problems with Pinnacle Studio 17

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by Brian, Feb 14, 2014.

  1. Brian

    Brian Guest

    I enjoy trying out new programs and recently a friend of mine was very
    pleased with Pinnacle Studio Ultimate 17 having used Adobe Premiere
    Elements in the past.

    I installed Pinnacle Studio 17 on my laptop to try it out but it locked up
    when I clicked on the import tab, and the same thing happened when clicking
    on the organizing tab. I read that there are many errors when using this
    program on a laptop.
    I ran a program to help fix some problems with my laptop and decided to try
    Pinnacle studio 17 again and this time the tabs I clicked on worked but the
    only problem I have is that there is no picture in the monitor when I click
    on the timeline tab (you can switch between timeline and source when
    viewing a video clip). Someone suggested installing an older version of
    DirectX dated about 2010, but this didn't work when I tried it.

    If anyone is using this program on their laptop and managed to find
    solutions to this problem then please let me know how you solved the
    problem. Its unusual that this problem occurs on laptop computers only.
     
    Brian, Feb 14, 2014
    #1
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  2. Brian

    Brian Guest

    No replies to my post, but thats understandable as most people in this
    group use Adobe Premiere or Vegas as their video editor.
    I have heard that Pinnacle 17 causes computers to overhead as their is a
    lot of strain on the processor.
     
    Brian, Feb 22, 2014
    #2
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  3. Brian

    Paul Guest

    A properly engineered cooling solution, does not overheat.
    You build a cooler, rated for the heat. That's why the processor
    has a TDP rating, to help a cooling engineer use an adequate
    heatsink/fan.

    Same thing applies to the computer case cooling. If using a heatsink
    on the CPU, you have to move the cloud of warm air around the CPU,
    outside the case. There is a formula for computing the amount of
    CFMs for the fan, to do that properly.

    CFM = 3.16 * Watts / Delta_T_degrees_F

    You set the Delta_T, computer case air to ambient, to a reasonable
    value, so the hard drives don't overheat. Let's pretend that is 10F
    for the moment. A 35CFM rear fan would then handle about 100 watts
    (suited to a modern, gutless desktop).

    So "yes, it gets warm", but "no, it doesn't overhead", if the
    job was done right.

    *******

    Pinnacle Systems is now owned by Corel. When companies merge/acquire/crush
    other companies, strange things happen to their products. Sometimes
    during an acquisition, a "retention bonus" is offered to employees.
    They stay with the company for a year, during the bonus retention time.
    Managers might leave after they get their bonus. Who can say what
    happened to the "talent" in this case. Only the product reviews,
    know the real story (reviews on Amazon, by real users).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinnacle_Systems

    "Pinnacle was subsequently acquired by American company
    Avid Technology in August 2005.

    Avid subsequently sold Pinnacle products to
    Corel Corporation in July 2012.
    "

    http://www.mediacastermagazine.com/pressroom/productDetail.aspx?id=9524&er=NA

    "As part of the transaction, the company [Corel] will welcome a core group
    of employees from the Pinnacle product team to its digital media group"

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 22, 2014
    #3
  4. Brian

    HerHusband Guest

    Brian,
    I used Pinnacle Studio for many years up to version 15. It was always buggy
    in some form, but I was able to work around most of them.

    Version 16 was a big departure from prior versions, and lost the ease of
    use I liked about prior versions. So I switched to Cyberlink PowerDirector
    12. It took a little bit to familiarize myself with the new program, but so
    far I'm liking it better than Studio 15.
    Sounds like you need better cooling for your computer. I often run my
    computer full bore with multiple programs processing data and it never
    overheats. The fans just speed up to increase cooling.

    Anthony Watson
    www.mountainsoftware.com
    www.watsondiy.com
     
    HerHusband, Feb 22, 2014
    #4
  5. Brian

    Brian Guest

    I. Goy the information from a friend who said that his computers processors
    ran at half speed to prevent from over heating when compiling with the
    Ultra version of Pinnacle Studio 17.
     
    Brian, Feb 27, 2014
    #5
  6. Brian

    Brian Guest

    I have a Toshiba computer that runs cool. It never gets hot no matter how
    much the work load. It uses a Intel i7 processor. My older Acer computer
    got hot and I had to wait until it cooled before putting it away in the
    laptop carrier bag.
     
    Brian, Feb 27, 2014
    #6
  7. Brian

    Paul Guest

    If you want to check for thermal throttling, there's a tool for that.

    http://ixbtlabs.com/articles2/cpu/intel-thermal-features-core2.html

    And there's always a way to cool that CPU down, at least, if it is
    a desktop system. A laptop, there's no room for custom coolers, so
    you have to live with inadequate designs.

    Several cooling solutions are termed "sub-ambient", because the
    CPU can be cooled below room temperature. Some of those methods
    are temporary (using dry ice or liquid nitrogen). Typical liquid
    nitrogen runs might last half an hour. Using a refrigerator system,
    can be done continuously. And an expensive, well designed one, has
    been able to do -100C while the CPU is running. There are also
    Peltier coolers, which are hard on the electricity (200W+ power
    needed to run a good one, a second ATX supply just to run the cooler),
    which give lesser improvements on cooling. But the advantage there,
    is no moving parts on the Peltier part. There's still likely to be
    a fan to remove all the heat the Peltier is kicking out. And the
    room gets a lot warmer if you use a Peltier.

    This site has cooling forums, where enthusiasts discuss their
    latest creations. There's a small cottage industry out there,
    catering to these people. For example, for $5000, there's an
    HVAC guy who will build you one of those -100C coolers.

    http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/forum.php

    Cooling
    Air Cooling
    Chilled Liquid Cooling
    Dry Ice and Liquid Nitrogen
    Liquid Cooling (simple water cooling loops)
    T.E.C. Cooling (i.e. Peltier)
    Vapor Phase Change Cooling (i.e. refrigerator)

    Practically speaking, it's just easier to buy a motherboard,
    CPU, and RAM, and do an upgrade to something a bit easier
    to cool.

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 27, 2014
    #7
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