Problems with file corruption

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by Jeremy, Aug 29, 2004.

  1. Jeremy

    Jeremy Guest

    I have been experiencing problems playing back windows video files
    after my computer's operating system was rebuilt. I hope that someone
    will be able to help me recover these videos as they represent many
    hours of work.
    I have a Firebird XE Professional and have recorded videos using the
    DViCO plug-in for Adobe Premiere, version 6.02, onto a Windows 2000
    based system. This system has three hard drives. The C: drive contains
    only the operating system. The D: and E: drives contain the video
    files that I captured using the Firebird XE Pro card. Each of the
    video files have a .avi component and the series of associated
    temp*.dvv files with sizes up to 2GB.
    Recently, the Windows 2000 registry became corrupt and was
    reinstalled on the C: drive only. During this process, no video files
    on the D: and E: drives were changed at all. Their drive partitions
    were not changed, either. After the reinstallation, I have tried to
    play back the video files using Window Media Player version 6.4. With
    some files, only the audio is present, but there is no picture -- only
    a grey screen is visible. Some of the other files do not even open
    under the media player. I have the same problems when I use DocuCap
    version 2.30.
    I therefore have the following questions:
    1) Does a change in the operating system registry affect AVI files,
    or specifically, the files recorded using the DVICO Firebird XE Pro?
    2) If the files have been corrupted, can they be restored in some
    way?
    3) What codec must be installed in Windows 2000 to view the files
    properly?

    Thanks in advance.

    Jeremy.
     
    Jeremy, Aug 29, 2004
    #1
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  2. Jeremy

    Mike777 Guest

    Usually this is caused by faulty memory. Search for Prime 95 on the internet and
    run the "torture test." This test should be able to run forever without errors.
    If your memory is faulty, it sometimes fails within seconds. This should
    eliminate memory or CPU problems as the cause.

    From past experience, getting corrupt registry was always faulty memory. Or
    possibly the memory is overclocked.
     
    Mike777, Aug 29, 2004
    #2
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  3. Jeremy

    Joe Guest

    Joe, Aug 31, 2004
    #3
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