exactly the same whether pixels/inch is set to 72 or 1.3 or
    45236.
    000_0005.jpg, to take one example, is 350 pixels by 233 pixels.
    If you want it to be larger, you have to specify a larger number
    of pixels in the Web Photo Gallery dialog.
     
    Warren Sarle, Oct 3, 2003
    #8
  9. Dan Uneken

    Tacit Guest

    but if
    If you resize to 800 what? 800 inches wide? 800 pixels wide? 800 spaghetti
    wide?

    A Web browser never looks at the resolution of the image. It only looks at the
    dimensions of the image in pixels. A 400 by 400 pixel image at 300 pixels per
    inch is *identical* to a 400 by 400 pixel image at 72 pixels per inch is
    *identical* to a 400 by 400 pixel image at 1,000,000,000,000 pixels per inch in
    a Web browser. The ONLY thing that matters is the total number of pixels.

    An 800-pixel-wide image will fill the screen if your monitor is set to 800 x
    600, will fill about 2/3 of the screen at 1024 x 768, and so on.
     
    Tacit, Oct 5, 2003
    #9
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