Q: Scanning photo prints v. negatives.

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Ian Smith, Feb 28, 2004.

  1. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    I'm no photo expert, but recently been scanning some photos from last year,
    which are just standard prints from a standard film processor shop. Anyway, I
    was wondering if it might be better to scan the 35mm negatives on a dedicated
    scanner, since I have quite a few to get through. Would this give better
    results, ie. higher resolution, higher quality, than the
    prints-on-flatbed-scanner technique which I've been using? And what dpi should I
    aim for?

    Below is a link to one I did recently via the print/flatbed method (enhanced
    with the "unsharp mask" in Photoshop). Any tips much appreciated, and please
    excuse my igorance on this.

    kind regards,

    Ian Smith, Renfrew, Scotland.

    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/ianinhoose/lochgoilhead_village.jpg
     
    Ian Smith, Feb 28, 2004
    #1
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  2. Ian Smith

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    Greetings from Canada.

    Picture looks mighty nice to my old eyes... :)

    Wonder if it's for sale? Looks a little
    better than my cabin at the lake :) :)

    Take care.

    Ken
     
    Ken Weitzel, Feb 29, 2004
    #2
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  3. Ian Smith

    Don Stauffer Guest

    There are some ifs that determine how well a scan from a negative
    compares with a scan from a print.

    If the print is made from a good (optical) quality enlarger, and if it
    is exposed properly, both the original neg and the print, then you can
    get about as good a quality in a print scan as from a negative scan.
    And, the print must be large enough to allow you to scan within the max
    scan pixels per inch of the scanner and still have lots of pixels.

    However, the scan from the neg will have more dynamic range, which means
    that you can adjust the output more before printing. That is, if the
    print you scan is lacking in shadow detail or highlights, then you
    cannot recover these details by digital processing. However, if it is a
    GOOD print, and you want to make a print from the scan, you will get
    just as high resolution as if you scan a negative

    Example- 6 x 4 print with a 600 ppi scanner gives a 3600 x 2400 image,
    or a 7 x 5 print yields a 4200 x 3000 image, and there are print
    scanners with even higher res.
     
    Don Stauffer, Feb 29, 2004
    #3
  4. I recommend scanning from a neg if you have a decent scanner as you will end
    up with a second generation image keep in mind the neg is the first
    generation.

    If you scan a print you will get a 3rd generation image.

    As you add generations you get a softer image with less detail.

    Gary
     
    Gary J Bevans, Mar 1, 2004
    #4
  5. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    Many thanks to all who responded. It looks like I'll be acquiring a
    dedicated 35mm scanner, considering the quantity I have to scan. The current
    flatbed is just too slow anyway.
    Need to do a bit of overtime first though. :)

    And I will keep an eye on this newsgroup in future for other handy tips on
    digital imaging. Thanks again.

    regards,

    Ian
     
    Ian Smith, Mar 2, 2004
    #5
  6. Ian Smith

    Cool Hand Guest

    Another way to do it is to use your digital camera.
    There are web sites devoted for this. Search for it.

    On Tue, 2 Mar 2004 22:43:22 -0000, "Ian Smith"

    =>
    => Many thanks to all who responded. It looks like I'll be acquiring a
    =>dedicated 35mm scanner, considering the quantity I have to scan. The current
    =>flatbed is just too slow anyway.
    => Need to do a bit of overtime first though. :)
    =>
    => And I will keep an eye on this newsgroup in future for other handy tips on
    =>digital imaging. Thanks again.
    =>
    =>regards,
    =>
    =>Ian
    =>
     
    Cool Hand, Mar 3, 2004
    #6
  7. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    Repeating this because the last post didn't show up; ISP problems. If it did
    to you then sorry.
    Thanks to all who responded. Looks like the dedicated 35mm negative scanner
    is the way to go for me, considering the hundreds of pics I need to scan. Need
    to work some overtime to afford it, though. :)

    Cheers,

    Ian, Renfrew, Scotland.
     
    Ian Smith, Mar 6, 2004
    #7
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