Professional cameras not allowed

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by tony cooper, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. tony cooper

    Mxsmanic Guest

    Yes, and I personally wrote it.
     
    Mxsmanic, Sep 7, 2012
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  2. They all look like members of a hit squad. Perhaps I've been watching
    too much TV.
     
    Grimly Curmudgeon, Sep 7, 2012
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  3. Yeah; Leica M9, yes, Nikon D40, no.

    Makes perfect sense, right?

    (And I'd at least try arguing that a D700 isn't a professional camera,
    the pro line is the D4.)
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 7, 2012
  4. And why should the have the right to restrict that?
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 7, 2012
  5. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    suggest you read, with comprehension, the full volume.
    A;though dated 1935, the enunciated principles are still valid.
    <http://www.constitution.org/cmt/jhb/conflict_laws.htm>


    Also, WRT contracts issues you might want to consider

    <http://store.westlaw.com/williston-on-contracts-4th/1403/13511436/productdetail>
    --
    WRT Real Property issues:
    <http://www.lexisnexis.com/store/cat...ail.jsp?pageName=relatedProducts&prodId=10123

    All of the above are available at any depository law library.

    Last, but certainly not least, you should certainly understand the
    meaning of the reservation of powers contained in Article 1 of the US
    Constitution.

    If you think that Federal law preempts State Law in all cases, your
    legal education is sorely lacking.



    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 7, 2012
  6. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    PeterN, Sep 7, 2012
  7. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    You really have a problem.
     
    PeterN, Sep 7, 2012
  8. tony cooper

    Mxsmanic Guest

    A lot of people unfamiliar with photography think Leicas are hand-me-downs
    from Grandpa and the great war.

    Sometimes it's the length of the lens. I guess pros only use long lenses.

    Ironically, the diameter of the lens is more likely to distinguish pros from
    amateurs than the length.
     
    Mxsmanic, Sep 7, 2012
  9. Certainly a III series probably is, or else too valuable to take out and
    use.
    People fairly frequently ask how "powerful" my lens is. Mostly when I'm
    using the 24-70/2.8. With the petal hood; so it's actually fairly long,
    and quite big around too.
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 8, 2012
  10. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    I've hard similar comments when using my 70-299 f2.8. When I want to be
    inconspicuous, I use my 50mm f1.4.
     
    PeterN, Sep 8, 2012
  11. tony cooper

    Mxsmanic Guest

    Just tell them that it's as powerful as a small gas turbine engine.
     
    Mxsmanic, Sep 9, 2012
  12. Yeah, I should work out an answer in horsepower. Or Newtons.
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 9, 2012
  13. tony cooper

    Mxsmanic Guest

    Or curies. That would scare them!
     
    Mxsmanic, Sep 9, 2012
  14. Amusing the Curious for 58 years!
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 9, 2012
  15. [/QUOTE]
    - There's only a single supplier of each item (and usually an
    item group) of groceries you can use, no matter how much money
    you're willing to spend. Worse, for many items you need to
    ask several parties as each one of them hold a part of the item
    and it can only be used complete.

    Cereals: grain, sugar, making flakes, frosting, each additive,
    adding additives, using a carton, using a plastic bag to
    hold food items, printing on a package, selling packages
    ... everything held by a different party, and if just one party
    disagrees or overcharges badly ...

    When I buy groceries, I have a choice of many suppliers: several
    chains of several sizes, independent stores, specialized stores,
    online stores, ... and most items and all item groups have
    multiple sources within easy walking distance. If one shop
    is out of something I can go to the next shop, even of the
    same chain. They're all *very* willing to sell to me, and due
    to lots of competition prices are acceptable or downright cheap.

    - If you grow something in your backyard, you need to pay for a
    license --- unfortunately, for your apple tree you can't get a
    license, so you need to chop it down. You could try to claim
    apples were there before the need to license was granted, but
    that'll bancrupt you. And even if you were to win in a couple
    years from now, your tree still needs to be chopped down today.

    Where I live I can just buy seeds and grow groceries (except
    for stuff like pot and similar drugs). I can use the seeds of
    the plants I have grown to grow new plants if I like.

    Guess you still live in the old communist block, where shortages
    are the daily bread and getting a car would take 10-15 years
    (unless you were a fat cat). Oh, being able to choose between 2
    items of a kind (say tomato ketchup) is a rare treat for you.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Sep 9, 2012
  16. I see. Licenses do not matter.
    Irrelevant, this is no longer about the photograph.
    You need to actually *read* what you reply to.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Sep 9, 2012
  17. What as the fact that some "intellectual property" is deemed
    valuable to do with legal photography of trees and the selling
    of the same (which is also "intellectual property")?

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Sep 9, 2012
  18. Seems the US law system is broken, if it's not a "loser pays
    all" system.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Sep 9, 2012
  19. tony cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest

    In that case you should stick with more simple recipes.
    How do you determine overcharging? Isn't this just another way of
    saying "more than I want to pay"?
    They still have a price which you have to pay.
    That's not correct. Patents allow personal use.
    So, you have no real problems.
    Your geography is extremely muddled.

    I live in New Zealand.
     
    Eric Stevens, Sep 10, 2012
  20. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    The loser only pays the costs if the case comes to trial and the
    decision requires that. There can be extensive legal costs in
    preparing for a case to come to trial, and those costs may not be
    recovered if the case is settled out of court or if the case is
    dropped before trial.

    In the majority of legal actions brought, there is no winner or loser
    because the cases are dropped or settled.
     
    tony cooper, Sep 10, 2012
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