Pushing HP5+ with PMK Pyro

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by ted the student, Sep 29, 2003.

  1. hello all,

    just thought i would seek the opinions of those more technically
    proficient than myself...

    a few months ago by mistake i found that Ilford HP5+ could be pushed
    from ISO 400 to ISO 3200 using Kodak T-Max developer at 75 degrees
    farenheit for 9.5minutes...

    as for why i was trying to push the film, i was in a tight situation
    and needed 3200 and i knew i had a better chance with the HP5 than
    nothing at all...

    anyway, i have used this several times since, and it has had pleasing
    results...i would say the grain is similar to if not better than T-Max
    3200...that and i've never been the biggest fan of kodak...

    recently however, i have grown weary of buying T-Max, and wasn't to
    keen on the photographer's formulary t-max substitute and was looking
    for something that was economical for me (a lowly photography student
    with a very limited budget) and i had heard of PMK Pyro, saw the
    dilutions, and was stuck

    today, testing films i shot three rolls of HP5+ at ISO 3200, i then
    stepped into the darkroom, estimated that i would need somewhere
    between a 45%-75% time increase in development and went with 3 times,
    12+45%time = 17.4mins (a fellow student disturbed my train of thought
    and roll was wrecked) 12min+60% time =19.2mins, this roll came out
    wonderfully...its contrast was good (to my own eye at least) and the
    density was good...then i did the 3rd roll at 21mins (75% time
    increase)...this came out thinner than 19.2mins....(btw this was all
    done at 22 degrees celsius)

    at the moment i have no clue what went wrong...i'm hoping my first
    success wasn't a fluke...and that the time (19.2mins) i found is good
    and somewhat repeatable...the only thing that I can remember is not
    agitating as consistently as I did with the previous roll...

    any suggestions, opinions, etc would be appreciated, and for those who
    think i'm crazy...i like grain (not to mention i print most of this
    with lith developer anyway)

    thanks
     
    ted the student, Sep 29, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. ted the student

    Frank Pittel Guest

    The first problem that you're having is that with the exception
    of Tmax3200 (and some people will claim that it holds for it as well)
    you can't "push" film. When you extend the development time you increase
    the contrast curve. When learning the zone system the first thing that
    you are taught is to expose for the shadows and develop for the highlights.

    To make a long story short the exposure sets the density of the shadow area
    and the development time controls the density of the highlights. Although
    extending the development time can help you get something remember that
    it's effect isn't linear. Think of it as a way of saving a shot rather then
    a way of increasing film speed.


    : hello all,

    : just thought i would seek the opinions of those more technically
    : proficient than myself...

    : a few months ago by mistake i found that Ilford HP5+ could be pushed
    : from ISO 400 to ISO 3200 using Kodak T-Max developer at 75 degrees
    : farenheit for 9.5minutes...

    : as for why i was trying to push the film, i was in a tight situation
    : and needed 3200 and i knew i had a better chance with the HP5 than
    : nothing at all...

    : anyway, i have used this several times since, and it has had pleasing
    : results...i would say the grain is similar to if not better than T-Max
    : 3200...that and i've never been the biggest fan of kodak...

    : recently however, i have grown weary of buying T-Max, and wasn't to
    : keen on the photographer's formulary t-max substitute and was looking
    : for something that was economical for me (a lowly photography student
    : with a very limited budget) and i had heard of PMK Pyro, saw the
    : dilutions, and was stuck

    : today, testing films i shot three rolls of HP5+ at ISO 3200, i then
    : stepped into the darkroom, estimated that i would need somewhere
    : between a 45%-75% time increase in development and went with 3 times,
    : 12+45%time = 17.4mins (a fellow student disturbed my train of thought
    : and roll was wrecked) 12min+60% time =19.2mins, this roll came out
    : wonderfully...its contrast was good (to my own eye at least) and the
    : density was good...then i did the 3rd roll at 21mins (75% time
    : increase)...this came out thinner than 19.2mins....(btw this was all
    : done at 22 degrees celsius)

    : at the moment i have no clue what went wrong...i'm hoping my first
    : success wasn't a fluke...and that the time (19.2mins) i found is good
    : and somewhat repeatable...the only thing that I can remember is not
    : agitating as consistently as I did with the previous roll...

    : any suggestions, opinions, etc would be appreciated, and for those who
    : think i'm crazy...i like grain (not to mention i print most of this
    : with lith developer anyway)

    : thanks

    --




    Keep working millions on welfare depend on you
     
    Frank Pittel, Sep 29, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. My Heavens! You sound just like Michael Scarpitti, Frank. Better
    hope he doesn't find out. ;-/
    Robert Vervoordt, MFA
     
    Robert Vervoordt, Oct 1, 2003
    #3
  4. He has, and he wants to know why people are stealing his material...

    Did you hear the one about.....

    My country is so poor...
    'How poor is it?'

    ....we have only ONE Stooges!

    .....and he has to hit himself!
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Oct 1, 2003
    #4
  5. In Texas they say "He could **** up a one-man rock fight.".
     
    David Nebenzahl, Oct 1, 2003
    #5
  6. It can't.
    Just process normally and print on a harder grade of paper. Extending
    the time gets you nothing more in the way of shadow detail than you
    get with standard devlopment. 'Pushing' is a myth.
    Try Ilford Delta 3200, rate it at 800, develop in Paterson FX-39. If
    you cannot find any FX-39 (B&H carries it), send the film to me and
    I'll process it for you. You really can't get ***true*** speed much
    higher than about EI 800-1200 with any currently available film,
    AFAIK.
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Oct 2, 2003
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.