Problem with hot shoe on Canon Elan IIE

Discussion in 'Canon' started by Ran, Jul 30, 2003.

  1. Ran

    Ran Guest

    Hi,

    I have a been using a generic flash on my camera, which fits into the
    hot shoe using a tightening ring.
    With time and overtightening, the flash "foot" has scored the show
    base to a depth of a few milimeters. This causes the flash to function
    intermittently, sometimes failing to fire as much as every other shot.
    The camera still shows the flash as properly connected all the time.

    Can anyone advise on how to fill up the scratches or otherwise
    overcome this problem?

    Thanks and regards,

    Yuval
     
    Ran, Jul 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. Ran

    wolvertone!! Guest


    If you are very handy, you might could build the contacts up with
    solder. Be VERY careful if you do this.

    Steve
     
    wolvertone!!, Jul 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. If it were mine, I would try using one of the epoxy putty fillers
    available. The one I have used in the past is called "Milliput" in the
    UK, but in other countries the brands will probably be different. It
    comes as two strips of plasticene-like material which are coloured
    differently. You knead them together until all traces of the different
    colours have blended, then use it to fill the gaps.

    A couple of hints. First, to smooth it, use a knife blade or other
    implement dipped in water to prevent sticking. Second, to help maximise
    adhesion to the plastic base of the shoe, I suggest you carefully score
    some undercuts in the groove to help the putty key to the plastic.

    When rock-hard, a little easing with a fine swiss file might be needed
    to allow a free fit of the flashgun, depending on how good you were with
    the initial filling/smoothing.

    It may be possible to get the stuff in black (I'm assuming that your
    shoe is black), or to put some colouring material in to darken it.
    Otherwise, a little indian ink on the file-roughened surface will
    probably do the trick.
     
    David Littlewood, Aug 2, 2003
    #3
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